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Journal ArticleDOI

Sunnifying ʿAlī: Historiography and Notions of Rebellion in Ibn Kathīr’s Kitāb al-Bidāya wa-l-nihāya

Aaron M. Hagler1
04 May 2020-Der Islam (De Gruyter)-Vol. 97, Iss: 1, pp 203-232
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore the literary-narrative strategies Ibn Kathīr employs to alter the narrative so as to counteract the implications of the pro-ʿAlīd versions of the story he found in his sources, especially al-Ṭabarī's Taʾrīkh al-Rusul wa-l-mulūk.
Abstract: Abstract In the era of the “Sunnī Revival” and the couple of centuries following, scholars engaged in a large historiographical project aimed at rehabilitating the reputation of the Umayyad dynasty and Syria’s role in the early Islamic narrative. One of Ibn Kathīr’s historiographical missions in his history Kitāb al-Bidāya wa-l-nihāya was specifically the defense of the Companions of the Prophet. As such, the narrative of ʿAlī ibn Abī Ṭālib required some manipulation to answer Shīʿī narratives that cast some of the most important Companions (especially those associated with the Umayyads and Syria) in a rebellious light. This article explores the literary-narrative strategies Ibn Kathīr employs to alter the narrative so as to counteract the implications of the pro-ʿAlīd versions of the story he found in his sources, especially al-Ṭabarī’s Taʾrīkh al-Rusul wa-l-mulūk.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The introduction to Islamic Theology and Law is given in this article, with a discussion of the relationship between Islamology and law, and its application in the field of Islamology.
Abstract: The description for this book, Introduction to Islamic Theology and Law, will be forthcoming.

108 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: El-Hibri et al. as mentioned in this paper discuss parable and politics in early Islamic history: the Rashidun caliphs, by Tayeb El-hibri, New York, Columbia University Press, 2010, xvi + 1.471 pp., $60.00 (hardback), ISBN 978-0-231-15082-8
Abstract: Parable and politics in early Islamic history: the Rashidun caliphs, by Tayeb El-Hibri, New York, Columbia University Press, 2010, xvi + 471 pp., $60.00 (hardback), ISBN 978-0-231-15082-8 In a hand...

19 citations

Book
01 Jan 1996
TL;DR: In this paper, a 10-century jurist has written a key text in Islamic law, which is still widely referred to by scholars, but only now translated into English, called the Qur'an.
Abstract: Written by a 10-century jurist, this is a key text in Islamic law, still widely referred to by scholars, but only now translated into English.

11 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: Ibn-Taymiyya and his Times as mentioned in this paper is a compilation of twelve articles about Ibn-Taye and his times, most of which were originally prepared for a conference entitled “Ibn Taymiyyya and His Times” at Princeton University in April of 2005.
Abstract: Ibn Taymiyya has become an unavoidable name in the study of modern Islamic thought. This 13 th century thinker spent most of his life in Damascus, where he gained a reputation for being a radical thinker. This volume of articles, Ibn Taymiyya and His Times, is from the Oxford University Press series, Studies in Islamic Philosophy. It is a compilation of twelve articles about Ibn Taymiyya, most of which were originally prepared for a conference entitled “Ibn Taymiyya and His Times” at Princeton University in April of 2005. Ibn Taymiyya and his Times presents a different view of Ibn Taymiyya than prevails in the popular imagination. He has a rational and pragmatic side, making him far from a champion of traditionalism. The articles should help open multiple discussions on Ibn Taymiyya, including his use of rationality and his legacy.

6 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the history of collective memory is recast as a complex process of cultural production and consumption that acknowledges the persistence of cultural traditions as well as the ingenuity of memory makers and the subversive interests of memory consumers.
Abstract: The memory wave in the humanities has contributed to the impressive revival of cultural history, but the success of memory studies has not been accompanied by significant conceptual and methodological advances in the research of collective memory processes. Most studies on memory focus on the representation of specific events within particular chronological, geographical, and media settings without reflecting on the audiences of the representations in question. As a result, the wealth of new insights into past and present historical cultures cannot be linked conclusively to specific social collectives and their historical consciousness. This methodological problem is even enhanced by the metaphorical use of psychological and neurological terminology, which misrepresents the social dynamics of collective memory as an effect and extension of individual, autobiographical memory. Some of these shortcomings can be addressed through the extensive contextualization of specific strategies of representation, which links facts of representation with facts of reception. As a result, the history of collective memory would be recast as a complex process of cultural production and consumption that acknowledges the persistence of cultural traditions as well as the ingenuity of memory makers and the subversive interests of memory consumers. The negotiations among these three different historical agents create the rules of engagement in the competitive arena of memory politics, and the reconstruction of these negotiations helps us distinguish among the abundance of failed collective memory initiatives on the one hand and the few cases of successful collective memory construction on the other. For this purpose, collective memory studies should adopt the methods of communication and media studies, especially with regard to media reception, and continue to use a wide range of interpretive tools from traditional historiography to poststructural approaches. From the perspective of collective memory studies, these two traditions are closely related and mutually beneficial, rather than mutually exclusive, ways of analyzing historical cultures.

889 citations

Book
01 Jan 1998

166 citations

MonographDOI
31 Jan 2021
TL;DR: The authors argues that the Islamic historical tradition arose not out of idle curiosity, or through imitation of antique models, but as a response to a variety of challenges facing the Islamic community during its first several centuries (ca. 7 to 10 centuries CE).
Abstract: How and why did Muslims first come to write their own history? The author argues in this work that the Islamic historical tradition arose not out of idle curiosity", or through imitation of antique models, but as a response to a variety of challenges facing the Islamic community during its first several centuries (ca. seventh to tenth centuries CE). The narratives that resulted focused on certain themes of Islamic origins, selected to legitimise particular aspects of the Islamic community and faith in one or another. These included the need to establish the status of Muhammad (d. 632) as prophet, to affirm that the community to which they belonged was the direct descendant of the original community founded by the Prophet, to explain Muslim hegemony over vast populations of non-Muslims in the rapidly growing Islamic empire, and to articulate different positions in the ongoing debate with the Islamic community itself over political and religious leadership. An examination of these key themes of early Islamic historiography and the issues generating them is placed in the context of other styles of legitimisation in the early Islamic community, including such methods as appeals to piety and genealogy. Narratives of Islamic Origins is a ground-breaking work that represents the first comprehensive tradition -- critical account of the origins and rise of Arab-Islamic historiography, and is essential reading for all historians of medieval Islamic history and civilisation, and for all those interested in the historiography of comparative civilisations.

137 citations

Book
11 Dec 2002
Abstract: Jonathan Berkey's 2003 book surveys the religious history of the peoples of the Near East from roughly 600 to 1800 CE. The opening chapter examines the religious scene in the Near East in late antiquity, and the religious traditions which preceded Islam. Subsequent chapters investigate Islam's first century and the beginnings of its own traditions, the 'classical' period from the accession of the Abbasids to the rise of the Buyid amirs, and thereafter the emergence of new forms of Islam in the middle period. Throughout, close attention is paid to the experiences of Jews and Christians, as well as Muslims. The book stresses that Islam did not appear all at once, but emerged slowly, as part of a prolonged process whereby it was differentiated from other religious traditions and, indeed, that much that we take as characteristic of Islam is in fact the product of the medieval period.

128 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The introduction to Islamic Theology and Law is given in this article, with a discussion of the relationship between Islamology and law, and its application in the field of Islamology.
Abstract: The description for this book, Introduction to Islamic Theology and Law, will be forthcoming.

108 citations