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Sogdian Dictionary: Sogdian - Persian - English

01 Jan 1995-
About: The article was published on 1995-01-01 and is currently open access. It has received 34 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Persian.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A tour de horizon of the origin myths that were recorded in Chinese dynastic and other historical works written during the Turk era (552-ca. 744) and in subsequent official hist... as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: This article is a tour de horizon of the origin myths that were recorded in the Chinese dynastic and other historical works written during the Turk era (552–ca. 744) and in subsequent official hist...

19 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: A novel Bayesian approach is employed designed to overcome problems and tease apart the different determinants of irregularity in patterns of West Iranian sound change and provisionally resolve a number of outstanding questions in the literature on West Iranian dialectology concerning the dialectal affiliation of certain sound changes.
Abstract: This paper addresses a series of complex and unresolved issues in the historical phonology of West Iranian languages. The West Iranian languages (Persian, Kurdish, Balochi, and other languages) display a high degree of non-Lautgesetzlich behavior. Most of this irregularity is undoubtedly due to language contact; we argue, however, that an oversimplified view of the processes at work has prevailed in the literature on West Iranian dialectology, with specialists assuming that deviations from an expected outcome in a given non-Persian language are due to lexical borrowing from some chronological stage of Persian. It is demonstrated that this qualitative approach yields at times problematic conclusions stemming from the lack of explicit probabilistic inferences regarding the distribution of the data: Persian may not be the sole donor language; additionally, borrowing at the lexical level is not always the mechanism that introduces irregularity. In many cases, the possibility that West Iranian languages show different reflexes in different conditioning environments remains under-explored. We employ a novel Bayesian approach designed to overcome these problems and tease apart the different determinants of irregularity in patterns of West Iranian sound change. Our methodology allows us to provisionally resolve a number of outstanding questions in the literature on West Iranian dialectology concerning the dialectal affiliation of certain sound changes. We outline future directions for work of this sort.

10 citations


Cites background from "Sogdian Dictionary: Sogdian - Persi..."

  • ..., one finds S. Tati kelma ‘worm’ =NP kirm; S. Tati anjila (Yar-shater 1969:71), Vidari inˇil (Baghbidi 2005:36) = NP anj¯ır ‘fig’ (forms elsewhere in Iranian point to *r, e.g., Sogdian anč¯er, anj¯er; Gharib 1995:37). For ‘worm’, the evidence clearly points to an Indo-Iranian etymon *kr(i)mi- containing r, whatever the exact shape (cf. R ˚ g Vedic k´r ˚ mi-, Atharva Vedic krími-; Old Irish cruim), where any i...

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  • ...There are relatively few Proto-Iranian sources of the cluster *θn, but these are realized as šn across the board in West Iranian, to the exclusion of the possible Median proper name in Akkadian Pa-atni-e-ša- = Med *Paθn̄ıi “ ēša- < *paθn̄ı-aiša- ‘looking for a wife’ (Tavernier 2007:273).4 PIr *araTni- > OP arašni- ‘cubit’ > MP ārešn > NP ˘̄areš(n) PIr *dmāna-paTni- > MP, Parthian bāmbišn PIr *-i-Tna- > MP abstract noun suffix -išn > NP -iš; cf. Zazaki infinitive suffix -iš (Benveniste 1935:105) Middle Persian ārenč>NP āranj ‘elbow’ is most likely a loan from a source closely related to Sogdian (cf. ārinč)....

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  • ...This behavior is common in Middle and New Persian, perhaps representing a regular sound change which operated between Old and Middle Persian: PIr *́r ˚ d- > MP dil > NP dil ‘heart’ PIr *u “ (a)rda- > MP gul > NP gul ‘flower’ PIr *ćarda- > OP Tard- > MP sāl (MMP sār) > NP sāl ‘year’ PIr *p(a)rdanku->NP palang ‘panther’; cf. Vedic pŕ ˚ dāku- (withmeaning ‘leopard’ in the Paippalāda recension of the Atharva Veda, Zehnder 1999:59), Sogdian pwrδ’nk ‘panther, leopard’5 4A possible but highly unlikely exception is the OP form kr ˚ nuvaka- ‘stonemason’ (found in the Susa inscription of Darius, Schmitt 2009:133, 145), if from *kr ˚ t-nu-aka- following Kent (1942:80), though Kent (1951:180) is less certain regarding the presence of *-t- and other scholars (e.g., Brust 2018:163) make no mention of etymological *-t-; a pre-form *kr ˚ -nu-aka- is far more likely....

