scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Journal ArticleDOI

Supplementary notes on the biology of the large biros of prey of embu district, kenya colony

03 Apr 2008-Ibis (Blackwell Publishing Ltd)-Vol. 97, Iss: 1, pp 38-64
TL;DR: The fluctuations of population in an area of 146 square miles in Embu district, where a census of eagles was carried out in 1950, are described and discussed and the inter-relations of various species are discussed.
Abstract: Summary. 1 The present paper is supplementary to that in ‘Ibis’ 94 and 95. 2 The fluctuations of population in an area of 146 square miles in Embu district, where a census of eagles was carried out in 1950, are described and discussed fur 951–52. 3 The inter-relations of various species are discussed, particularly for Aquila wahlbergi and Lophaetus occipitalis. 4 General accounts of breeding biology are given for Sagittarius serpentarius, Aquila wahlbergi, Hieraaetus ayresi and Terathopius ecaudatus, and supplementary data for Aquila verreauxi, Hieraaetus spilogaster, Polemaetus bellicosus, Stephanoaetus coronatus, Lophaetus occipitalis, Circaetus cinereus and Circaetus pectoralis. These accounts are given under the following heads:— 1 General notes on adults. 2 Nests and nest-building. 3 The incubation period. 4 The fledging period: (a) general, (b) development of the young, (c) parental behaviour, (d) food. 5 The post-fledging period. 5 Special problems of breeding biology are discussed under the following heads: (1) Display; (2) Eagle-weaver-bird nesting-associations; (3) Feeding rates of female and eaglet; (4) Breeding seasons; (5) Breeding success and replacement rate.
Citations
More filters
Journal Article
TL;DR: This Secretarybird had eaten 8 snakes and 13 grasshoppers, presumably all in one day.
Abstract: Therefore, this Secretarybird had eaten 8 snakes and 13 grasshoppers, presumably all in one day.

1 citations


Cites background or result from "Supplementary notes on the biology ..."

  • ...The importance of Orthoptera (grasshoppers and locusts) in the diet of Secretarybirds has long been stressed (Brown 1955; Steyn 1961; Brooke and Hodgson 1971; Kemp and Kemp 1978; Steyn and Myburgh 1992; Kemp 1994, 1995) and this Balfour Secretarybird conforms with that trend....

    [...]

  • ...…concluded that "contrary to popular belief, snakes are but a small part of the diet of Secretarybirds" Myburgh’s position has support from other primary studies, e.g. Brown (1955) recorded mostly small mammals and grasshoppers fed to nestlings in Kenya (but a few snakes brought to the in female)....

    [...]

01 Jan 2009
TL;DR: This is the first survey done regarding to distribution of parental care between sexes in the eastern imperial eagle in Bulgaria, and shows similar results as obtained for the Spanish imperial eagle.
Abstract: A survey was carried out for studying some aspects of nest etology of the eastern imperial eagle (Aquila heliaca Savigni, 1809) in Sakar Mountain. The aim of the survey was to determine apportionment of the parental care between partners in the pair. Incubation in the both studied pairs was taken mainly by the female bird, which incubated 90.8% of the time in one of the pairs corresponding to 94.1% in the other one. Male contributed significantly in food provisioning, supplying 59.2% of the food in one of the pairs and 58.3% in the second one. The survey shows similar results as obtained for the Spanish imperial eagle (A. adalberti ). This is the first survey done regarding to distribution of parental care between sexes in the eastern imperial eagle in Bulgaria.

1 citations

30 Jun 2016
TL;DR: Holland et al. as mentioned in this paper studied the breeding behaviour and development of New Zealand falcons (Falco novaeseelandiae) during a 4-month period up to 2 March 2007.
Abstract: The breeding behaviour and development of New Zealand falcons (Falco novaeseelandiae) were recorded at 2 nests in Kaingaroa Forest during a 4-month period up to 2 March 2007. This covered the later part of incubation, and the entire nestling and early post-fledging periods. Incubation was shared between parents; the male primarily incubated the eggs, during which time the female hunted. The male only provided occasional prey for the female. Brooding by both parents was intensive for the first 6 days and then gradually declined until the chicks reached 14 days old at which point it ceased. Assisted feeding of the chicks was almost always undertaken by the female. The male’s primary role during the nestling period was prey delivery. During the early nestling period the female spent the majority of the time brooding chicks before shifting to hunting for the young. Holland, J.; Thomas, A.; Minot, E. 2016. Nesting behaviour and development of New Zealand falcons (Falco novaeseelandiae) in a plantation forest. Notornis 63 (2): 87-95.

