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Journal ArticleDOI

Teorías sobre el inicio de la violencia filio-parental desde la perspectiva parental: un estudio exploratorio

TL;DR: In this paper, a study of 42 progenitores victimas de violencia filio-parental (VFP;18 padres and 24 madres) seleccionados by muestreo intencional teorico of two contextos: un centro de reforma de menores and un centre privado especializado en terapia de violence intrafamiliar.
Abstract: Objetivo.Conocer las teorias implicitas que utilizan los padres victimas de la violencia de sus hijos para explicar su inicio. Metodo.Se ha llevado a cabo un estudio cualitativo exploratorio siguiendo el metodo propuesto por la Teoria Fundamentada. La informacion fue obtenida a partir de seis grupos de discusion guiados por entrevistas semiestructuradas y analizada mediante ATLAS.ti 5.0. En total, participaron 42 progenitores victimas de violencia filio-parental (VFP;18 padres y 24 madres) seleccionados por muestreo intencional teorico de dos contextos: un centro de reforma de menores y un centro privado especializado en terapia de violencia intrafamiliar. Resultados. Los progenitores mantienen tres teorias para explicar el inicio de la VFP: (a) la teoria del alumno ausente, que alude al absentismo escolar como predictor de la conducta violenta; (b) la teoria del alumno consumidor, en la que el consumo de sustancias (alcohol, cannabis y cocaina) seria el factor antecedente; y (c) la teoria de la acumulacion de la tension, en la que se plantea la presencia de unos factores previos que contribuirian a incrementar el malestar (“rabia”) que antecederia el consumo abusivo de drogas y, posteriormente, la violencia hacia los padres. Conclusion. Los progenitores senalan que la VFP coincide con el comienzo de la etapa de educacion secundaria. Un aspecto comun a las tres teorias emergentes es que son factores distales y relacionados con el entorno que rodea a los adolescentes los principales desencadenantes de la VFP, quedando al margen variables relacionadas con la dinamica familiar.

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Citations
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DOI
31 Dec 2017

103 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors analyzed the relationship between child-to-parent violence and parental socialization styles with the problematic use of social networking sites, alexithymia and attitude towards institutional authority in adolescents.

31 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A lack of perceived parental warmth has important repercussions in the form of the psychological and social maladjustment of children, which in turn is differentially correlated with reactive or instrumental CPV.
Abstract: The relationship between child-to-parent violence (CPV) and the perceived parental warmth dimension has been well established. However, it is necessary to further investigate the nature of this relationship considering the involvement of other variables. The objective of this study was to analyze the role of cognitive (hostile attribution), emotional (anger), and social variables (deviant peer group and drug use) in the relationship between the perceived parental warmth dimension (warmth-communication and criticism-rejection) and CPV motivated by reactive or instrumental reasons. The community sample consisted of 1,599 Spanish adolescents (54.8% girls) between the ages of 12 and 18 years (M age = 14.6, SD = 1.6 years) from different secondary schools in Jaen (75.3%) and Oviedo (24.7%) (Spain). Each participant completed the Child-to-Parent Violence Questionnaire (CPV-Q), the Warmth Scale (WS), adolescents' version, the Social Information Processing (SIP) in Child-to-parent Conflicts Questionnaire and Deviant Peers and Drug Use Questionnaires. The results indicate that perceived parental warmth is negatively correlated with hostile attribution, adolescent anger, relationship with a deviant peer group, while perceived parental criticism is positively linked to these variables. Likewise, hostile attribution and adolescent anger are positively linked to reactive CPV. Relationship with a deviant peer group is associated with drug use, which also predicts both reactive and instrumental CPV. In sum, a lack of perceived parental warmth has important repercussions in the form of the psychological and social maladjustment of children, which in turn is differentially correlated with reactive or instrumental CPV. Thus, prevention and intervention programs for CPV should consider, on the one hand, working with parents on parental practices that incorporate parental warmth as a fundamental element and, on the other hand, working with children on cognitive, emotional, and social aspects, taking into account the different motivations for this type of violence.

14 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It was found that adolescents with high CPV presented lower values of positive attitude towards institutional authority (PATIA) and school climate (involvement, friendships and teacher’s help), and higher values ofpositive attitude towards the transgression of social norms (P PATTSN) and of perceived and ideal non-conformist social reputation (PNCSR and INCSR).
Abstract: Research into child-to-parent violence (CPV) has focused mainly on the description of individual and family variables of adolescents. It is observed that the school context has received little attention despite being a context of development of great importance. In order to deepen the understanding in this field, the objective of this study was to analyze the relationships between child-to-parent violence (CPV) and the attitude towards authority, social reputation and school climate. A total of 2101 Spanish adolescents (50.1% males and 49.9% females) from 13 to 18 years participated. A multivariate factorial design (MANOVA, 3 × 3) was carried out using as independent variables CPV level and age. It was found that adolescents with high CPV presented lower values of positive attitude towards institutional authority (PATIA) and school climate (involvement, friendships and teacher’s help), and higher values of positive attitude towards the transgression of social norms (PATTSN) and of perceived and ideal non-conformist social reputation (PNCSR and INCSR, respectively). Younger participants obtained the highest PATIA scores and lowest of PNCSR and the 15–16 years age group obtained the highest scores in PATTSN and INCSR. Adolescents aged 17–18 years show the highest scores in involvement and teacher’s help. Also, three interaction effects were found and indicated that there is an improvement in attitudinal and school adjustment indicators according to the age, except in ideal non-conformist social reputation, which has important practical implications.

