scispace - formally typeset
Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.3390/JCM10051070

Stereolithography vs. Direct Light Processing for Rapid Manufacturing of Complete Denture Bases: An In Vitro Accuracy Analysis.

04 Mar 2021-Journal of Clinical Medicine (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute)-Vol. 10, Iss: 5, pp 1070
Abstract: The topical literature lacks any comparison between stereolithography (SLA) and direct light processing (DLP) printing methods with regard to the accuracy of complete denture base fabrication, thereby utilizing materials certified for this purpose. In order to investigate this aspect, 15 denture bases were printed with SLA and DLP methods using three build angles: 0°, 45° and 90°. The dentures were digitalized using a laboratory scanner (D2000, 3Shape) and analyzed in analyzing software (Geomagic Control X, 3D systems). Differences between 3D datasets were measured using the root mean square (RMS) value for trueness and precision and mean and maximum deviations were obtained for each denture base. The data were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparison test. A heat map was generated to display the locations of the deviations within the intaglio surface. The overall tendency indicated that SLA denture bases had significantly higher trueness for most build angles compared to DLP (p < 0.001). The 90° build angle may provide the best trueness for both SLA and DLP. With regard to precision, statistically significant differences were found in the build angles only. Higher precision was revealed in the DLP angle of 0° in comparison to the 45° and 90° angles.

... read more

Citations
  More

9 results found


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.3390/JCM10092010
Abstract: Popular media now often present 3D printing as a widely employed technology for the production of dental prostheses. This article aims to show, based on factual information, to what extent 3D printing can be used in dental laboratories and dental practices at present. It attempts to present a rational evaluation of todays´ applications of 3D printing technology in the context of dental restorations. In addition, the article discusses future perspectives and examines the ongoing viability of traditional dental laboratory services and manufacturing processes. It also shows which expertise is needed for the digital additive manufacturing of dental restorations.

... read more

8 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.JDS.2021.04.004
Abstract: The emergence of 3D (3-Dimensional) printing technology into the field of dentistry has afforded the practitioner capabilities that have recently been restricted to dental laboratories. Over the last 10 years, 3D printing technology has become more attainable for clinicians and has allowed them to deliver more accurate, cost effective, and time efficient treatments to patients. This revolutionary modality allows for the fabrication of working models, prosthodontic restorations, orthodontic appliances, surgical guides for implant placement, and maxillofacial prostheses. The foundation to 3D printing technology is the data acquired from intraoral optical scanners (IOS) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. This data is then converted into standard tessellation language (STL) where it can be uploaded to 3D modeling software to be manipulated to meet the clinicians manufacturing needs. Following these modifications, clinicians upload the files

... read more

2 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.3390/MA14154103
23 Jul 2021-Materials
Abstract: Different approaches for digital workflows have already been presented for their use in palatal plates for newborns and infants. However, there is no evidence on the accuracy of CAD/CAM manufactured orthodontic appliances for this kind of application. This study evaluates trueness and precision provided by different CAM technologies and materials for these appliances. Samples of a standard palatal stimulation plate were manufactured using stereolithography (SLA), direct light processing (DLP) and subtractive manufacturing (SM). The effect of material (for SM) and layer thickness (for DLP) were also investigated. Specimens were digitized with a laboratory scanner (D2000, 3Shape) and analyzed with a 3D inspection software (Geomagic Control X, 3D systems). For quantitative analysis, differences between 3D datasets were measured using root mean square (RMS) error values for trueness and precision. For qualitative analysis, color maps were generated to detect locations of deviations within each sample. SM showed higher trueness and precision than AM technologies. Reducing layer thickness in DLP did not significantly increase accuracy, but prolonged manufacturing time. All materials and technologies met the clinically acceptable range and are appropriate for their use. DLP with 100 µm layer thickness showed the highest efficiency, obtaining high trueness and precision within the lowest manufacturing time.

... read more

2 Citations



Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.3390/DJ9090104
06 Sep 2021-Dentistry journal
Abstract: Additive manufacturing (AM) has many advantages and became a valid manufacturing technique for polymers and metals in dentistry. However, its application for dental ceramics is still in process. Among dental ceramics, zirconia is becoming popular and widely used in dentistry mainly due to its outstanding properties. Although subtractive technology or milling is the state of art for manufacturing zirconia restorations but still has shortcomings. Utilizing AM in fabricating ceramics restorations is a new topic for many researchers and companies across the globe and a good understanding of AM of zirconia is essential for dental professional. Therefore, the aim of this narrative review is to illustrate different AM technologies available for processing zirconia and discus their advantages and future potential. A comprehensive literature review was completed to summarize different AM technologies that are available to fabricate zirconia and their clinical application is reported. The results show a promising outcome for utilizing AM of zirconia in restorative, implant and regenerative dentistry. However further improvements and validation is necessary to approve its clinical application.

