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Studies in the Psychology of Sex

David Slight
- 01 Oct 1928 - 
- Vol. 19, Iss: 4, pp 518-518
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TLDR
Havelock Ellis as discussed by the authors investigated the relationship between love and pain and concluded that pain is a powerful sexual stimulant under certain abnormal circumstances; that it does so because pain is the most powerful means of arousing emotion; and that anger and fear are the two emotions most intimately associated with fear, through which the process of natural selection largely works.
Abstract
an impulse of evacuation and also of its being merely a reproductive impulse. Then Moll's dual definition of the impulses of detumescence and of contvacation are considered, especially in relation to Darwin's sexual selection. Finally the author favours a definition of the sexual impulse as consisting of the impulses of tumescence and detumescence, the latter being a powerful instinct but dependent on the former, and it in turn being closely associated with violent motion such as fighting, or vigorous mocion such as dancing or athletics. The argument is fortified by a wealth of examples taken from animal life and from the primitive races, the collection of which evinces a wide reading and a philosophic grasp of the subject. The second essay treats of the relation of love to pain. Mr. Havelock Ellis sets himself the task to answer the questions?why is it that love inflicts, and even seeks to inflict, pain ? Why is it that love suffers pain, and even seeks to suffer it? This leads directly to the consideration of the essential phenomena of courtship in the animal world generally ; next, passing from the normal to the abnormal, he discusses varieties of algolagnia such as sadism, masochism and flagellation. His conclusions are that pain, especially the mental representation of pain, may act as a powerful sexual stimulant under certain abnormal circumstances; that it does so because pain is the most powerful means of arousing emotion ; that anger and fear are the two emotions most intimately associated with fear, and that they are the fundamental animal emotions on the psychic side, through which the process of natural selection largely works. In the third essay the sexual impulse in women is discussed. The relationship of marriage, celibacy and divorce to suicide in the two sexes shows that in men the frequency of suicide increases progressively throughout life ; in women there is a marked diminution after thirty, i.e., when the period of the most intense sexual emotion has been passed, followed by another increase in frequency during the climacteric period from forty to fifty years. Marriage appears, contrary to the common belief, to be less of a protection against suicide amongst women than men, and divorced women are less liable than

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Hypersexual Disorder: A Proposed Diagnosis for DSM-V

TL;DR: Specific polythetic diagnostic criteria, as well as behavioral specifiers, are proposed, intended to integrate empirically based contributions from various putative pathophysiological perspectives, including dysregulation of sexual arousal and desire, sexual impulsivity, sexual addiction, and sexual compulsivity.
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Some evidence for heightened sexual attraction under conditions of high anxiety.

TL;DR: Male passersby were contacted by an attractive female interviewer who asked them to fill out questionnaires containing Thematic Apperception Test pictures, and sexual content of stories written by subjects on the fear-arousing bridge and tendency of these subjects to attempt postexperimental contact with the interviewer were both significantly greater.
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Black Bodies, White Bodies: Toward an Iconography of Female Sexuality in Late Nineteenth-Century Art, Medicine, and Literature

Sander L. Gilman
- 01 Jan 1985 - 
TL;DR: It is apparent that, when individuals are shown within a work of art, the ideologically charged iconographic nature of the representation dominates, and it dominates in a very specific manner.
Journal ArticleDOI

An Initial Evaluation of the Functions of Human Olfaction

TL;DR: This article presents an initial effort at identifying and categorizing these functions, using 3 sources of information as a guide: 1) losses experienced by anosmic participants; 2) olfactory function in other mammals; and 3) capacity, namely, whether the human Olfactory system can support the suggested function and whether there is evidence that it does.
References
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI

Hypersexual Disorder: A Proposed Diagnosis for DSM-V

TL;DR: Specific polythetic diagnostic criteria, as well as behavioral specifiers, are proposed, intended to integrate empirically based contributions from various putative pathophysiological perspectives, including dysregulation of sexual arousal and desire, sexual impulsivity, sexual addiction, and sexual compulsivity.
Journal ArticleDOI

Some evidence for heightened sexual attraction under conditions of high anxiety.

TL;DR: Male passersby were contacted by an attractive female interviewer who asked them to fill out questionnaires containing Thematic Apperception Test pictures, and sexual content of stories written by subjects on the fear-arousing bridge and tendency of these subjects to attempt postexperimental contact with the interviewer were both significantly greater.
Journal ArticleDOI

Black Bodies, White Bodies: Toward an Iconography of Female Sexuality in Late Nineteenth-Century Art, Medicine, and Literature

Sander L. Gilman
- 01 Jan 1985 - 
TL;DR: It is apparent that, when individuals are shown within a work of art, the ideologically charged iconographic nature of the representation dominates, and it dominates in a very specific manner.
Journal ArticleDOI

An Initial Evaluation of the Functions of Human Olfaction

TL;DR: This article presents an initial effort at identifying and categorizing these functions, using 3 sources of information as a guide: 1) losses experienced by anosmic participants; 2) olfactory function in other mammals; and 3) capacity, namely, whether the human Olfactory system can support the suggested function and whether there is evidence that it does.