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Journal ArticleDOI

`Taking our personal lives seriously': intimacy, continuity and memory in the television drama serial:

Glen Creeber1
01 Jul 2001-Media, Culture & Society (SAGE PUBLICATIONS)-Vol. 23, Iss: 4, pp 439-455
TL;DR: The authors argues that the rise of the television serial actually indicates the coming of age of TV drama, arguing that the serial is a particularly suitable form for the portrayal of large historical narratives, especially those that, by necessity, cover a large area both in terms of space and time.
Abstract: This article argues against the generally agreed assumption that the demise of the single play heralded the decline in the standards of television drama generally. In contrast, it suggests that the rise of the television serial actually indicates the coming of age of TV drama. Unlike the `teleplay' that originally arose out of a strong theatrical tradition, the serial or `mini-series' better utilizes the generic aesthetics of television and the fundamental dynamics of its audience's viewing habits. In particular, it will demonstrate how the episodic nature of the drama serial successfully mimics and harnesses the many complex, multi-layered levels of both the series and soap opera, while retaining and redefining the finite narrative arch of the single play. This makes the serial a particularly suitable form for the portrayal of large historical narratives, especially those that, by necessity, cover a large area both in terms of space and time. Paying close attention to serials such as Roots (1977), Holoca...
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
Sangkyun Kim1
TL;DR: In this article, the authors investigated the extent to which audience involvement or engagement with a serialised TV drama affects their actual on-site film tourism experiences at its former filmed locations and found that audience's emotional and behavioural involvement was the main driver that positively affected their movie tourism experiences, and that the more emotional involvement audience develops through viewing the TV drama, the greater the likelihood of them visiting film tourism locations.

239 citations


Cites background from "`Taking our personal lives seriousl..."

  • ...…developing parasocial interaction, identification, empathy, and/or reflection from audiences’ reception side are indeed at the centre of audience viewing experiences in particular, a genre of serialised TV dramas including soap operas (Creeber, 2001; Giles, 2002; Hobson, 2003; Kincaid, 2002)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
Sangkyun Kim1
TL;DR: This article examined the context and meanings of photographs taken by tourists who are re-enacting scenes from the series during their visit to Nami Island, the main filming location of Winter Sonata, in South Korea.
Abstract: This paper explores the ways in which screen tourism locations and their associated tourist experiences are (re)produced, contextualised and performed through production and consumption of a Korean television drama series entitled, Winter Sonata. As an exploratory case study based on visual image analysis, this paper examines the context and meanings of photographs taken by tourists who are re-enacting scenes from the series during their visit to Nami Island, the main filming location of Winter Sonata, in South Korea. The photographs are compared with the still images of original scenes in the series. The findings of this comparison suggest that previous viewing experiences of the television series not only created personalised memories and attachment with its filming location, but also produced new touristic spaces. The previous viewing experiences also induced the audiences to visit the filming locations and to perform reflexive and extraordinary touristic experiences in the form of re-enacting scenes f...

109 citations


Cites background from "`Taking our personal lives seriousl..."

  • ...It may allow audiences to feel that they are participating in a real story which is happening just next to them, empathising with the characters and caring about what happens to them (Carroll, 1996; Creeber, 2001; Kincaid, 2002; Hobson, 2003)....

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  • ...Television dramas, including soap operas in which personal and domestic narratives are frequently the central part of storylines, dramatise personal life over and above questions of power, politics, economics, social structure, religion, science or ethics (Carroll, 1996; Creeber, 2001)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a case study of Korean popular television dramas is presented to provide insights on the relationships between this phenomenon and patterns of tourism in Korea related to the wider concept of screen-tourism.
Abstract: This paper examines a popular cultural phenomenon originating in Korea which has assumed significance across Asia and beyond. This ‘Korean wave’ or Hallyu includes the circulation and consumption of Korean popular television dramas. An exploratory case study approach is presented to provide insights on the relationships between this phenomenon and patterns of tourism in Korea related to the wider concept of screen-tourism. The paper addresses the relative lack of attention to television programming within the film tourism literature, particularly in non-Western and non-English language settings. Some common assumptions in the film tourism literature are challenged here, including: the inter-changeability of large-screen films and programmes produced for the television; and the inter-cultural circulation of film and television programmes as catalysts for tourism. Our findings illustrate that the inter-cultural circulation of Hallyu television dramas, particularly in neighbouring countries in Asia,...

93 citations


Cites background from "`Taking our personal lives seriousl..."

  • ...…in media and communication studies also exists, which offers insights on production values and audience responses to and engagement with popular dramatic film and television outputs, in particular stories and characters (Sood and Roger 2000; Creeber 2001; Kincaid 2002; Sood 2002; Bae and Lee 2004)....

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  • ...…can have significant audience impact but, in the case of the former, this tends to be intense, sporadic and relatively short lived (Carroll 1996; Creeber 2001; Beeton 2005), while, in the latter, audiences are developed over a longer period of time, the programmes generating a certain loyalty…...

