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Journal ArticleDOI

Sound and Epistemology in Film

01 Sep 1989-The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism (Oxford University Press (OUP))-Vol. 47, Iss: 4, pp 311-324
About: This article is published in The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism.The article was published on 1989-09-01. It has received 32 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Sound (geography).
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01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: Hietanen et al. as mentioned in this paper developed a possible ontology and epistemology for conducting and expressing research on video media, which is based on the philosophy of cinematography, and developed concrete approaches from three earlier videographic projects to bring these abstract notions into practice by utilizing various aesthetics of the moving image.
Abstract: Aalto University, P.O. Box 11000, FI-00076 Aalto www.aalto.fi Author Joel Hietanen Name of the doctoral dissertation Videography in Consumer Culture Theory: An Account of Essence(s) and Production Publisher School of Economics Unit Department of Marketing Series Aalto University publication series DOCTORAL DISSERTATIONS 78/2012 Field of research Consumer Culture Theory (CCT) Abstract Liberated into the online virtual spaces through digitalization, video media has become an omnipresent part of our lives. Simultaneously, the videographic method for conducting and expressing ethnographic research has received increasing attention in the field of consumer culture theory (CCT). Yet, as is the usual case with nascent and still marginal research orientations, the publications about the method have been relatively descriptive, and thus have not explored the potential of the approach from a philosophical perspective. This dissertation addresses this gap and develops a possible ontology and epistemology for conducting and expressing research on video media. How is videographic expression different compared to text and photography? What could it be like to experience it? While such a philosophical account of essence(s) in video work in CCT calls for establishment, there is also a need to further consider issues about the production of videographic research on a workbench level, i.e. what the production of such visual ethnographic research is like. In this study an epistemology of videographic relation is constructed, in a bricolage fashion, by adapting ‘postmodern’ perspectives from ‘poststructuralist’, ‘radical humanist’ and a Deleuzian ‘superior empiricist’ perspectives. This Deleuzian approach eschews the objectifying and Cartesian logic of representation and any correspondence between video and a reality that is often attributed to the videographic image. Instead, I will present possibilities for evocative relations of affect and embodiment that have the potential to emancipate thought and thus constitute an efficacious relation towards the world. Adopting key notions from Deleuzian philosophy of cinematography, I will also provide concrete approaches from my three earlier videographic projects, in order to bring these abstract notions into practice by utilizing various aesthetics of the moving image, thus extending the toolkit of aspiring videography researchers in CCT.Liberated into the online virtual spaces through digitalization, video media has become an omnipresent part of our lives. Simultaneously, the videographic method for conducting and expressing ethnographic research has received increasing attention in the field of consumer culture theory (CCT). Yet, as is the usual case with nascent and still marginal research orientations, the publications about the method have been relatively descriptive, and thus have not explored the potential of the approach from a philosophical perspective. This dissertation addresses this gap and develops a possible ontology and epistemology for conducting and expressing research on video media. How is videographic expression different compared to text and photography? What could it be like to experience it? While such a philosophical account of essence(s) in video work in CCT calls for establishment, there is also a need to further consider issues about the production of videographic research on a workbench level, i.e. what the production of such visual ethnographic research is like. In this study an epistemology of videographic relation is constructed, in a bricolage fashion, by adapting ‘postmodern’ perspectives from ‘poststructuralist’, ‘radical humanist’ and a Deleuzian ‘superior empiricist’ perspectives. This Deleuzian approach eschews the objectifying and Cartesian logic of representation and any correspondence between video and a reality that is often attributed to the videographic image. Instead, I will present possibilities for evocative relations of affect and embodiment that have the potential to emancipate thought and thus constitute an efficacious relation towards the world. Adopting key notions from Deleuzian philosophy of cinematography, I will also provide concrete approaches from my three earlier videographic projects, in order to bring these abstract notions into practice by utilizing various aesthetics of the moving image, thus extending the toolkit of aspiring videography researchers in CCT. Keywords videography, visual ethnography, Deleuze, poststructuralism, radical humanism, practice theory, non-represational theory, relation ISBN (printed) 978-952-60-4661-7 ISBN (pdf) 978-952-60-4662-4 ISSN-L 1799-4934 ISSN (printed) 1799-4934 ISSN (pdf) 1799-4942 Location of publisher Espoo Location of printing Helsinki Year 2012 Pages 233 i Acknowledgements First and foremost I wish to thank our department head at the Aalto School of Economics Department of Marketing, professor and my supervisor Henrikki Tikkanen, for not only allowing but also actively supporting this unorthodox and unconventional work. His passion is the true passion of an academic – to not be content with the status quo, but to actively criticize and develop scholarly discussion. I was also honored with the renowned professors Russell Belk (York University) and Jeff Murray (University of Arkansas) serving as the preliminary examiners for my work. Their comments, not to mention encouragement have been invaluable. I wish to extend my gratitude to assistant professor Joonas Rokka, who by some fortuitous happenstance stumbled on the idea to conduct videographic research in the first place. He is a mildly mannered man who does not shy away from a challenge. I wish to also extend my heartfelt gratitude to all the international scholars I have had the fortune to cross paths with. Thank you for further blowing life on the flame of unconventional approaches to consumer research. I especially mean you guys, professors Robert Kozinets, John Schouten, Diane Martin, Avi Shankar, Markus Giesler, Robin Canniford, Marylouise Caldwell, Paul Henry, Eric Arnould, Sammy Toyoki, Kristine De Valck, Alexandre Schwob, Johanna Moisander and Geoffrey Easton. Professor Tikkanen was all for employing interesting and curious people. One such recruitment was Henri Weijo, with whom I have had my most interesting (and sometimes also quite heated) theoretical discussions. Our work will go on! The same applies to Antti Sihvonen, Sammy Toyoki, Mikko Laukkanen, Andrei Botez, Juho-Petteri Huhtala, Jari Salo and Anastasia Seregina (to mention just a few from our fantastic and fascinating faculty), who always performed the role of trustworthy sounding boards for developing many of my nascent ideas. In addition, I wish to extend my heartfelt thanks to Metropolitan of Helsinki, Ambrosius for his support during these years and his help with organizing the day of the defense. I wish to also thank all of my collaborators. Joonas and Kristine you already know, the other video enthusiasts were, to name only a few, Risto Roman, Hannu Uotila, Karolus Viitala, Henri Myöhänen, Niklas Lindroos and Elina Koivisto. Whether from the doctoral student circles or from my Master’s Thesis seminar group on videography, thank you for all for our travels! I’m sure that further congregations will follow. In addition, I am indebted by all the support given to me by the Department of Marketing and various initiatives, most notably MediaMark heralded by professor Pekka Mattila. He has been a great supporter of this work and has

15 citations

01 Jan 2013
TL;DR: A submitted manuscript is the version of the article upon submission and before peer-review as mentioned in this paper, while a published version is the final layout of the paper including the volume, issue and page numbers.
Abstract: • A submitted manuscript is the version of the article upon submission and before peer-review. There can be important differences between the submitted version and the official published version of record. People interested in the research are advised to contact the author for the final version of the publication, or visit the DOI to the publisher's website. • The final author version and the galley proof are versions of the publication after peer review. • The final published version features the final layout of the paper including the volume, issue and page numbers.

11 citations

Book Chapter
01 Jan 2007

9 citations