1 citations

References
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
03 Apr 2008-Ibis
TL;DR: The observed timing of breeding seasons can be secured only by external factors regulating an internal rhythm, and in some communities and categories of birds the “reasons” for the observed breeding seasons are intelligible.
Abstract: Summary. 1 For the present purpose Africa is divided into everyreen, semi-arid and intermediate (deciduous) types of count?, all of which occur in all latitudes south of the Sahara. 2 “Breeding season” is limited to the months during which eggs are laid by the species concerned in the given area and all records are interpreted accordingly. As a basis for ascertaining the curve of breeding activity in a given area through the year the number of species laying in each month has been ascertained and calculated as a percentage of the total for all species for the whole year. 3 A definite peak in the curve of breeding activity is evident everywhere except in certain areas within about four degrees of the Equator. 4 In one part of this inner tropical belt there may be no distinct breeding season for must groups of birds (Congo), but in East Africa a double breeding season is the rule, with peaks coinciding with the two rainy seasons. 5 Even so close to the Equator as 5°s. the (single) breeding season in evergreen forest is as restricted as in other types of country and its time-relation to the rains varies locally. 6 In the “ intermediate” type of country characterized by 4–6 months drought each year the timing of the peak breeding season varies from the end of the rains, at Cape Town, to the start of the rains in Natal and several weeks before the rains in areas 23° - 10° S. 7 The key to this local difference is that at Cape Town the rains fall in the cold season, so that vegetation and insects are slow to flush. In the warmer conditions in which the rains begin in Natal the flush comes at once. And further north the dominant vegetation and its associated insects flush towards the end of the drought and well in advance of the rains. 8 From Natal northwards the breeding season for all birds combined shows a progressively less marked peak. The reason is that the seasons of certain ecological categories (1) water birds, (2) raptors and scavengers, (3) ground birds, (4) grass birds, (5) the other birds, tend to diverge. 9 The raptors and scavengers are everywhere the earliest breeders, the biggest species laying by the middle of the dry season. The water birds lay to a large extent towards the end of the rain, and after. The ground birds tend to lay as soon as the grass fires are over and before the heavy rains have induced a lush growth of herbage. The grass birds lay later than most-others, when the grass has grown high. 10 In semi-arid areas the breeding seasons are on the whole similar to the foregoing, with most birds breeding when the vegetation flushes, whether just before or after rain has fallen. But the “semi-and” birds are notably sensitive to rainfall; breeding that has begun is checked if the rains are interrupted. 11 In some communities and categories of birds the “reasons” for the observed breeding seasons are intelligible, the best food-supply or the safest nesting apparently being secured. In others the reasons are not obvious; and the degree to which the breeding seasons are restricted is often incomprehensible. 12 The observed timing of breeding seasons can be secured only by external factors regulating an internal rhythm. Day-length, rainfall and humidity, temperature and visual stimuli are each considered briefly. Each may be effective on some species in some areas, but no one generally.

123 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
03 Apr 2008-Ibis
TL;DR: The species of eagles occurring in Embu district are detailed, with general notes on the methods and scope of the study, and the inter-relations of the various species are discussed from the points of view of territorial agressiveness and competition for prey.
Abstract: SUMMARY. 1 The species of eagles occurring in Embu district are detailed, with general notes on the methods and scope of the study. 2 The vegetation and climate of Embu district are described, and their effect upon eagles is discussed. 3 Population and inter-relations. The actual population of eagles and of the Secretary Bird in an area of approximately 146 sq. miles is given and their remarkable local concentrations are described. The inter-relations of the various species are discussed from the points of view of territorial agressiveness and competition for prey. 4 Detailed accounts are given of the breeding biology of Sagittarius serpentarius, Aquila verreauxi, A. wahlbergi, Hieraaetus spilogaster, Polmaetus bellicosus, Stephano-aetus coronatus and Circaetus cinereus, and some information for Terathopius ecaudatus, Circaetus pectoralis, and Aquila rapax, Hieraaetus ayresi, Lophaetus occipitalis, and Cuncuma vocifer. The headings for each species include: “Nests and nest-building”, “Incubation period”, “Fledging period” (with special attention to food), and “Post-fledging period”. 5 The following special aspects of breeding behaviour are described and discussed: (1) Display, (2) Use of green branches, (3) Breeding seasons, (4) Breeding success, (5) Breeding frequency.

39 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
03 Apr 2008-Ibis

22 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
03 Apr 2008-Ibis
TL;DR: Breeding records in Tropical Africa show, when analysed with reference to egg-dates, that as a rule in each area the young get through their fledging period, or at least the later, unbrooded part, during the local cool dry season.
Abstract: Summary An account is given of one hundred hours of observations at a Bateleur'a nest in north-eastern Tanganyike Territory. The adults were a white-backed bird and a chestnut-backed, with a sub-adult; probably over three years old, in association with them. The youngster took 130 dap to fledge. During at least part of the time all its food was brought by the white-backed adult. When the fledgling was about one month old its feeds averaged about one in eight hours; during its last week in the nest feeds were nearly three times as frequent. Literature and unpublished data are reviewed in relation to special points of interest, viz.:— Slow development and maturation accords with longevity. Fledging period apparently longer than authentically recorded for any land bird. First wing-moult may have started before first flight. Tail length is greater in proportion to wing in juveniles than in adults. Proportion of white-becks to chestnut-backs differs in parts of Africa, being least in South africa. White-tailed birds seem confined to Sudanese semi-desert belt. Voice, flight habits and wing-noises seem to differ in parts of Africa. Food comprises both carrion and live prey, especially snakes, but not poultry or other birds. Claws are not less sharp than those of Stephanoaetus and Polemaetus. Breeding records in Tropical Africa show, when analysed with reference to egg-dates, that as a rule in each area the young get through their fledging period, or at least the later, unbrooded part, during the local cool dry season. Psychologically the Bateleur is most peculiar: in the wild it is shy of man, sociable with big birdv of its own and other species, and breeding birds tolerate sub-adults: in captivity it becomes unusually tame, has a grecting ceremony for friends and likes to be handled.

11 citations