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Journal ArticleDOI

Sustainable Development Goals and Social Work: Opportunities and Challenges for Social Work Practice in Malaysia

03 Mar 2016-Vol. 1, Iss: 1, pp 19-29
TL;DR: The Global Agenda enhances these possibilities for Social Workers as the SDG goals and values have parallels relevance and application with Social Work practice as discussed by the authors, however, there are challenges too, as social work practice addressing both human rights and environmental concerns address structural issues viewed as politically sensitive and therefore might be confrontational in nature.
Abstract: The global agenda of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) provides Social Workers an opportunity to redefine their role pertaining to people empowerment, socio-economic development, human rights and the environment. This is especially so for Social Workers in Malaysia whose roles have been narrowly defined in the past. The Global Agenda enhances these possibilities for Social Workers as the SDG goals and values have parallels relevance and application with Social Work practice. However, there are challenges too, as Social Work practice addressing both human rights and environmental concerns address structural issues viewed as politically sensitive and therefore might be confrontational in nature. Nonetheless, Social Workers must stand alongside their service users as partners in development and address issues of injustice and inequality courageously and uncompromisingly abiding by Social Work Principles and Values.

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Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a comprehensive review of the literature and develop a novel framework in order to tackle the barriers and challenges to operationalize and monitor the implementation of the SDGs.

276 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors investigate whether FDI contributes to the achievement of sustainable development goals (SDGs) in Africa by analyzing a sample of 44 African countries regarding their SDG scores and apply multivariate analysis and an ordered probit model.

95 citations

Reference EntryDOI
29 Mar 2017
TL;DR: The Global Agenda for Social Work and Social Development (The Agenda) as discussed by the authors is developed by three professional organizations: International Association of Schools of Social Work, International Council on Social Welfare, and International Federation of Social Workers.
Abstract: The Global Agenda for Social Work and Social Development ( The Agenda ) is being developed by three global, professional organizations – International Association of Schools of Social Work, International Council on Social Welfare, and International Federation of Social Workers. Launched in 2010 to strengthen the international profile of social work and social development, it enables social workers to make a stronger contribution to policy development. The Agenda identifies four fields for action by global institutions, local communities, and the three organizations: promoting social and economic equalities, promoting dignity and worth of peoples, working toward environmental sustainability, and strengthening human relationships. This article links The Agenda process with parallel developments within the worldwide social work professional community.

88 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a classification of SDGs and their targets based on the five pillars (People, Planet, Prosperity, Peace and Partnership) and assess whether potential synergies and trade-offs are related to the classification of the targets.
Abstract: The 2030 Agenda calls for a change in thinking in order to implement sustainable development goals (SDGs) and targets as a system. To achieve this goal, the 2030 Agenda established five pillars (“5 Ps”): people, planet, prosperity, peace and partnership. Here, we present a classification of these SDGs and their targets based on the five pillars. Our aim is to improve our understanding of interactions by assessing whether potential synergies and trade‐offs are related to the classification of the targets. We surveyed 30 people and asked them to associate the content of target labels with the pillars. We classified SDG and targets according to an original quantification system. We determined whether the interactions were linked to similar or different classifications of the targets. We observed that the more similar the targets were in terms of classification, the more positive the interactions. We also noted that synergies exist between targets of different classifications. Our findings are useful for applying a systemic approach for policy coherence in sustainability analysis.

64 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
30 Oct 2019
TL;DR: In this paper, a multi-step methodology is used to analyze the potential role of construction and real estate in the 2030 Agenda and reveal that 17% of the SDG targets are directly dependent and 27% of them are indirectly dependent on these sectors' activities.
Abstract: Construction and real estate have been central to the debates on sustainable development. However, the dominant definition of sustainability in construction and real estate remain centred on the environmental dimension. The 2030 Agenda and its Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) offer new opportunities for the building sector to expand its focus. The available literature utilizes the existing green ratings, sustainability assessment tools and standards as the basis for investigating how construction and buildings can contribute to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. However, less focus was placed on exploring the broad intersection between the building sector, on the one hand, and the SDGs and their targets on the other. This paper uses a multi-step methodology to analyze the potential role of construction and real estate in the 2030 Agenda. The paper identifies SDG targets that depend (directly or indirectly) on construction and real estate activities, and reveals that 17% of the SDG targets are directly dependent and 27% of the targets are indirectly dependent on these sectors’ activities. The identified targets are analyzed and are found to be related to all 17 goals—with the largest contributions to SDGs 11, 6, and 7. The results of the analysis are mapped and illustrated in order to provide insights to academics, practitioners and governments. This research contributes to the literature on the implementation of the 2030 Agenda. It also exposes the synergistic possibilities, and the partnerships required, to make use of the potential role of construction and real estate in the implementation of the UN Agenda.

48 citations


Cites background from "Sustainable Development Goals and S..."

  • ...Since their adoption, it was anticipated that the SDGs will strongly influence politics, capital flows, and development priorities [76]....

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  • ...The 17 goals and their 169 targets are structured around 5 key themes—people, planet, prosperity, peace and partnerships—known as the five Ps [76]....

