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Journal ArticleDOI

Teaching Beginning Reading: A Case for Monitoring Feelings and Attitudes?

01 Apr 1997-Literacy (Blackwell Publishers Ltd)-Vol. 31, Iss: 1, pp 5-8
TL;DR: There is a good deal of evidence that children's feelings about and attitudes towards an activity they do in school can have a considerable bearing upon their success in that activity as discussed by the authors and this is true with regard to reading and reports on a study which explored the information teachers could glean from monitoring childrens feelings about reading.
Abstract: There is a good deal of evidence that children’s feelings about and attitudes towards an activity they do in school can have a considerable bearing upon their success in that activity. Hazel Francis suggests this is true with regard to reading and reports on a study which explored the information teachers could glean from monitoring children’s feelings about reading.
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01 Jan 2000
TL;DR: The authors reported an evaluation of the effectiveness of a volunteer tutor reading intervention in three socially disadvantaged schools and concluded that children receiving the intervention failed to make greater progress than same-school controls.
Abstract: This article reports an evaluation of the effectiveness of a volunteer tutor reading intervention. Volunteers were provided with instruction and supervision in order that they might assist class teachers in the teaching of reading. A strong emphasis upon phonological awareness and storytelling underpinned the programme. Intervention took place in reception classes in three socially disadvantaged schools that could provide parallel classes to serve as controls. Assessment immediately after the intervention, and 3 years later, indicated that children receiving the volunteer intervention failed to make greater progress than same-school controls. The article considers a number of possible reasons for the apparent failure of the intervention and concludes by cautioning against simplistic expectations that additional adult support should necessarily lead to gains in children's learning.

30 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors reported an evaluation of the effectiveness of a volunteer tutor reading intervention in three socially disadvantaged schools and concluded that children receiving the intervention failed to make greater progress than same-school controls.
Abstract: This article reports an evaluation of the effectiveness of a volunteer tutor reading intervention. Volunteers were provided with instruction and supervision in order that they might assist class teachers in the teaching of reading. A strong emphasis upon phonological awareness and storytelling underpinned the programme. Intervention took place in reception classes in three socially disadvantaged schools that could provide parallel classes to serve as controls. Assessment immediately after the intervention, and 3 years later, indicated that children receiving the volunteer intervention failed to make greater progress than same-school controls. The article considers a number of possible reasons for the apparent failure of the intervention and concludes by cautioning against simplistic expectations that additional adult support should necessarily lead to gains in children’s learning.

25 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: For instance, the authors found that attitude may affect the level of ability eventually attained by pupils, through its influence on engagement and practice, and even for confident readers, poor attitude may lead to a choice not to read when other option exist, a condition known as aliteracy.
Abstract: Good reading ability is the key to success in school (Swalander and Taube, 2007) and reading is an important factor in many language and cognitive skills and in the development of general knowledge and vocabulary (Logan and Johnston, 2009). However, despite widespread efforts to prevent reading problems, reading continues to be exceptionally difficult for many pupils (Martinez, Aricak and Jewell, 2008). Understanding the role of attitude in developing readers is important for two main reasons. Firstly, attitude may affect the level of ability eventually attained by pupils, through its influence on engagement and practice (Adam and Wild, 1997). Secondly, even for confident readers, poor attitude may lead to a choice not to read when other option exist, a condition known as aliteracy (McKenna, Kear and Ellsworth, 1995). Consequently, teachers cannot afford to ignore the attitudes of pupils since these are often important in the attainment of reading skills and in the continued use of reading for information and recreation (Alexander and Fuller, 1976). The aim of this study was to establish the reading attitudes and personal reading habits of Year 2 children in an attempt to assess how one impacts on the other. Factors that have been shown to affect children’s attitudes towards reading include age, achievement, gender, reading materials, home influences and the role of teachers, and several of these areas were examined in the study.

5 citations


Cites background from "Teaching Beginning Reading: A Case ..."

  • ...Francis, H. (1997) ‘Teaching beginning reading: a case for monitoring feelings and attitudes?’ Reading, 31 (1), pp. 5-8. Lever-Chain, J. (2008) ‘Turning boys off? Listening to what five-year-olds say about reading’, Literacy, 42 (2), pp....

