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Speaking Up: A History of Language and Politics in Canada and Quebec

29 Oct 2012-
About: The article was published on 2012-10-29 and is currently open access. It has received 11 citations till now.
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DissertationDOI
01 Jan 2017
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a Table of Table of contents of the paper "Acknowledgements and acknowledgements of the authors of this paper: https://www.goprocessor.org/
Abstract: .......................................................................................................................................... ii Acknowledgements ........................................................................................................................ iii Table of

55 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors evaluate a recently available four-factor conceptualization of justice beliefs in samples of university students from the United States, Canada, India, and China (total N = 922) and find that individuals from all four cultures could be characterized according to their beliefs about distributive and procedural justice for both self and others.
Abstract: Tendencies to believe in justice are multidimensional, and some justice beliefs enhance personal well-being. These features suggest a considerable but largely overlooked potential for similarities and differences in the structure, endorsement, and wellness-promoting functions of justice beliefs across cultures. In the current research, we evaluate a recently available four-factor conceptualization of justice beliefs in samples of university students from the United States, Canada, India, and China (total N = 922). Multigroup confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated that the proposed four-factor model was structurally invariant, suggesting that individuals from all four cultures could be characterized according to their beliefs about distributive and procedural justice for both self and others. Cross-cultural comparisons revealed no mean differences in beliefs about distributive justice for self, whereas beliefs about procedural justice for self were higher in Canada and China than in the United States or...

23 citations


Cites background from "Speaking Up: A History of Language ..."

  • ...Crisp justice distinctions may be useful in India and Canada both to defuse potential intergroup tensions, and to facilitate effective and frequently occurring multicultural interactions, which may be less common in the United States and China (for a related discussion, Martel & Pâquet, 2012)....

    [...]

MonographDOI
14 Dec 2017
TL;DR: The authors proposed an integrated framework for the study of normative language policy, combining recent normative work on language in political theory and philosophy with empirically-derived insight from the fields of sociolinguistics and applied linguistics.
Abstract: Language politics in the new global era presents policymakers with significant ethical challenges. How should the reality of English as a global language influence the normative considerations underpinning national language policies? What moral arguments justify the imposition of national languages in an era of increased immigration and ethnolinguistic diversity? What role is there for non-dominant varieties in a globalised world? Building on the emerging notion of 'normative language policy', this book proposes an integrated framework for the study of such questions, combining recent normative work on language in political theory and philosophy with empirically-derived insight from the fields of sociolinguistics and applied linguistics. The case of Quebec forms the backdrop of the study, providing a particularly illuminating setting for investigating the common moral challenges that face contemporary polities seeking to maintain distinct linguistic identities, in an irreducibly diverse world increasingly dominated by English as a global lingua franca.

21 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examines the Conservative government's approach to official languages, through a policy instrument framework, and concludes that an analysis of language roadmaps elucidates transformations initiated by the Conservative governments in the area of official languages in Canada.
Abstract: This article critically examines the Conservative government's approach to official languages, through a policy instrument framework. Special attention is paid to the third federal roadmap for official languages—the first having been unveiled by the Liberal government in 2003 and the second by the Conservative minority government in 2008—and how this roadmap conveys a new representation of official languages in relation to Canadian identity and citizenship. The focus on the linguistic integration of new immigrants in the 2013 language roadmap generates interest. The policy instrument framework also shows how language roadmaps represent the fourth generation of official language policies in Canada; the first three generations found their respective bases in the 1969 Official Languages Act, the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the 1988 Official Languages Act. The article concludes that an analysis of language roadmaps elucidates transformations initiated by the Conservative governments in the area of official languages in Canada. It also promotes further exploration and analysis of language policies through the policy instrument framework.

15 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article explored the present state of linguistic intergroup tensions in Canada to contribute to the understanding of outgroup attitudes among minorities and majorities and found that cultural threat impacts outgroup sentiment in both the national minority and the national majority.
Abstract: Intergroup sentiments have been shown to be an important determinant of social stability in multinational countries. The present study explores the present state of linguistic intergroup tensions in Canada to contribute to the understanding of outgroup attitudes among minorities and majorities. Four main findings are derived from the results of empirical analyses on survey data. (1) Cultural threat impacts outgroup attitudes in both the national minority and the national majority. (2) Education has a strong impact on feelings towards the linguistic outgroup. (3) Unexpectedly, age does not display a statistical influence on intergroup attitudes. (4) Specifically relating to Canada, intergroup feelings between Francophones and Anglophones have over the last quarter century become considerably more positive, both groups hold quite positive attitudes towards one another.

13 citations