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Proceedings ArticleDOI

States of Being: Art and identity in digital space and time

TL;DR: This one-day Symposium explored themes of personhood, modernity and digital art, bringing together speakers from a range of disciplines to consider technology, artistic practice and society.
Abstract: This one-day Symposium explored themes of personhood, modernity and digital art, bringing together speakers from a range of disciplines to consider technology, artistic practice and society. It seeks a renewed consideration of the role of art in illuminating human identity in a positive relation with technology, and its transformative effects upon space and time. The concerns for the role of art amidst the forces of a post-modern world are influenced by important legacies of the past, by which ideas about human identity and difference have been made meaningful in the relation of history and technology. In the frequently transient and conflicting forces of humanness and forces of modernity, the digital world of the arts emerges as a means by which new ideas of space and time can be considered, with new perspectives of human identity seen as states of being, towards the possibilities of experience, technology, individuality and society.

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Citations
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2019
TL;DR: This chapter looks at the relationship between external digital life of museum goers with the internal museum environment aligned more with the pre-digital world than with contemporary culture.
Abstract: The distinguishing characteristic of digitalism is its focus on human behavior in cultural and social contexts. When we think of the developments of computer science and “information theory” that spawned the digital revolution, the focus generally defaults to digital tools and technology, as opposed to its effects on human life and culture and how advances in computing, digital communications and technology are transforming our ways of doing, seeing, knowing, learning, living and loving, to name a few examples. The impact of digitalism is all encompassing, touching all disciplines and human pursuits. How will museums change and transform themselves to connect in authentic ways with their communities while remaining relevant in a world transformed by digital culture that is moving full speed ahead, advancing in a state of constant change and development? While museums have been cautious and relatively slow to challenge traditional ways, they are surely noticing that we are reaching a digital tipping point of sorts that demands digital thinking and strategy to keep pace with evolving states of digital being, aesthetics, seeing and identity in world where everyone is connected to an all-encompassing digital ecosystem of shared networks and platforms. Although museums might argue that this shift to digital culture steeped in a user-centric model might be a costly one, not moving in this direction with a sense of timeliness becomes a far riskier strategy, being one that lacks consonance with museum audiences, and is out of synch with contemporary and digital life. This chapter looks at the relationship between external digital life of museum goers with the internal museum environment aligned more with the pre-digital world than with contemporary culture. How will museums recalibrate the gap between the visitors’ digital self and the museums physical identity? And, how will they revision the gallery experience for visitor learning, interaction, and participation? Will museums proceed fearlessly into digital life and art, embracing change, and the digital aesthetics and social milieu of the 21st century?

9 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Jul 2017
TL;DR: Digital Futures (Papadimitriou 2016) is a mobile and open platform for displaying and discussing work by researchers, artists, designers, companies and other professionals working with art, technology, design, science and beyond.
Abstract: Digital Futures (Papadimitriou 2016) is a mobile and open platform for displaying and discussing work by researchers, artists, designers, companies and other professionals working with art, technology, design, science and beyond. The programme started at the V&A in 2012 in order to enable collaboration and exchange, but also to create a flexible space to share artistic processes, academic research and engage with art, design, technology and contemporary issues. Bringing together people from different backgrounds and disciplines has been a central part to the programme. Digital Futures is not fixed to a place; instead, it is an open and mobile platform that changes continuously depending on participants, partners, themes and more, and exploring ideas from different perspectives.

6 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2019
TL;DR: This chapter discusses possible directions that museums could take with respect to the rapidly developing digital culture in which they find themselves and speculate how museums could adapt to survive in the digital environment that is increasingly integrated as part of the real environment.
Abstract: We discuss possible directions that museums could take with respect to the rapidly developing digital culture in which they find themselves. Successful museums must be very adaptable to the changing nature of public expectations. Some of the important aspects to be considered have been covered in earlier chapters in this book. Here we take this knowledge and speculate how museums could adapt to survive in the digital environment that is increasingly integrated as part of the real environment, in what will rapidly become a postdigital world. The chapter summarizes the prospective directions for museums and related institutions in the context of changes in the digital landscape of the rest of society.

