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Journal ArticleDOI

Teaching to Transgress: Education as the Practice of Freedom

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Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors introduce a framework to guide researchers into a process of racial and cultural awareness, consciousness, and positionality as they conduct education research, arguing that dangers seen, unseen, and unforeseen can emerge for researchers when they do not pay careful attention to their own and others' racialized and cultural systems of coming to know, knowing, and experiencing the world.
Abstract: This author introduces a framework to guide researchers into a process of racial and cultural awareness, consciousness, and positionality as they conduct education research. The premise of the argument is that dangers seen, unseen, and unforeseen can emerge for researchers when they do not pay careful attention to their own and others’ racialized and cultural systems of coming to know, knowing, and experiencing the world. Education research is used as an analytic site for discussion throughout this article, but the framework may be transferable to other academic disciplines. After a review of literature on race and culture in education and an outline of central tenets of critical race theory, a nonlinear framework is introduced that focuses on several interrelated qualities: researching the self, researching the self in relation to others, engaged reflection and representation, and shifting from the self to system.

1,064 citations


Cites background from "Teaching to Transgress: Education a..."

  • ...Similarly, bell hooks (1994) made it explicit that Black female teachers carry with them gendered experiences and perspectives that have been (historically) silenced and marginalized in the discourses about teaching and learning....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors provide educators at all levels with a theoretical rationale for place-conscious education; they also discuss pedagogical pathways, and institutional challenges, to placeconsciousness, and conclude with an analysis of the possibilities for placeconscious education in an era that defines institutional accountability by standards and testing.
Abstract: This article provides educators at all levels with a theoretical rationale for place-conscious education; it also discusses pedagogical pathways, and institutional challenges, to place-consciousness. Drawing on insights from phenomenology, critical geography, bioregionalism, ecofeminism, and other place-conscious traditions, the author gathers diverse perspectives on “place” to demonstrate the profoundly pedagogical nature of human experience with places. Five “dimensions of place” are described that can shape the development of a socio-ecological, place-conscious education: (a) the perceptual, (b) the sociological, (c) the ideological, (d) the political, and (e) the ecological. After discussing these, the author reframes several place-conscious educational traditions. The article concludes with an analysis of the possibilities for place-conscious education in an era that defines institutional accountability by standards and testing.

1,019 citations


Cites background from "Teaching to Transgress: Education a..."

  • ...In her preface to Feminist Theory: From Margin to Center, hooks (1984) clearly evokes the pain and possibility of marginality with beautifully spatialized prose....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Using critical race theory as a framework, this article used counter-storytelling to examine the different forms of racial and gender discrimination experienced by Chicana and Chicano graduate students, including self doubt, survivor guilt, impostor syndrome, and invisibility.
Abstract: Using critical race theory as a framework, the article utilizes counter-storytelling to examine the different forms of racial and gender discrimination experienced by Chicana and Chicano graduate students. After describing the critical race theory framework and counter-storytelling method, the article moves to a story of two composite and data-driven characters, Professor Leticia Garcia and graduate student Esperanza Gonzalez. Various theoretical and conceptual issues such as self-doubt, survivor guilt, impostor syndrome, and invisibility are woven into Esperanza's graduate school and Professor Garcia's pre-tenure experiences.

782 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article focused on a representative sample from 200 teacher candidates' responses to Peggy McIntosh's article, "White Privilege: unpacking the invisible knapsack" and explored several strategies that teacher candidates employed to avoid addressing whiteness and its attendant privileges in Canadian society.
Abstract: This qualitative study focuses on a representative sample from 200 teacher candidates' responses to Peggy McIntosh's article, ‘White privilege: unpacking the invisible knapsack’. The notion and understanding of whiteness and white privilege were explored revealing several strategies that teacher candidates employed to avoid addressing whiteness and its attendant privileges in Canadian society. We analyse three primary strategies that the teacher candidates employed: ideological incongruence, liberalist notions of individualism and meritocracy, and the negation of white capital. Some implications of this study are that teacher education must help candidates understand their own racial identity formation and provide the learning space to work with the range of emotions and feelings of indignation that evolve from an exposure to white privilege and the ‘myth of meritocracy’.

502 citations


Cites background from "Teaching to Transgress: Education a..."

  • ...(p. 1) bell hooks (1994) also states that: … Often their rage erupts because they believe that all ways of looking that highlight the difference subvert the liberal belief in a universal subjectivity that they think will make racism disappear....

    [...]

  • ...According to hooks (1994): Oftentimes intellectual work compels confrontation with harsh realities....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors trace the genealogy of reflection in teacher education by seeking the conditions of its emergence through the influences of Descartes, Dewey, Schon, and feminism, and highlight the diversity of meanings that constitute understandings of the term and then critique the effects of power that reverberate through current reflective practices.
Abstract: This article traces the genealogy of reflection in teacher education by seeking the conditions of its emergence through the influences of Descartes, Dewey, Schon, and feminism. Drawing on the critical lenses of Foucaultian genealogy and the sociology of scientific knowledge, the analysis investigates how the complicated meanings of reflection get played out in complex and contradictory ways through research practices. The purpose of this article is to highlight the diversity of meanings that constitute understandings of the term and then to critique the effects of power that reverberate through current reflective practices.