... read more

1 Citations


References
  More

32 results found


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.BUSHOR.2011.11.003
Barry Berman1Institutions (1)
01 Mar 2012-Business Horizons
Abstract: This article examines the characteristics and applications of 3-D printing and compares it with mass customization and other manufacturing processes. 3-D printing enables small quantities of customized goods to be produced at relatively low costs. While currently used primarily to manufacture prototypes and mockups, a number of promising applications exist in the production of replacement parts, dental crowns, and artificial limbs, as well as in bridge manufacturing. 3-D printing has been compared to such disruptive technologies as digital books and music downloads that enable consumers to order their selections online, allow firms to profitably serve small market segments, and enable companies to operate with little or no unsold finished goods inventory. Some experts have also argued that 3-D printing will significantly reduce the advantages of producing small lot sizes in low-wage countries via reduced need for factory workers.

... read more

1,525 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.DENTAL.2015.09.018
01 Jan 2016-Dental Materials
Abstract: Objectives Additive manufacturing, which is more colloquially referred to as 3D printing, is quickly approaching mainstream adoption as a highly flexible processing technique that can be applied to plastic, metal, ceramic, concrete and other building materials. However, taking advantage of the tremendous versatility associated with in situ photopolymerization as well as the ability to select from a variety of preformed processible polymers, 3D printing predominantly targets the production of polymeric parts and models. The goal of this review is to connect the various additive manufacturing techniques with the monomeric and polymeric materials they use while highlighting emerging material-based developments. Methods Modern additive manufacturing technology was introduced approximately three decades ago but this review compiles recent peer-reviewed literature reports to demonstrate the evolution underway with respect to the various building techniques that differ significantly in approach as well as the new variations in polymer-based materials being employed. Results Recent growth of 3D printing has been dramatic and the ability of the various platform technologies to expand from rapid production prototypic models to the greater volume of readily customizable production of working parts is critical for continued high growth rates. This transition to working part production is highly dependent on adapting materials that deliver not only the requisite design accuracy but also the physical and mechanical properties necessary for the application. Significance With the weighty distinction of being called the next industrial revolution, 3D printing technologies is already altering many industrial and academic operations including changing models for future healthcare delivery in medicine and dentistry.

... read more

Topics: Rapid prototyping (52%)

790 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1108/13552540010309859
Abstract: Layered manufacturing (LM) is emerging as a new manufacturing technology that can enhance the scope of manufacturing. One of the essential tasks in LM is process planning. This paper defines, conceptualizes and reviews the literature in this emerging area. The paper concludes with future projections on the possible directions of research in this area.

... read more

338 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/S0010-4485(03)00110-6
S. H. Choi1, A.M.M. Chan1Institutions (1)
Abstract: This paper describes a virtual prototyping (VP) system that integrates virtual reality with rapid prototyping (RP) to create virtual or digital prototypes to facilitate product development. The proposed VP system incorporates two new simulation methodologies, namely the dexel-based and the layer-based fabrication approaches, to simulate the powder-based and the laminated sheet-based RP processes, respectively. The dexel-based approach deposits arrays of solid strips to form a layer, while the layer-based approach directly forms a complete layer by extruding the slice contours. The layer is subsequently stacked up to fabricate a virtual prototype. The simulation approaches resemble the physical fabrication processes of most RP systems, and are therefore capable of accurately representing the geometrical characteristics of prototypes. In addition to numerical quantification of the simulation results, the system also provides stereoscopic visualisation of the product design and its prototype for detailed analyses. Indeed, the original product design may be superimposed on its virtual prototype, so that areas with dimensional errors beyond design limits may be clearly highlighted to facilitate point-to-point analysis of the surface texture and the dimensional accuracy of the prototype. Hence, the key control parameters of an RP process, such as part orientation, layer thickness and hatch space, may be effectively tuned up for optimal fabrication of physical prototypes in subsequent product development. Furthermore, the virtual prototypes can be transmitted via the Internet to customers to facilitate global manufacturing. As a result, both the lead-time and the product development costs can be significantly reduced.

... read more

Topics: Virtual prototyping (64%), Rapid prototyping (55%), Product design (54%) ... read more

177 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.4012/DMJ.2011-113
Abstract: A new trial method for complete dentures using rapid prototyping (RP) was compared with the conventional method. Wax dentures were fabricated for 10 edentulous patients. Cone-beam CT was used to scan the wax dentures. Using 3D computer-aided design software, seven 3D denture images with different artificial teeth arrangements were made and seven trial dentures per patient were fabricated accordingly. Two prosthodontists performed a denture try-in for one patient using both conventional and RP methods. The prosthodontists and patients rated satisfaction for both methods using a visual analogue scale. Satisfaction ratings with both conventional and RP methods were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Regarding prosthodontist's ratings, esthetics and stability were rated significantly higher with the conventional method than with the RP method, whereas chair time was rated significantly longer with the RP method than with the conventional method. Although further improvements are needed, the trial method applying RP seems promising.

... read more

Topics: Dentures (57%), Denture Retention (50%)

110 Citations