13 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors identified the theoretical frameworks and explanatory factors for child-to-parent violence in Spanish and English from the following databases: Web of Science, Scopus, PsycINFO, ERIC and Dialnet Plus.
Abstract: Child-to-parent violence is a phenomenon with a fairly high prevalence rate and negative consequences at an individual, family and social level. The aim of this scoping review was to identify the theoretical frameworks and explanatory factors for this phenomenon. The review comprised studies written in English and Spanish since the year 2000, from the following databases: Web of Science, Scopus, PsycINFO, ERIC and Dialnet Plus. A total of 57 relevant studies were identified. The recurrent explanatory factors were: single parenthood, cohesion, stress, family discipline, history of violence, problems at school, clinical disorders and violent peer relationships. The concurrence of school, sibling and dating violence was particularly noteworthy. The theoretical frameworks referred to can be grouped into psychological, communicational, criminological, sociological and broader integrative models (Ecosystemic, Phenomenological and Constructivist). No data was found on interaction patterns, coping strategies or social perceptions of CPV which may influence families immersed in these kinds of situations.

8 citations

References
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Book
01 Jan 1998
TL;DR: Theoretical Foundations and Practical Considerations for Getting Started and Techniques for Achieving Theoretical Integration are presented.
Abstract: Part I: Introduction to Grounded Theory of Anselm Strauss Chapter 1: Inspiration and Background Chapter 2: Theoretical Foundations Chapter 3: Practical Considerations for Getting Started Chapter 4: Prelude to Analysis Chapter 5: Strategies for Qualitative Data Analysis Chapter 6: Memos and Diagrams Chapter 7: Theoretical Sampling Chapter 8: Context Chapter 9: Process Chapter 10: Techniques for Achieving Theoretical Integration Chapter 11: The Use of Computer Programs in Qualitative Data Analysis Part II: Research Demonstration Project Chapter 12 Open Coding: Identifying Concepts Chapter 13: Developing Concepts in Terms of Their Properties and Dimensions Chapter 14: Analyzing Data for Context Chapter 15: Bringing Process Into the Analysis Chapter 16: Integrating Categories Part III: Finishing the Research Project Chapter 17: Writing Theses, Monographs, and Dissertations, and Giving Talks About Your Research Chapter 18: Criteria for Evaluation Chapter 19: Student Questions and Answers

33,113 citations

Book
01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present strategies for qualitative data analysis, including context, process and theoretical integration, and provide a criterion for evaluation of these strategies and answers to student questions and answers.
Abstract: Introduction -- Practical considerations -- Prelude to analysis -- Strategies for qualitative data analysis -- Introduction to context, process and theoretical integration -- Memos and diagrams -- Theoretical sampling -- Analyzing data for concepts -- Elaborating the analysis -- Analyzing data for context -- Bringing process into the analysis -- Integrating around a concept -- Writing theses, monographs, and giving talks -- Criterion for evaluation -- Student questions and answers to these.

31,251 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss the importance of good qualitative data to improve Eduational practice, and propose a method to determine validity in qualitative inquiry in the context of theory into practice.
Abstract: (2000). Determining Validity in Qualitative Inquiry. Theory Into Practice: Vol. 39, Getting Good Qualitative Data to Improve Eduational Practice, pp. 124-130.