6 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2019
TL;DR: This chapter explores how education for museum professionals is transforming, as it responds to the need for graduates to possess digital skills and a deep knowledge and understanding of the social and cultural contexts in which museums are evolving.
Abstract: As the digital revolution accelerates, one of the most significant impacts that museums are experiencing, is how digital development is changing the very nature of work across the professions and disciplines from art and humanities to computer science and technology. Simply put—work and life are merging and becoming increasingly digital and cross-disciplinary, as they are absorbed into the digital ecosystem. Museums are recognizing that the digital shift is causing them to re-think the skills and knowledge their professional staff needs and are challenged to find effective strategies to respond to changes brought about by digital culture and related social and cultural issues, while graduate education for museum professionals is similarly challenged. As a case study, we consider Pratt Institute’s Master of Science in Museums and Digital Culture, introduced in 2015 by Giannini. Representing the first master’s degree of its kind, it offers a program set in a digital framework that encompasses the full range of museum activities and functions in contrast to the prevalent museum studies model taking a more traditional collection-centered approach. Over the past few years, the work of museum professionals behind the scenes has become increasingly carried out using digital tools and technologies, from collection management including digitization and access, to museum websites and social media, while using digital in galleries and exhibitions is an emerging area of critical focus aimed at developing digital strategies and methods for visitor engagement and experience and that expand the roles and responsibilities of museum professionals. Among digital advances, augmented and virtual reality, digital storytelling and artificial intelligence, are entering the mainstream of museum life, more fully immersing museums in the digital culture ecosystem. This chapter explores how education for museum professionals is transforming, as it responds to the need for graduates to possess digital skills and a deep knowledge and understanding of the social and cultural contexts in which museums are evolving.

4 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Jul 2019
TL;DR: These trends are traced, illustrating them using recent examples of art and activism at museums in New York and London, and strategies for museums to collaborate with their community and find common ground are explored.
Abstract: Once quiet places protected by walls, museums are increasingly besieged by activist groups. Spurred by social and political causes, they storm the gates bypassing the gatekeepers, to deliver their message and insist that museums become relevant, participatory and interactive, and give voice to their communities and audience. With no place to hide in a sea of digital connections, museums are challenged to find new directions and strategies for the post-digital world. This paper traces these trends, illustrating them using recent examples of art and activism at museums in New York and London, and explores strategies for museums to collaborate with their community and find common ground.

4 citations


Cites background from "States of Being: Art and identity i..."

  • ...In Bowen et al. (2018), pp. 1–7....

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  • ...Acknowledgements This paper has taken inspiration from a recent book (Giannini & Bowen 2019) and previous EVA London papers (Bowen et al. 2017; 2018; Giannini & Bowen 2016; 2017; 2018)....

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  • ...In Bowen et al. (2018), pp. 172–179....

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References
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Book
01 Feb 2018
TL;DR: In Inner Sound as mentioned in this paper, the authors explore the creative influence of altered states of consciousness in electronic music and audio-visual media, and propose a conceptual model for ASCs, which describes how sound can be used to simulate various subjective states from a first-person perspective.
Abstract: Over the last century, developments in electronic music and art have enabled new possibilities for creating audio and audio-visual artworks. With this new potential has come the possibility for representing subjective internal conscious states, such as the experience of hallucinations, using digital technology. Combined with immersive technologies such as virtual reality goggles and high-quality loudspeakers, the potential for accurate simulations of conscious encounters such as Altered States of Consciousness (ASCs) is rapidly advancing. In Inner Sound, author Jonathan Weinel traverses the creative influence of ASCs, from Amazonian chicha festivals to the synaesthetic assaults of neon raves; and from an immersive outdoor electroacoustic performance on an Athenian hilltop to a mushroom trip on a tropical island in virtual reality. Beginning with a discussion of consciousness, the book explores how our subjective realities may change during states of dream, psychedelic experience, meditation, and trance. Taking a broad view across a wide range of genres, Inner Sound draws connections between shamanic art and music, and the modern technoshamanism of psychedelic rock, electronic dance music, and electroacoustic music. Going beyond the sonic into the visual, the book also examines the role of altered states in film, visual music, VJ performances, interactive video games, and virtual reality applications. Through the analysis of these examples, Weinel uncovers common mechanisms, and ultimately proposes a conceptual model for Altered States of Consciousness Simulations (ASCSs). This theoretical model describes how sound can be used to simulate various subjective states of consciousness from a first-person perspective, in an interactive context. Throughout the book, the ethical issues regarding altered states of consciousness in electronic music and audio-visual media are also examined, ultimately allowing the reader not only to consider the design of ASCSs, but also the implications of their use for digital society.

