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Journal ArticleDOI

SEM studies on a mangrove rust of Sundarbans, Eastern India.

01 Jun 1998-Fungal Biology (Elsevier)-Vol. 102, Iss: 6, pp 692-694
TL;DR: The uredinial stage of Skierka agallocha was detected on leaves of Excoecaria ag allocha, collected for the first time from mangroves of the Sundarbans during 1992.
Abstract: The uredinial stage of Skierka agallocha was detected on leaves of Excoecaria agallocha, collected for the first time from mangroves of the Sundarbans during 1992 This communication deals with light microscope and scanning electron microscope characters of this mangrove rust
Topics: Excoecaria agallocha (65%), Mangrove (53%)
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2019-
TL;DR: The diversity of un-culturable bacteria and archaea of the Sundarbans have been explored by applying the metagenomic approach, and the sequence data have been analyzed using bioinformatics tools.
Abstract: Sundarbans, the world’s largest tidal mangrove forest, lies in the delta of the Ganges, Brahmaputra, and Meghna rivers. The ecosystem is dynamic and the biodiversity is enormously rich. The debris and the waste materials generated by local industry as well as domestic sources flowing through the rivers accumulate in this deltaic region. This detritus-based hugely productive ecosystem supplies large amounts of organic substances to the resident organisms and builds up a productive ecosystem. Mangroves are one of the striking sources of microbial diversity. Microbes have been explored as a potential source of bioactive compounds for novel pharmaceutical applications. Till date, very little work has been carried out on the microbial diversity of the Sundarbans. Few attempts have been made to explore the culturable and un-culturable microorganisms of this ecosystem. Till date, two novel species, Streptomyces sundarbansensis sp. nov. and Streptomyces euryhalinus sp. nov., have been reported from this region. Several other actinomycetes were also isolated and a few bioactive compounds have been purified. Moreover, industrially important enzymes such as protease, esterase, and ribonucleases have been purified and characterized from bacteria isolated from the Sundarbans. Many halophilic cyanobacterial strains have been isolated; among them, Oxynema aestuarii sp. nov. was reported as a new cyanobacterial species. Further, the diversity of un-culturable bacteria and archaea of the Sundarbans have been explored by applying the metagenomic approach, and the sequence data have been analyzed using bioinformatics tools. Several studies have documented Proteobacteria as the dominant phylum, while Firmicutes, Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes, and Actinobacteria were found seasonally at different locations of the mangrove forest. Looking into the dynamic microbial community composition, the Sundarbans ecosystem has a great potential for the discovery of novel microbial species and deliver bioactive compounds for industrial, medical, and environmental applications.

2 citations


References
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Sep 1989-Botany
TL;DR: The fungi growing on the mangrove wood blocks showed a pattern of succession, with L. laevis as an early colonizer, D. parvus a late Colonizer, and A. parVus aLate colonizer.
Abstract: Randomly collected mangrove wood and wood blocks of Avicennia alba and Avicennia lanata submerged for 60 weeks in Mandai mangrove, Singapore, were investigated for marine fungi. Very frequent species on the random samples were Halosarpheia retorquens and Lignincola laevis and on the submerged wood blocks were Didymosphaeria enalia, Lignincola laevis, Lulworthia sp. 1, Aigialus parvus, Aniptodera marina, Halocyphina villosa, and Ascomycete No. 25. The fungi growing on the wood blocks showed a pattern of succession, with L. laevis as an early colonizer, D. enalia and Lulworthia sp. 1 intermediate colonizers, and A. parvus a late colonizer. The variations in the results obtained from the two sampling methods are also discussed.

67 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Mar 1995-Marine Ecology
Abstract: . Experiments were conducted to determine the decomposition rate of mangrove wood in two areas of differing water nutrient concentrations. Stakes were prepared from prop roots of Rhizophora inangle and from branches of Avicennia. Conocarpus and Lagguncularia. and tied in the natural habitat at two sites—Man-of-war Cay (high nutrient concentrations) and Twin Cays (low nutrient concentrations) — off the Belize coast. The stakes were retrieved after 4–24 months and the vertical zonation and succession of higher marine fungi was recorded. Consumption of wood by shipworms (Teredo bartschi), the major decomposers, was measured by digital analysis of the area of wood consumed by these boring organisms. Summary A total of 20 species of marine Ascomycotina, 2Basidiomycotina, and 6 anamorphic fungi were identified from the experimental stakes. Differences in species composition between the two sites of Twin Cays and Man-of-war Cay (Belize) were observed, as well as a certain degree of patterning in the vertical distribution of fungi. Among Ascomycotina, members of Halosphaeriales show a definite tendency to thrive at greater depths than other species. Mangrove decomposition by shipworms was clearly higher in the nutrient-rich waters of Man-of-war, where the stakes were already heavily riddled after 8 months and had mostly disappeared after 2 years, while they were still intact at the other site. No significant difference in degradation of the 4 species of mangroves was noted.

52 citations


Journal Article
01 Jan 1960-Nova Hedwigia

34 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Kevin D. Hyde, B.C. Sutton1
01 Mar 1992-Fungal Biology
TL;DR: Fungi from intertidal fronds of Nypa fruticans are described and compared with similar or related fungi.
Abstract: Nypaella frondicola gen. et sp. nov., Plectophomella nypae sp. nov. and Pleurophomopsis nypae sp. nov. (Coelomycetes) from intertidal fronds of Nypa fruticans are described and compared with similar or related fungi.

14 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Four species of the genus Aigialus are accepted and substrates from which they were recovered include submerged parts of Indian mangroves such as Avicennia alba, Rhizophora mucronata, Sonneratia acida and S. apetala.
Abstract: Four species of the genus Aigialus are accepted: A. parvus, A. grandis, A. mangrovis sp.nov. and A. rhizophorae sp.nov. Substrates from which they were recovered include submerged parts of Indian mangroves such as Avicennia alba, Rhizophora mucronata, Sonneratia acida and S. apetala , and intertidal wood of unidentified hosts in the Arabian Sea.

13 citations


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YearCitations
20191