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  • ...It was also clear that achieving these goals would require the emergence of original partnership structures to build new collaborations among private, public and research communities [73,76]....

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References
More filters
Book
01 Jan 1999
TL;DR: In this paper, Amartya Sen quotes the eighteenth century poet William Cowper on freedom: Freedom has a thousand charms to show, That slaves howe'er contented, never know.
Abstract: In Development as Freedom Amartya Sen quotes the eighteenth century poet William Cowper on freedom: Freedom has a thousand charms to show, That slaves howe'er contented, never know. Sen explains how in a world of unprecedented increase in overall opulence, millions of people living in rich and poor countries are still unfree. Even if they are not technically slaves, they are denied elementary freedom and remain imprisoned in one way or another by economic poverty, social deprivation, political tyranny or cultural authoritarianism. The main purpose of development is to spread freedom and its 'thousand charms' to the unfree citizens. Freedom, Sen persuasively argues, is at once the ultimate goal of social and economic arrangements and the most efficient means of realizing general welfare. Social institutions like markets, political parties, legislatures, the judiciary, and the media contribute to development by enhancing individual freedom and are in turn sustained by social values. Values, institutions, development, and freedom are all closely interrelated, and Sen links them together in an elegant analytical framework. By asking "What is the relation between our collective economic wealth and our individual ability to live as we would like?" and by incorporating individual freedom as a social commitment into his analysis, Sen allows economics once again, as it did in the time of Adam Smith, to address the social basis of individual well-being and freedom.

19,080 citations

Book
03 Mar 2015
TL;DR: Sachs as discussed by the authors presents a compelling and practical framework for how global citizens can use a holistic way forward to address the seemingly intractable worldwide problems of persistent extreme poverty, environmental degradation, and political-economic injustice: sustainable development.
Abstract: Jeffrey D. Sachs is one of the world's most perceptive and original analysts of global development. In this major new work he presents a compelling and practical framework for how global citizens can use a holistic way forward to address the seemingly intractable worldwide problems of persistent extreme poverty, environmental degradation, and political-economic injustice: sustainable development. Sachs offers readers, students, activists, environmentalists, and policy makers the tools, metrics, and practical pathways they need to achieve Sustainable Development Goals. Far more than a rhetorical exercise, this book is designed to inform, inspire, and spur action. Based on Sachs's twelve years as director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University, his thirteen years advising the United Nations secretary-general on the Millennium Development Goals, and his recent presentation of these ideas in a popular online course, The Age of Sustainable Development is a landmark publication and clarion call for all who care about our planet and global justice.

633 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The report of the High-Level Panel of Eminent Persons on the Post-2015 Development Agenda as discussed by the authors is a good summary of the past few months of work on the post-2015 development agenda.
Abstract: I am delighted to be able to present the Report of the High-Level Panel of Eminent Persons on the Post-2015 Development Agenda to you today. I don’t mind admitting that my delight is tinged with a little relief: the past few months have been tough, and I was not always sure whether we would achieve a consensual result. I now believe and hope, however, that the Panel has produced a powerful document that can be a valuable tool in our quest for solutions to the major global challenges of the twenty-first century.

383 citations

Book
01 Jan 2007

16 citations


"Sustainable Development Goals and S..." refers background or methods in this paper

  • ...Furthermore, a more holistic and sustainable way of addressing human need is promoted through tackling poverty, education, health, economy and employment which are all human development concerns. The International Federation of Social Workers, the International Association of Schools of Social Work and the International Council on Social Welfare jointly initiated a global agenda between 2012 and 2016 (IFSW 2014). In 2010 at Hong Kong, an extensive consultative process began at a joint conference and this culminated in specific commitments to action. A joint publication entitled ‘The Global Agenda for social work and social development commitment to action’ was developed. In this exercise, the three global organisations agreed to support the UN in the preparation of the post 2015 development agenda. At the global campaign level, the three global organisations agreed to undertake five strategies, namely promote social and economic equalities, ensure the dignity and worth of the persons, promote sustainable communities and environmentally sensitive development, promote well-being through sustainable human relationships, and ensure an appropriate environment for practice and education. The organisations jointly stated ‘we would strive with others for a peoplefocused global economy that is regulated to protect and 20 J. Hum. Rights Soc. Work (2016) 1:19–29...

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  • ...community organising and undertake a stringer practice approach as advocated by Ling (2007) and Ling et al....

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  • ...…especially the urban poor requires our urgent attention, and social workers can facilitate community organising and undertake a stringer practice approach as advocated by Ling (2007) and Ling et al. (2014) utilising a cross-cultural social work method which is sensitive to cultural diversity....

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  • ...community organising and undertake a stringer practice approach as advocated by Ling (2007) and Ling et al. (2014) utilising a cross-cultural social work method which is sensi-...

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Book
01 Dec 2000

9 citations


"Sustainable Development Goals and S..." refers background in this paper

  • ...According to Jayasooria (2000), ‘prior to this there was no organised welfare by the colonial administration....

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