25 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
08 Jul 2014
TL;DR: Examples of the phenomenon of the "digital bubble" are explored, within the context of the arts in particular and culture in general, and the assortment of terms used in a variety of ways by researchers in different fields with regard to the authors' ever more digital society are considered.
Abstract: Today's society is increasingly digitalised, with mobile smartphones being routinely carried and used by a significant percentage of the population. This provides an augmented experience for the individual that does not depend on their geographical separation with respect to their community of friends and other contacts. This changes the nature of relationships between people. Individuals may live in a "digital bubble", close to others physically, but far away from them in their digital world. More specifically, digital images can be generated and shared with ever greater ease. Sometimes the digital image takes on an important part of the individual's experience of reality. This paper explores examples of the phenomenon, within the context of the arts in particular and culture in general. We also consider the assortment of terms used in a variety of ways by researchers in different fields with regard to our ever more digital society, such as digitalism, digitality, digitalisation, digital culture, digital philosophy, etc. We survey these terms, exploring them from alternative viewpoints, including sociological and philosophical aspects, and attempt to pinpoint some of these terms more precisely, especially in a cultural and artistic context.

24 citations


"States of Being: Art and identity i..." refers background in this paper

  • ...She has previously presented at the EVA London 2017 Conference (Giannini 2013; Bowen & Giannini 2014; Giannini & Bowen 2015; 2016; 2017) and co-chaired the previous EVA London Symposia (Bowen & Giannini 2016; Bowen, Giannini & Polmeer 2017)....

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  • ...The Symposium started in association with the Pratt Institute London Sumer School, with an emphasis on digital culture and heritage (Bowen & Giannini 2014; Giannini & Bowen 2016)....

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Proceedings ArticleDOI
12 Jul 2016
TL;DR: This study presents specific examples of how artists and GLAM institutions are adapting to new digital ways of curating collections and conveying meaning, and shows how notions of what constitutes artistic expression are evolving as art traverses digital media boundaries, especially in terms of visual and textual media.
Abstract: The space between digital life and real life continues to fade and nowhere is this more apparent than in arts and cultural contexts. Facilitated by digital capture and curation, social media, the network, Internet, and the web, these forces combine to empower artists to be digital curators of their own work, giving voice and narration to their artistic expression. In the paper entitled Digitalism: the New Realism, the authors focus on how digital tools and technology have changed ways of doing, knowing, and being, while here we look at how today's digital landscape is changing ways of artistic expression, narration, communication, and human interaction. The growing use of digital tools and technology in the arts and culture is dramatically transforming traditional curatorial practice and by extension archival practice, so that we are moving from a gatekeeping model to an open model steeped in digital relationships across global networks and the Internet. As we immerse ourselves in the digital world, where anyone with a smartphone can be a digital curator and marshal a range of Internet services, such as Instagram, Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and more specifically for example Behance (for online portfolios), artists are enabled to freely engage and interact with their audience using to their advantage crowdsourcing, "likes", chat, blogs, games and email. Emerging artists are particularly expert digitally and are able to curate their life and work directly, living naturally between physical and digital states. To demonstrate this, our study presents specific examples of how artists and GLAM (Galleries, Libraries, Archives, and Museum) institutions are adapting to new digital ways of curating collections and conveying meaning. Additionally, we show how notions of what constitutes artistic expression are evolving as art traverses digital media boundaries, especially in terms of visual and textual media. Importantly, as life in the 21st century plays out on the digital stage of the Internet, artists and GLAM institutions find themselves more than ever working at the intersection of art and information which is leading to new and innovative ways of curating contemporary art that are expressive of artistic vision and digital aesthetics, while conveying social and political meaning capable of influencing and impacting our lives.

