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Journal ArticleDOI

Speakers' Ambivalent Attitude toward Philippine English: An Issue for Integrating the Variety into ESL Instruction

TL;DR: In this article , the authors present a revisit to the literature that suggests the issue of its speakers' attitude towards it and argue that these PhilE users' ambivalence and unwelcoming attitude toward their English variety possibly hinder the Commission on Higher Education and the Department of Education (DepEd) from integrating the variety into the English language curricula.
Abstract: Philippine English (PhilE) evolution and its roles have brought challenges and issues to the Philippines' English Language Teaching (ELT) classrooms. Filipino ESL teachers are confronted by issues regarding the appropriate variety to teach and whether or not the local variety should be taught or integrated into the teaching of American English (AmE) or British English (BrE) varieties. World Englishes (WE) and PhilE scholars have asserted the variety's legitimacy and intelligibility, and some have been recommending the integration of the variety into the teaching of ESL and assimilating it in English language programs of all curricular levels from elementary to college. However, studies suggest that the PhilE paradigm is not reflected in the country's English curriculum blueprint and college English textbooks. This conceptual paper presents a revisit to PhilE literature that suggests the issue of its speakers' attitude towards it. It claims that ESL teachers and students have an ambivalent attitude toward PhilE and are not yet open to celebrating its existence. It argues that these PhilE users' ambivalence and unwelcoming attitude toward their English variety possibly hinder the Commission on Higher Education (CHED) and the Department of Education (DepEd) from integrating the variety into the English language curricula.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: However, this article found that English is still being taught as an inner-circle language, based almost exclusively on American or British English, and textbooks with characters and cultural topics from the English-speaking countries of the inner circle.
Abstract: 0 The discussion of World Englishes in the applied linguistics profession for the most part accepts multiple varieties of English as legitimate and worthy of study even if legitimacy remains the object of inquiry (see Higgins's article in this issue). Consistent with the value applied linguists place on World Englishes, English is taught and learned in many countries because it is an-and arguably the-international language. English is seen by many in Japan, for example, as a means to open doors to parts of the world that are not accessible to them otherwise, and learners are fascinated by the increased international opportunities they believe the knowledge of English will bring to them (Matsuda, 2002, in press). The international scope of learners' English learning agenda should logically be matched by pedagogical approaches that teach English as an international language (EIL), in part through inclusion of varieties of World Englishes. However, examination of English language teaching (ELT) practices in Japan reveals that English is still being taught as an inner-circle language, based almost exclusively on American or British English, and textbooks with characters and cultural topics from the English-speaking countries of the inner circle (Iwata et al., 2002; Kiryu, Shibata, Tagaya, & Wada, 1999; Matsuda, 2002). Issues associated with teaching English as an inner-circle language versus EIL need to be clarified if concrete changes are to be brought about in the way English is portrayed, valued, and taught in expandingcircle countries where it is not the native language of the majority or an official language. In this commentary, I therefore draw on research conducted in Japan (Matsuda, 2002) to demonstrate ways in which current practices in ELT teach English as an inner-circle language, why this approach to ELT is not appropriate in view of the curricular goals and learners' needs, and how World Englishes can be incorporated to teach EIL.

309 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

280 citations

Book
01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: A comprehensive treatment of the spread, acculturation, functions, and evolution of English in Asia is given in this article, where the authors discuss the issues resulting from the introduction of English to culturally different contexts and the two-way interaction of English and local languages in Asia.
Abstract: A comprehensive treatment of the spread, acculturation, functions, and evolution of English in Asia, this book discusses the issues resulting from the introduction of English in culturally different contexts and the two-way interaction of English and local languages in Asia. It is useful for those interested in English studies and world Englishes.

215 citations

Trending Questions (3)
What are some common challenges that Filipinos face when communicating in English?

Filipinos face challenges in deciding whether to integrate Philippine English into ESL instruction due to ambivalent attitudes towards the variety, hindering its inclusion in English curricula.

How may insecurities impact English language learning in the Phillippines?

Insecurities among Filipino ESL teachers and students towards Philippine English may hinder its integration into English language curricula, impacting English language learning in the Philippines.