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  • ...Francis, H. (1997) ‘Teaching beginning reading: a case for monitoring feelings and attitudes?’ Reading, 31 (1), pp. 5-8. Lever-Chain, J. (2008) ‘Turning boys off? Listening to what five-year-olds say about reading’, Literacy, 42 (2), pp. 83-91. Logan, S. & Johnston, R. (2009) ‘Gender differences in reading ability and attitudes: examining where these differences lie’, Journal of Research in Reading, 32 (2), pp. 199-214 Wiley Interscience [Online]. Available at: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/117986938/home?CRETRY=1&SR ETRY=0 (Accessed: 24 May 2009). Martinez, R. S., Aricak, O. T. & Jewell, J. (2008) ‘Influences of reading attitude on reading achievement: a test of the temporal-interaction model’, Psychology in the Schools, 45 (10), pp. 1010-1022 Wiley Interscience [Online]. Available at: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/home (Accessed: 1 March 2009). McKenna, M. C. (1994) ‘Toward a model of reading attitude acquisition’, in Cramer, E. H. & Castle, M. (ed.) Fostering the love of reading: the affective domain in reading education.Delaware: International Reading Association, pp. 18-40. McKenna, M. C., Kear, D. J. & Ellsworth, R. A. (1995) ‘Children’s attitudes toward reading: a national survey’, Reading Research Quarterly, 30 (4), pp. 934956. Mortimore, P., Sammons, P., Stoll, L., Lewis, D. & Ecob R. (1988) School matters: the junior years. Somerset: Open Books. Pickard, A. J. (2007) Research methods in information. London: Facet Publishing. Sainsbury, M. & Schagen, I. (2004) ‘Attitudes to reading at ages nine and eleven: National Foundation for Educational Resarch’, Journal of Research in Reading, 27 (4), pp. 373-386. Wiley InterScience [Online]. Available at: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/117986938/home?CRETRY=1&SR ETRY=0 (Accessed: 1 March 2009). Sanacore, J. (2006) ‘Nurturing lifetime readers’, Childhood Education, 83 (1), pp. 33-37 Infotrac [Online]. Available at: http://find.galegroup.com/itx/paginate.do?qrySerId=Locale%28en%2CUS%2C% 29%3AFQE%3D%28JN%2CNone%2C21%29%22Childhood+Education%22%3A And%3ALQE%3D%28DA%2CNone%2C8%2920060922%24&inPS=true&sort= DateDescend&searchType=PublicationSearchForm&tabID=T002&prodId=SPJ. SP01&searchId=R1&userGroupName=unn&currentPosition=21 (Accessed: 30 March 2009). Smith, S. (2004) ‘The non-fiction reading habits of young successful boy readers: forming connections between masculinity and reading’, Literacy, 38 (1), pp....

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  • ...Francis, H. (1997) ‘Teaching beginning reading: a case for monitoring feelings and attitudes?’ Reading, 31 (1), pp....

    [...]

  • ...Francis, H. (1997) ‘Teaching beginning reading: a case for monitoring feelings and attitudes?’ Reading, 31 (1), pp. 5-8. Lever-Chain, J. (2008) ‘Turning boys off? Listening to what five-year-olds say about reading’, Literacy, 42 (2), pp. 83-91. Logan, S. & Johnston, R. (2009) ‘Gender differences in reading ability and attitudes: examining where these differences lie’, Journal of Research in Reading, 32 (2), pp....

    [...]

  • ...Francis, H. (1997) ‘Teaching beginning reading: a case for monitoring feelings and attitudes?’ Reading, 31 (1), pp. 5-8. Lever-Chain, J. (2008) ‘Turning boys off? Listening to what five-year-olds say about reading’, Literacy, 42 (2), pp. 83-91. Logan, S. & Johnston, R. (2009) ‘Gender differences in reading ability and attitudes: examining where these differences lie’, Journal of Research in Reading, 32 (2), pp. 199-214 Wiley Interscience [Online]. Available at: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/117986938/home?CRETRY=1&SR ETRY=0 (Accessed: 24 May 2009). Martinez, R. S., Aricak, O. T. & Jewell, J. (2008) ‘Influences of reading attitude on reading achievement: a test of the temporal-interaction model’, Psychology in the Schools, 45 (10), pp. 1010-1022 Wiley Interscience [Online]. Available at: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/home (Accessed: 1 March 2009). McKenna, M. C. (1994) ‘Toward a model of reading attitude acquisition’, in Cramer, E....

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