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Teaching the Holocaust Through Film

01 Jan 2007-
About: The article was published on 2007-01-01 and is currently open access. It has received 2 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: The Holocaust.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, film depictions of the Holocaust have become a ubiquitous part of social studies education, as many states have mandated Holocaust or genocide curricula in recent years; however, the quality of the film depictions has not yet been evaluated.
Abstract: Film depictions of the Holocaust have become a ubiquitous part of social studies education, as many states have mandated Holocaust or genocide curricula in recent years; however, the quality of suc...

7 citations


Cites background from "Teaching the Holocaust Through Film..."

  • ...Presented as “passive and weak silhouettes” (Pijamalı, Filminde, & Ma gduriyeti, 2015, p.189), there is nearly a complete lack of voice for Holocaust victims in the film (Marcus, 2017, p. 173)....

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  • ...Paradoxically, that lack of agency also applies to Germans in the film, many of whom are depicted as “innocent and lacking any idea about what was happening around them” (Marcus, 2017, p. 173)....

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  • ...Marcus (2017) found that The Boy in the Striped Pajamas was the third most-used feature film in American classrooms (p. 170)....

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  • ...and the filmmakers’ embedded perspectives” (Marcus et al., 2006). Several pedagogical approaches can help students in this regard, from K-W-L handouts to anticipation guides (Stoddard & Marcus, 2010; Woelders, 2007). Students may be asked to create post-film presentations on the movie’s narrative, including a discussion of the content presented, an analysis of the historical period depicted, and a “discussion of how the period in which the movie was made influenced its perspective on the past” (Libresco, 2013, p. 262). This can include clips from the film to illustrate the students’ arguments. It is important to note that assignments do not necessarily have to be incorporated during the film’s viewing. In fact, this can prove to be counterproductive, because it sends an implicit signal to the students that the movie they are going to watch is not sufficiently engaging on its own merits but requires a task to prevent boredom or detachment. If a film is well made and engrossing, students will be able to complete assignments after the fact, although teachers then have to guard against the tendency for students to give the creators of well-liked movies the benefit of the doubt—to adopt, in effect, “the belief that the credibility of a source varies inversely with the degree of apparent human craftsmanship” (Gabella, 1994, p. 347). One example is the APPARTS approach, created by the College Board (2001). APPARTS asks students to examine the source in question, its origin and particulars, and—most importantly, for film analysis—the motives of the source’s creators....

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  • ...He would not have sat for hours at a time, peacefully, in a quiet spot of the camp to have chats or to think or rest (Marcus, 2017, p. 170)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a history teacher and visual art educator present a unique, arts-integrated history project that engaged grade eleven history students in creating an installation of suitcase assemblages exploring the lives of young victims of the Holocaust.
Abstract: In this article, we ‐ a history teacher and visual art educator ‐ present a unique, arts-integrated history project that engaged grade eleven history students in creating an installation of suitcase assemblages exploring the lives of young victims of the Holocaust. While we recognize that there exist numerous strategies for teaching about the Holocaust, we assert not only that arts integration is useful in enhancing student learning and engagement in history but also that the curricular approach is ideally suited for the teaching of difficult history such as the history of the Holocaust. In addition to examples of the student artworks produced, we provide evidence of the project’s success in increasing students’ understandings of the assigned historical content as well as its success in complicating two dominant Holocaust narratives. In sharing our own experiences of using an arts-integrated approach to teaching the history of the Holocaust, we hope to inspire both history teachers who are looking for alternative ways to tackle the complex challenge of teaching difficult history as well as art teachers who are looking to integrate sound historical inquiry into their issues-based art projects.

2 citations