472 citations


Cites background from "Teaching to Transgress: Education a..."

  • ...…reinforce existing stereotypes by taking sociological constructs of identity (e.g., race, class, and gender) and applying them to individuals in the form of expectations. bell hooks (1994) does not dismiss the possibility or even the desirability of strategic identification for political purposes....

    [...]

  • ...However, critiquing Diana Fuss’s work on essentialism, hooks (1994) calls attention to an insidious form of exclusion embedded in devices of identification: Fuss does not address how systems of domination already at work in the academy and the classroom silence the voices of individuals from…...

    [...]

References
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Journal Article
TL;DR: Auto-ethnography as mentioned in this paper is an approach to research and writing that seeks to describe and systematically analyze personal experience in order to understand cultural experience and treat research as a political, socially-just and socially-conscious act.
Abstract: Autoethnography is an approach to research and writing that seeks to describe and systematically analyze personal experience in order to understand cultural experience. This approach challenges canonical ways of doing research and representing others and treats research as a political, socially-just and socially-conscious act. A researcher uses tenets of autobiography and ethnography to do and write autoethnography. Thus, as a method, autoethnography is both process and product. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1101108

2,009 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors introduce a framework to guide researchers into a process of racial and cultural awareness, consciousness, and positionality as they conduct education research, arguing that dangers seen, unseen, and unforeseen can emerge for researchers when they do not pay careful attention to their own and others' racialized and cultural systems of coming to know, knowing, and experiencing the world.
Abstract: This author introduces a framework to guide researchers into a process of racial and cultural awareness, consciousness, and positionality as they conduct education research. The premise of the argument is that dangers seen, unseen, and unforeseen can emerge for researchers when they do not pay careful attention to their own and others’ racialized and cultural systems of coming to know, knowing, and experiencing the world. Education research is used as an analytic site for discussion throughout this article, but the framework may be transferable to other academic disciplines. After a review of literature on race and culture in education and an outline of central tenets of critical race theory, a nonlinear framework is introduced that focuses on several interrelated qualities: researching the self, researching the self in relation to others, engaged reflection and representation, and shifting from the self to system.

1,064 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors provide educators at all levels with a theoretical rationale for place-conscious education; they also discuss pedagogical pathways, and institutional challenges, to placeconsciousness, and conclude with an analysis of the possibilities for placeconscious education in an era that defines institutional accountability by standards and testing.
Abstract: This article provides educators at all levels with a theoretical rationale for place-conscious education; it also discusses pedagogical pathways, and institutional challenges, to place-consciousness. Drawing on insights from phenomenology, critical geography, bioregionalism, ecofeminism, and other place-conscious traditions, the author gathers diverse perspectives on “place” to demonstrate the profoundly pedagogical nature of human experience with places. Five “dimensions of place” are described that can shape the development of a socio-ecological, place-conscious education: (a) the perceptual, (b) the sociological, (c) the ideological, (d) the political, and (e) the ecological. After discussing these, the author reframes several place-conscious educational traditions. The article concludes with an analysis of the possibilities for place-conscious education in an era that defines institutional accountability by standards and testing.

1,019 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argues for attending to the perspectives of those most directly affected by, but least often consulted about, educational policy and practice: students, arguing that the argument for authorizing student perspectives runs counter to U.S. reform efforts, which have been based on adults' ideas about the conceptualization and practice of education.
Abstract: This article argues for attending to the perspectives of those most directly affected by, but least often consulted about, educational policy and practice: students. The argument for authorizing student perspectives runs counter to U.S. reform efforts, which have been based on adults’ ideas about the conceptualization and practice of education. This article outlines and critiques a variety of recent attempts to listen to students, including constructivist and critical pedagogies, postmodern and poststructural feminisms, educational researchers’ and social critics’ work, and recent developments in the medical and legal realms, almost all of which continue to unfold within and reinforce adults’ frames of reference. This discussion contextualizes what the author argues are the twin challenges of authorizing student perspectives: a change in mindset and changes in the structures in educational relationships and institutions.

938 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Using critical race theory as a framework, this article used counter-storytelling to examine the different forms of racial and gender discrimination experienced by Chicana and Chicano graduate students, including self doubt, survivor guilt, impostor syndrome, and invisibility.
Abstract: Using critical race theory as a framework, the article utilizes counter-storytelling to examine the different forms of racial and gender discrimination experienced by Chicana and Chicano graduate students. After describing the critical race theory framework and counter-storytelling method, the article moves to a story of two composite and data-driven characters, Professor Leticia Garcia and graduate student Esperanza Gonzalez. Various theoretical and conceptual issues such as self-doubt, survivor guilt, impostor syndrome, and invisibility are woven into Esperanza's graduate school and Professor Garcia's pre-tenure experiences.

782 citations