8,399 citations

Book
01 Jan 1993
TL;DR: Chapters 2-17 end with a Summary of Methodological Approaches to the Social World Conclusions.
Abstract: Chapters 2-17 end with a Summary CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION Why Study Research Methods? Methodological Approaches to the Social World Conclusions I. THE SCIENTIFIC AND ETHICAL CONTEXTS OF SOCIAL RESEARCH CHAPTER 2. THE NATURE OF SCIENCE The Aim of Science Science as Product Science as Process Science: Ideal versus Reality CHAPTER 3. RESEARCH ETHICS Data Collection and Analysis Treatment of Human Subjects Making Ethical Decisions The Uses of Research: Science and Society II. RESEARCH DESIGN CHAPTER 4. ELEMENTS OF RESEARCH DESIGN Origins of Research Topics Units of Analysis Variables Relationships Formulating Questions and Hypotheses Research Purposes and Research Design Stages of Social Research CHAPTER 5. MEASUREMENT The Measurement Process Levels of Measurement Reliability and Validity Reliability Assessment Validity Assessment A Final Note on Reliability and Validity CHAPTER 6. SAMPLING Why Sample? Population Definition Sampling Designs Probability Sampling Nonprobability Sampling Other Sampling Designs Factors Affecting Choice of Sampling Design Factors Determining Sample Size Final Notes on Sampling Errors and Generalizability III. METHODS OF DATA COLLECTION CHAPTER 7. EXPERIMENTATION The Logic of Experimentation Staging Experiments The Experiment as a Social Occasion Experimentation Outside the Laboratory CHAPTER 8. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGNS Threats to Internal Validity Pre-experimental Designs True Experimental Designs Factorial Experimental Designs Quasi-experimental Designs CHAPTER 9. SURVEY RESEARCH General Features of Survey Research The Uses and Limitations of Surveys Survey Research Designs Steps in Survey Research: Planning Face-to-Face and Telephone Interviewing Paper-and-Pencil Mailed Questionnaires Computer-Assisted Interviews Mixed-Mode Surveys Field Administration CHAPTER 10. SURVEY INSTRUMENTATION The Survey as a Social Occasion Materials Available to the Survey Designer "Sketches" or Preliminaries Filling in the Sketch: Writing the Items Pretesting CHAPTER 11. FIELD RESEARCH The Potentials and Limitations of Field Research Research Design and Sampling Field Observation Field Interviewing Stages of Field Research CHAPTER 12. RESEARCH USING AVAILABLE DATA Sources of Available Data Advantages of Research Using Available Data General Methodological Issues in Available-Data Research Historical Analysis Content Analysis CHAPTER 13. MULTIPLE METHODS Triangulation Multiple Measures of Concepts within the Same Study Multiple Tests of Hypotheses across Different Studies A Comparison of the Four Basic Approaches to Social Research Meta-Analysis CHAPTER 14. EVALUATION RESEARCH Framework and Sample Studies Types of Evaluation Research Methodological Issues in Evaluation Research The Social and Political Context of Evaluation Research IV. DATA PROCESSING, ANALYSIS, AND INTERPRETATION CHAPTER 15. DATA PROCESSING AND ELEMENTARY DATA ANALYSIS Preview of Analysis Steps Data Processing Data Matrices and Documentation The Functions of Statistics in Social Research Inspecting and Modifying the Data Preliminary Hypothesis Testing CHAPTER 16. MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS Modeling Relationships Elaboration: Tables and Beyond Multiple-Regression Analysis Other Modeling Techniques CHAPTER 17. WRITING RESEARCH REPORTS Searching the Literature Using the Internet Using the Library Outlining and Preparing to Write Major Headings Other Considerations Length

3,072 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Deviant behavior in grade 7, poor grades, and weak bonds with middle school predicted violent behavior 5 years later, and girls with low self-esteem during early adolescence were more likely to hit others later on.
Abstract: Objectives. This study sought to identify early predictors of adolescent violence and to assess whether they vary by sex and across different types and levels of violence. Methods. Data fV'om a 5-year longitudinal self-report survey of more than 4300 high school seniors and dropouts from California and Oregon were used to regress measures of relational, predatory, and overall violence on predictors measured 5 years earlier. Results. Deviant behavior in grade 7, poor grades, and weak bonds with middle school predicted violent behavior 5 years later. Attending a middle school with comparatively high levels of cigarette and marijuana use was also linked with subsequent violence. Early drug use and peer drug use predicted increased levels of predatory violence but not its simple occurrence. Girls with low self-esteern during early adolescence were more likely to hit others later on; boys who attended multiple elementary schools were also more likely to engage in relational violence, Conciusions. Violence prevention programs for younger adolescents should include efforts to prevent or reduce troublesome behavior in school and poor academic performance. Adolescent girls may also profit from efforts to raise self-esteem; adolescent boys may need extra training in resisting influences that encourage deviant behavior. Programs aimed at preventing drug use may yield an added violencereduction bonus, {Am J Public Heaith. 2000;90:566-572) During the last decade, violence has received increasing attention as a major public health issue for Americans of all ages,' Of particular concern is the degree to which violence affects the lives of youth, either as the perpetrators or as the victims of violence. Between 1985 and 1990, arrests for murder, manslaughter, and aggravated assault rose by 60% for children younger than 18 years,^ Between 1985 and 1991, homicide arrest rates actually declined among those older than 25 years, but they doubled among younger males,' These high rates of violence are mirrored by high rates of youth victimization, and violence and victimization tend to have common antecedents,"* Moreover, despite the fact that rates of violent crime have declined across all age groups since 1994, adolescents between the ages of 12 and 19 years remain at highest risk for victimization by violent crime,'

272 citations