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Book
01 Jan 2004
TL;DR: Part 1: The Writing Process 1. Background to writing 2. Developing plans from titles 3. Evaluating a text 4. Understanding purpose and register 5. Selecting key points 6. Proof-reading
Abstract: Part 1: The Writing Process 1. Background to writing 2. Developing plans from titles 3. Evaluating a text 4. Understanding purpose and register 5. Selecting key points 6. Note-making 7. Paraphrasing 8. Summary writing 9. Combining sources 10. Planning a text 11. Organising paragraphs 12. Organising the main body 13. Introductions 14. Conclusions 15. Re-reading and re-writing 16. Proof-reading Part 2: Elements of Writing 1. Cause and effect 2. Cohesion 3. Comparisons 4. Definitions 5. Discussion 6. Examples 7. Generalisations 8. Numbers 9. References and quotations 10. Style 11. Synonyms 12. Visual Information Part 3: Accuracy in Writing 1. Abbreviations 2. Adverbs 3. Articles 4. Caution 5. Conjunctions 6. Formality in verbs 7. Modal verbs 8. Nationality language 9. Nouns and adjectives 10. Nouns: countable and uncountable 11. Passives 12. Prefixes and suffixes 13. Prepositions 14. Prepositions after verbs 15. Punctuation 16. Referring verbs 17. Relative pronouns 18. Singular/plural 19. Tenses 20. Time words and phrases Part 4: Writing Models 1. Formal letters 2. CVs 3. Designing and reporting surveys 4. Comparison essay 5. Discursive essay

74 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the role of nostalgia in the involvement, involvement, and memory of the audience in a film was identified. But, the study was limited to a single genre.
Abstract: A film contains an amalgamation of diverse features and provides audiences with a variety of reminiscent elements. Thus, this study aimed to identify the role of nostalgia in the involvement, famil...

65 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
21 Dec 1979-Telos
TL;DR: As the war ends, the massive revelation of the genocide committed against the Jewish people and of the way it was carried out stupefies the Western world as mentioned in this paper, and European nations understand and recognize the immensity and unique nature of the crime with blinding immediacy.
Abstract: As the war ends, the massive revelation of the genocide committed against the Jewish people — and of the way it was carried out — stupefies the Western world. Infected to the core by the poison of anti-Semitism — and knowing that, to varying degrees, they are almost all guilty — the European nations understand and recognize the immensity and unique nature of the crime with blinding immediacy. So all is now clear, neither discussion nor contestation nor denial is possible; the Nazi crime has no precedent and, at the same time, it is unsurpassable precisely because it is an absolute crime.

19 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The film "Holocaust" was shown on West German television during the last week of January, 1979 as mentioned in this paper and an estimated 20 million viewers watched each of the four segments of the program.
Abstract: I was in Frankfurt last year to do research on aspects of Critical Theory. But, as with other American Jews working in West Germany for similar reasons, the subject of Germans and Jews was never far from my consciousness. The topic was not a new one for me. My father had fled from Hitler's Germany in 1937. I had opposed the war in Vietnam with arguments drawn from Hannah Arendt's reflections on the banality of evil. I viewed my own "New Leftism" as a logical outcome of a German-Jewish tradition of political and moral intellectualism with which I identified. But living in Frankfurt, while it did not produce a wholly new "Jewish identity" to supplant a secular left-wing identification, it did encourage my thinking about relations between Germans and Jews, and Jews and the Left. These personal thoughts coincided with a rather bizarre episode. The American culture industry appeared to have made the topic of "Germans and Jews" a huge public discussion for the first time. This essay on the West German reaction to the tv film "Holocaust" represents my still uncompleted personal reflections as they intersect with a still uncompleted national debate. "Holocaust" was shown on West German television during the last week of January, 1979. An estimated 20 million viewers watched each of the four segments of the program.' In the weeks before and months following the telecast, West German newspapers and magazines were filled with material related to the program and its subject. It was not unusual to hear and read that West Germany had engaged in its first widespread public discussion of the

18 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The denazification and re-education process had both a punitive character and an educational objective as discussed by the authors, and the desire to punish those responsible led to an absurd system of classification according to the degree of guilt, which led to a crafty system of fakes, truncated biographies and exchanges of mutually accomodating testimony.
Abstract: The processes of "denazification" and of "re-education," undertaken by the Allies in 1945, had both a punitive character and an educational objective. The desire to punish those responsible led to an absurd system of classification according to the degree of guilt. The grotesque mechanism of individual statements, the questionnaires that Ernst von Salomon was to parody in 1951, gave birth to a crafty system of fakes, truncated biographies and exchanges of mutually accomodating testimony. For method's sake, the victors dealt first with the least complex cases. Therefore, those who were least guilty received a heavier punishment disproportionate to that of criminals whose sentences were meted out later with the Cold War or European integration in mind. It should also be noted that "re-education" to democracy by pedagogic methods, which were not always democratic, and by victors, who in no way upheld the values they claimed to embody, could not produce the expected results.

8 citations