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Switching and Finite Automata Theory

TL;DR: Theories are made easier to understand with 200 illustrative examples, and students can test their understanding with over 350 end-of-chapter review questions.
Abstract: Understand the structure, behavior, and limitations of logic machines with this thoroughly updated third edition. Many new topics are included, such as CMOS gates, logic synthesis, logic design for emerging nanotechnologies, digital system testing, and asynchronous circuit design, to bring students up-to-speed with modern developments. The intuitive examples and minimal formalism of the previous edition are retained, giving students a text that is logical and easy to follow, yet rigorous. Kohavi and Jha begin with the basics, and then cover combinational logic design and testing, before moving on to more advanced topics in finite-state machine design and testing. Theory is made easier to understand with 200 illustrative examples, and students can test their understanding with over 350 end-of-chapter review questions.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Much of what constitutes the core of scientific knowledge may be regarded as a reservoir of concepts and techniques which can be drawn upon to construct mathematical models of various types of systems and thereby yield quantitative information concerning their behavior.

12,530 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A simple, efficient algorithm to locate all occurrences of any of a finite number of keywords in a string of text that has been used to improve the speed of a library bibliographic search program by a factor of 5 to 10.
Abstract: This paper describes a simple, efficient algorithm to locate all occurrences of any of a finite number of keywords in a string of text. The algorithm consists of constructing a finite state pattern matching machine from the keywords and then using the pattern matching machine to process the text string in a single pass. Construction of the pattern matching machine takes time proportional to the sum of the lengths of the keywords. The number of state transitions made by the pattern matching machine in processing the text string is independent of the number of keywords. The algorithm has been used to improve the speed of a library bibliographic search program by a factor of 5 to 10.

3,270 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An application is the construction of a uniformly universal sequence of codes for countable memoryless sources, in which the n th code has a ratio of average codeword length to source rate bounded by a function of n for all sources with positive rate.
Abstract: Countable prefix codeword sets are constructed with the universal property that assigning messages in order of decreasing probability to codewords in order of increasing length gives an average code-word length, for any message set with positive entropy, less than a constant times the optimal average codeword length for that source. Some of the sets also have the asymptotically optimal property that the ratio of average codeword length to entropy approaches one uniformly as entropy increases. An application is the construction of a uniformly universal sequence of codes for countable memoryless sources, in which the n th code has a ratio of average codeword length to source rate bounded by a function of n for all sources with positive rate; the bound is less than two for n = 0 and approaches one as n increases.

1,306 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
David Lee1, Mihalis Yannakakis1
01 Aug 1996
TL;DR: The fundamental problems in testing finite state machines and techniques for solving these problems are reviewed, tracing progress in the area from its inception to the present and the stare of the art is traced.
Abstract: With advanced computer technology, systems are getting larger to fulfill more complicated tasks: however, they are also becoming less reliable. Consequently, testing is an indispensable part of system design and implementation; yet it has proved to be a formidable task for complex systems. This motivates the study of testing finite stare machines to ensure the correct functioning of systems and to discover aspects of their behavior. A finite state machine contains a finite number of states and produces outputs on state transitions after receiving inputs. Finite state machines are widely used to model systems in diverse areas, including sequential circuits, certain types of programs, and, more recently, communication protocols. In a testing problem we have a machine about which we lack some information; we would like to deduce this information by providing a sequence of inputs to the machine and observing the outputs produced. Because of its practical importance and theoretical interest, the problem of testing finite state machines has been studied in different areas and at various times. The earliest published literature on this topic dates back to the 1950's. Activities in the 1960's mid early 1970's were motivated mainly by automata theory and sequential circuit testing. The area seemed to have mostly died down until a few years ago when the testing problem was resurrected and is now being studied anew due to its applications to conformance testing of communication protocols. While some old problems which had been open for decades were resolved recently, new concepts and more intriguing problems from new applications emerge. We review the fundamental problems in testing finite state machines and techniques for solving these problems, tracing progress in the area from its inception to the present and the stare of the art. In addition, we discuss extensions of finite state machines and some other topics related to testing.

1,273 citations

Book
01 Jul 1990
TL;DR: In this article, a wheel decorating ornament comprising an annular, planar sheet of material decorated on opposite sides, axially disposed between the groups of spokes and radially disposed at the rim and the hub, is presented.
Abstract: In combination with a wheel for a bicycle and the like having an annular rim, a hub rotatable about its axis, and axially offset groups of circumferentially spaced spokes which centrally support the hub on the rim; a wheel decorating ornament comprising an annular, planar sheet of material decorated on opposite sides, axially disposed between the groups of spokes and radially disposed between the rim and the hub.

1,093 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The author was led to the study given in this paper from a consideration of large scale computing machines in which a large number of operations must be performed without a single error in the end result.
Abstract: The author was led to the study given in this paper from a consideration of large scale computing machines in which a large number of operations must be performed without a single error in the end result. This problem of “doing things right” on a large scale is not essentially new; in a telephone central office, for example, a very large number of operations are performed while the errors leading to wrong numbers are kept well under control, though they have not been completely eliminated. This has been achieved, in part, through the use of self-checking circuits. The occasional failure that escapes routine checking is still detected by the customer and will, if it persists, result in customer complaint, while if it is transient it will produce only occasional wrong numbers. At the same time the rest of the central office functions satisfactorily. In a digital computer, on the other hand, a single failure usually means the complete failure, in the sense that if it is detected no more computing can be done until the failure is located and corrected, while if it escapes detection then it invalidates all subsequent operations of the machine. Put in other words, in a telephone central office there are a number of parallel paths which are more or less independent of each other; in a digital machine there is usually a single long path which passes through the same piece of equipment many, many times before the answer is obtained.

5,408 citations

01 Jan 1909

1,575 citations

Book
01 Jan 1993
TL;DR: The principles of the algorithms available for performing arithmetic operations in digital computers, described independently of specific implementation technology and within the same framework, are explained.
Abstract: This text explains the fundamental principles of algorithms available for performing arithmetic operations on digital computers. These include basic arithmetic operations like addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division in fixed-point and floating-point number systems as well as more complex operations such as square root extraction and evaluation of exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. The algorithms described are independent of the particular technology employed for their implementation.

1,174 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A systematic procedure is presented for writing a Boolean function as a minimum sum of products and specific attention is given to terms which can be included in the function solely for the designer's convenience.
Abstract: A systematic procedure is presented for writing a Boolean function as a minimum sum of products This procedure is a simplification and extension of the method presented by W V Quine Specific attention is given to terms which can be included in the function solely for the designer's convenience

1,103 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Problem of Simplifying Truth Functions is concerned with the problem of reducing the number of operations on a graph to a simple number.
Abstract: (1952). The Problem of Simplifying Truth Functions. The American Mathematical Monthly: Vol. 59, No. 8, pp. 521-531.

885 citations