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Journal ArticleDOI

Ten simple rules for structuring papers

28 Sep 2017-PLOS Computational Biology (Public Library of Science)-Vol. 13, Iss: 9, pp 1-9
TL;DR: Focusing on how readers consume information, a set of ten simple rules are presented to help you communicate the main idea of the paper and make the process of writing more efficient and pleasurable.
Abstract: Good scientific writing is essential to career development and to the progress of science. A well-structured manuscript allows readers and reviewers to get excited about the subject matter, to understand and verify the paper9s contributions, and to integrate them into a broader context. However, many scientists struggle with producing high-quality manuscripts and are typically given little training in paper writing. Focusing on how readers consume information, we present a set of 10 simple rules to help you get across the main idea of your paper. These rules are designed to make your paper more influential and the process of writing more efficient and pleasurable.

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Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
H.B. Michaelson1
01 Jan 1981

304 citations

01 Jan 2016
Abstract: Thank you for downloading elements of style. As you may know, people have search hundreds times for their chosen novels like this elements of style, but end up in malicious downloads. Rather than reading a good book with a cup of coffee in the afternoon, instead they are facing with some infectious bugs inside their desktop computer. elements of style is available in our digital library an online access to it is set as public so you can download it instantly. Our digital library spans in multiple locations, allowing you to get the most less latency time to download any of our books like this one. Merely said, the elements of style is universally compatible with any devices to read.

169 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1979

98 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is demonstrated that feature-based learning is an efficient and adaptive strategy in dynamically changing environments and more importantly because it can increase adaptability without compromising precision of learning.
Abstract: Learning from reward feedback is essential for survival but can become extremely challenging with myriad choice options. Here, we propose that learning reward values of individual features can provide a heuristic for estimating reward values of choice options in dynamic, multi-dimensional environments. We hypothesize that this feature-based learning occurs not just because it can reduce dimensionality, but more importantly because it can increase adaptability without compromising precision of learning. We experimentally test this hypothesis and find that in dynamic environments, human subjects adopt feature-based learning even when this approach does not reduce dimensionality. Even in static, low-dimensional environments, subjects initially adopt feature-based learning and gradually switch to learning reward values of individual options, depending on how accurately objects’ values can be predicted by combining feature values. Our computational models reproduce these results and highlight the importance of neurons coding feature values for parallel learning of values for features and objects. Learning about a rewarded outcome is complicated by the fact that a choice often incorporates multiple features with differing association with the reward. Here the authors demonstrate that feature-based learning is an efficient and adaptive strategy in dynamically changing environments.

62 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The whole conformational landscape of GluT1 in the absence of glucose is elucidated using long molecular dynamics simulations and it is found that glucose transits along the pathway through significant rotational motions, while maintaining hydrogen bonds with the protein.
Abstract: Glucose plays a crucial role in the mammalian cell metabolism. In the erythrocytes and endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier, glucose uptake is mediated by the glucose transporter type 1 (GluT1). GluT1 deficiency or mutations cause severe physiological disorders. GluT1 is also an important target in cancer therapy as it is overexpressed in tumor cells. Previous studies have suggested that GluT1 mediates solute transfer through a cycle of conformational changes. However, the corresponding 3D structures adopted by the transporter during the transfer process remain elusive. In the present work, we first elucidate the whole conformational landscape of GluT1 in the absence of glucose, using long molecular dynamics simulations and show that the transitions can be accomplished through thermal fluctuations. Importantly, we highlight a strong coupling between intracellular and extracellular domains of the protein that contributes to the transmembrane helices reorientation during the transition. The conformations adopted during the simulations differ from the known 3D bacterial homologs structures resolved in similar states. In holo state simulations, we find that glucose transits along the pathway through significant rotational motions, while maintaining hydrogen bonds with the protein. These persistent motions affect side chains orientation, which impacts protein mechanics and allows glucose progression.

60 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The index h, defined as the number of papers with citation number ≥h, is proposed as a useful index to characterize the scientific output of a researcher.
Abstract: I propose the index h, defined as the number of papers with citation number ≥h, as a useful index to characterize the scientific output of a researcher.

8,996 citations

Book
Edward R. Tufte1
01 Jan 1990

3,631 citations

Book
01 Jan 1979
TL;DR: In this article, all the information and advice needed to write and publish a scientific paper is presented in a stylish and readable way, including new information on electronic manuscript preparation and the use of computers for tabulation.
Abstract: This book includes, in a stylish and readable way, all the information and advice needed to write and publish a scientific paper. This expanded edition contains new information on electronic manuscript preparation and the use of computers to create effective tabulation.

641 citations