17 citations


"States of Being: Art and identity i..." refers background in this paper

  • ...She has previously presented at the EVA London 2017 Conference (Giannini 2013; Bowen & Giannini 2014; Giannini & Bowen 2015; 2016; 2017) and co-chaired the previous EVA London Symposia (Bowen & Giannini 2016; Bowen, Giannini & Polmeer 2017)....

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  • ...The Symposium started in association with the Pratt Institute London Sumer School, with an emphasis on digital culture and heritage (Bowen & Giannini 2014; Giannini & Bowen 2016)....

    [...]

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Jul 2017
TL;DR: How digital life is increasingly becoming part of real life for more and more people around the world, especially with respect to the arts, culture, and heritage is examined.
Abstract: Claude Shannon (1916–2001) is regarded as the father of information theory. Alan Turing (1912–1954) is known as the father of computer science. In the year 1943, Shannon and Turing were both at Bell Labs in New York City, although working on different projects. They had discussions together, including about Turing’s “Universal Machine,” a type of computational brain. Turing seems quite surprised that in a sea of code and computers, Shannon envisioned the arts and culture as an integral part of the digital revolution – a digital DNA of sorts. What was dreamlike in 1943, is today a reality, as digital representation of all media, accounts for millions of “cultural things” and massive music collections. The early connections that Shannon made between the arts, information, and computing, intuit the future that we are experiencing today. This paper considers foundational aspects of the digital revolution, the current state, and the possible future. It examines how digital life is increasingly becoming part of real life for more and more people around the world, especially with respect to the arts, culture, and heritage.

16 citations


"States of Being: Art and identity i..." refers background in this paper

  • ...She has previously presented at the EVA London 2017 Conference (Giannini 2013; Bowen & Giannini 2014; Giannini & Bowen 2015; 2016; 2017) and co-chaired the previous EVA London Symposia (Bowen & Giannini 2016; Bowen, Giannini & Polmeer 2017)....

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Proceedings ArticleDOI
07 Jul 2015
TL;DR: Although the story of Galois and his close relations can be seen as one of tragedy with lives cut short, from a historical viewpoint Evariste Galois' contribution to humankind has been a triumph.
Abstract: Evariste Galois (1811--1832) has been increasingly recognised as an important mathematician who despite his short life developed mathematical ideas that today have applications in computer science (such as Galois connections) and elsewhere. Some of Galois' mathematics can be visualised in interesting and even artistic ways, aided using software. In addition, a significant corpus of the historical documentation on Galois and his family (including his brother Alfred Galois, who was an artist), can now be accessed online as a growing number of institutional archives digitise their collections. This paper introduces some of the mathematics of Galois, ways in which it can be visualised, and also considers the issues and new opportunities with respect to visualising information on Galois and his family (including the connections between them). Although the story of Galois and his close relations can be seen as one of tragedy with lives cut short, from a historical viewpoint Evariste Galois' contribution to humankind has been a triumph.

14 citations


"States of Being: Art and identity i..." refers background in this paper

  • ...She has previously presented at the EVA London 2017 Conference (Giannini 2013; Bowen & Giannini 2014; Giannini & Bowen 2015; 2016; 2017) and co-chaired the previous EVA London Symposia (Bowen & Giannini 2016; Bowen, Giannini & Polmeer 2017)....

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