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  • ...Old Indic gan. á-) > NP gal(l)a ‘flock’ (Schwartz 1971:292, fn. 14) PIr *pr ˚ tu-→ *pr ˚ Tu- > MMP pwhl /puhl/ > NP p˘̄ul ‘bridge’ PIr *parću ˚ -→ *parT(a)u “ -a-ka- > MP pahlūg ‘side, rib’ > NP pahlū ‘side’ PIr *čaθu “ (a)r-ćat- (cf. Emmerick 1992:309) > PSWIr *čaTu “ r ˚ Tat- > MP čehel > NP čihil ‘forty’ (Emmerick 1992:309), Judeo-Tati čül (Authier 2012:88), cf. Zazaki čewres (Paul 1998a:61) In some cases, this development has operated across an intervening vowel, likely unstressed: PIr *ćar(a)-dāra- (Klingenschmitt 2000:194) > Phl ‘Träger der Mund; Oberster’ sālār (MMP sārār ‘leader’) > NP sālār ‘leader’ (cf. NP sar-dār, perhaps a later compound) PIr *pari-dāna-> NP pālān ‘pack-saddle’ (cf. Sogdian pyrδnn ‘saddle’, Sims-Williams cf. 1989:181) PIr *pari-daía- > NP pālēz ‘garden’ (Cheung 2007:53) However, this development is not exceptionless: it does not operate in forms like NP padarzah ‘a wrapper in which clothes are folded up’, if from *pari-daŕ-aka- (Cheung 2007:63, marked as a loanword perhaps due to z < *́), which appears to have undergone a dissimilatory development r...r > ∅...r that is not paralleled in *ćar(a)-dāra-....

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  • ...It is not clear, for example, where forms like S. Tati (Ebrahim-abadi) nālbanda ∼ (Sagz-abadi) nārbanda ‘elm’ (Yar-shater 1969:71) = NP nārvan belong.10 Similarly, one finds S. Tati kelma ‘worm’ = NP kirm; S. Tati anjila (Yar-shater 1969:71), Vidari iňil (Baghbidi 2005:36) = NP anj̄ır ‘fig’ (forms elsewhere in Iranian point to *r, e.g., Sogdian ančēr, anjēr; Gharib 1995:37)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Astāngahrdayasamhitā (AHS), one of the most important works on Old Indian medicine (āyurveda), is unattested in Central Asia and several fragments of the Berlin Turfan collection, however, can be attributed to an Uighur translation.
Abstract: The Astāngahrdayasamhitā (AHS), one of the most important works on Old Indian medicine (āyurveda), is unattested in Central Asia. Several fragments of the Berlin Turfan collection, however, can be attributed to an Uighur translation. They are edited, translated, commented on and provided with glossaries. Special attention is paid to the translation technique.

7 citations


Additional excerpts

  • ...96 Cf. OTWF 215....

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  • ...117 Cf. EtymDic 792 b, OTWF 266....

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  • ...This is a second case of the vocalisation ü—ö besides süzök (TT VIII C 6), whose conclusiveness regarding primary *O in nonfirst syllables was questioned on occasion, cf. Maue 1996, p. XX. 47 Cf. Maue 1996, p. XXIX with fn. 129; frequent in Hartmann and Maue 1996, p.155: U 6862 r 7 f. with remarks on pp. 156 f. 48 MW 1038 b. 49 BT IX, 2 115 a. 50 OTWF 619....

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  • ...65 S. UigWb 354 b. 66 S. UigWb 294 f. 67 Cf. e.g. BHS-D 170 b, SWTF II 31 a; for the systematic context, see Lamotte 1976, p. 37....

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  • ...192 Cf. EtymDic 825 a. 193 Cf. EtymDic 619 a. 194 Quotation (in our transcription) and translation from EtymDic 488 b. 195 Palatal variant of bıš- occuring also elsewhere in the Turcia, cf. EtymDic 376 b. Downloaded from Brill.com06/24/2019 10:49:19PM via free access ‘laziness-disease’ could be given the role of an instrumental case....

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Journal ArticleDOI
23 Jul 2013-Bilig
TL;DR: In this article, the attributive functions of noun phrases and subordinating clauses are investigated in Turkish in the context of dependency model (dependency tree) developed by Tesniere's Dependency Grammar Theory.
Abstract: In the general system of the natural tongues, attribution, which undertakes the function of cluster restriction and cluster equipment, can be categorized in two main groups, namely, noun phrases and subordinate clauses. The process of cluster restriction is realized by way of the reduction of the number of elements in the cluster, to which a concept has been attributed, based on a certain characteristic. In the function of cluster equipment, the dimensions of a given concept remain unchanged. However, this concept can be enriched through a number additional attribution to be equipped. Noun phrases are determinative phrases, which report no judgement and which are constructed from more than one word aggregated around a head noun. In the general sequence of Turkish language, the simplest attributive phrase is the adjective phrase made up of adjective and noun. An adjective ascribes some property, quality or status to the entity denoted by a noun. When adjectives attribute nouns, they become attributive adjectives, and when they attribute the action they become adverbs of manner. Relative clauses with adjectival function are complicated structures which attribute noun phrases, and they are generally constructed by taking participle suffixes like -(y)An, DIK (-DIgI), mIs, or -(y)AcAK (-EcEgI). Relative clauses precede the noun phrase they modify, in the same way that adjectives precede the noun they modify. In this study an argument has been made about how the attributive functions of noun phrases and subordinating clauses are realized, and the structural characteristics of attribution in Turkish in the context of dependency model (dependency tree) developed by Tesniere’s Dependency Grammar Theory have been investigated.

6 citations