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Journal ArticleDOI

State-of-the-art adsorption and adsorptive filtration based technologies for the removal of trace elements: A critical review.

TL;DR: In this article , a state-of-the-art review provides and combines the advancements in different conventional and advanced adsorents, biosorbents, and adsorptive membranes for the removal of trace elements from water streams.
About: This article is published in Science of The Total Environment.The article was published on 2023-06-21. It has received None citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Medicine & Adsorption.
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15 Aug 1990
TL;DR: The state of the art in the field of biosorption is reviewed, with many references to recent reviews and key individual contributions, and the composition of marine algae polysaccharide structures, which seem instrumental in metal uptake and binding are discussed.
Abstract: Only within the past decade has the potential of metal biosorption by biomass materials been well established. For economic reasons, of particular interest are abundant biomass types generated as a waste byproduct of large-scale industrial fermentations or certain metal-binding algae found in large quantities in the sea. These biomass types serve as a basis for newly developed metal biosorption processes foreseen particularly as a very competitive means for the detoxification of metal-bearing industrial effluents. The assessment of the metal-binding capacity of some new biosorbents is discussed. Lead and cadmium, for instance, have been effectively removed from very dilute solutions by the dried biomass of some ubiquitous species of brown marine algae such as Ascophyllum and Sargassum, which accumulate more than 30% of biomass dry weight in the metal. Mycelia of the industrial steroid-transforming fungi Rhizopus and Absidia are excellent biosorbents for lead, cadmium, copper, zinc, and uranium and also bind other heavy metals up to 25% of the biomass dry weight. Biosorption isotherm curves, derived from equilibrium batch sorption experiments, are used in the evaluation of metal uptake by different biosorbents. Further studies are focusing on the assessment of biosorbent performance in dynamic continuous-flow sorption systems. In the course of this work, new methodologies are being developed that are aimed at mathematical modeling of biosorption systems and their effective optimization. Elucidation of mechanisms active in metal biosorption is essential for successful exploitation of the phenomenon and for regeneration of biosorbent materials in multiple reuse cycles. The complex nature of biosorbent materials makes this task particularly challenging. Discussion focuses on the composition of marine algae polysaccharide structures, which seem instrumental in metal uptake and binding. The state of the art in the field of biosorption is reviewed in this article, with many references to recent reviews and key individual contributions.

3,388 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Ming Hua1, Shujuan Zhang1, Bingcai Pan1, Weiming Zhang1, Lu Lv1, Quanxing Zhang1 
TL;DR: The present review mainly focuses on NMOs' preparation, their physicochemical properties, adsorption characteristics and mechanism, as well as their application in heavy metal removal.

1,828 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This review focuses on recent progress in reported MOFs and MOF-based composites as superior adsorbents for the efficient removal of toxic and nuclear waste-related metal ions.
Abstract: Highly efficient removal of metal ion pollutants, such as toxic and nuclear waste-related metal ions, remains a serious task from the biological and environmental standpoint because of their harmful effects on human health and the environment. Recently, highly porous metal–organic frameworks (MOFs), with excellent chemical stability and abundant functional groups, have represented a new addition to the area of capturing various types of hazardous metal ion pollutants. This review focuses on recent progress in reported MOFs and MOF-based composites as superior adsorbents for the efficient removal of toxic and nuclear waste-related metal ions. Aspects related to the interaction mechanisms between metal ions and MOF-based materials are systematically summarized, including macroscopic batch experiments, microscopic spectroscopy analysis, and theoretical calculations. The adsorption properties of various MOF-based materials are assessed and compared with those of other widely used adsorbents. Finally, we propose our personal insights into future research opportunities and challenges in the hope of stimulating more researchers to engage in this new field of MOF-based materials for environmental pollution management.

1,327 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Biosorption is becoming a potential alternative to the existing technologies for the removal and/or recovery of toxic metals from wastewater and its effectiveness in reducing the concentration of heavy metal ions to very low levels is effective.

1,321 citations