scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Journal ArticleDOI

The Administration of the Mughal Empire

About: This article is published in Journal of the American Oriental Society.The article was published on 1967-01-23. It has received 13 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Empire & Administration (government).
Citations
More filters
Book
29 Mar 2016
TL;DR: Gagan D. Sood as mentioned in this paper focuses on ordinary people - traders, pilgrims, bankers, clerics, brokers, and scribes, among others - who were engaged in activities marked by large distances and long silences.
Abstract: Based on the chance survival of a remarkable cache of documents, India and the Islamic Heartlands recaptures a vanished and forgotten world from the eighteenth century spanning much of today's Middle East and South Asia. Gagan D. S. Sood focuses on ordinary people - traders, pilgrims, bankers, clerics, brokers, and scribes, among others - who were engaged in activities marked by large distances and long silences. By elucidating their everyday lives in a range of settings, from the family household to the polity at large, Sood pieces together the connective tissue of a world that lay beyond the sovereign purview. Recapturing this obscured and neglected world helps us better understand the region during a pivotal moment in its history, and offers new answers to old questions concerning early modern Eurasia and its transition to colonialism.

46 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Oct 1994-Ecumene
TL;DR: The relationship between tombs and gardens, the nature and measure of monumentality, and the logic of dynastic representation at Mughal funerary complexes is discussed in this paper.
Abstract: ~~ A Thatever differences they might have regarding the form and meaning of Mughals tombs, modern commentators agree on three basic points.’ Royal tombs were situated within square garden enclosures; they were monumental in size; and they were a distinctively Mughal form of dynastic representation (Figure 1). Surprisingly little detailed attention has been given to the relationships between tombs and gardens, the nature and measure of monumentality, or to the logic of dynastic representation at Mughal funerary complexes. This paper addresses these

20 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1985-Albion
TL;DR: The Indian subcontinent was the centerpiece, the so-called "crown jewel," of the British Empire as mentioned in this paper, which generated public tribute and private fortunes, titles for the royal family, "outdoor relief" for the ruling classes, and sepoy armies for far-flung imperial campaigns.
Abstract: India was the centerpiece, the so-called "crown jewel," of the British Empire. The Indian subcontinent generated public tribute and private fortunes, titles for the royal family, "outdoor relief" for the ruling classes, and sepoy armies for far-flung imperial campaigns. ' To protect the sea route to India, Britain acquired southern Africa. The defense of India dominated imperial relations with Russia, dictated British policy in the Eastern Mediterranean, and precipitated the invasion of Egypt, as well as subsequent conquests in eastern Africa. Britain employed India as her principal base for the Far Eastern trade; she used Indian indentured laborers to revive flagging sugar economies in Mauritius, British Guiana, and Trinidad.2 No region of the British Empire afforded more pomp, more power, or more prestige than India. Yet no significant region of the Empire is so poorly understood or sparsely studied by American scholars. Apart from its significance for imperial history, the Indian subcontinent commands our attention by virtue of its profound influence on world history. It is the seat of some of the world's oldest surviving cultures, and it remains a vitally important, perhaps pivotal, region in contemporary world politics. Social, economic, and demographic developments in southern Asia will have critical impact upon the shape of the world in the twenty-first century. Yet American universities employ few South Asian specialists. There is a paucity of college courses in Indian history, and many college libraries in the United States, responding to internal curriculum requirements and budgetary restraints, have acquired only the most limited holdings on the history and culture of the subcontinent. The purpose of this article is to encourage wider study of India. It ex-

14 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2007
TL;DR: In this article, a historical study of Persian role at the Mughal Court and its contribution to the development of the Indian subcontinent has been presented, where the authors highlighted the impact of Persian language and literature on other spheres of India.
Abstract: This dissertation renders the Persians role at the Mughal Court that was really their enormous contribution which provided Mughal Empire an additional glory, ecstasy and magnificence in its enterprise. Thus the significance of this historical study stems from a huge and multidimensional role played by the Persians at the Mughal Court and as well in the annals of Mughal India, as a consequence of their continuous migration towards Indian Sub-continent. The research shows a historical background of over-all Indo-Persian relations that has been occurred during ancient and medieval times before the advent of Mughal Empire in India. It purports the causes of migration of Persian emigrants towards Mughal India and their key role in the politics and administration along with its comparison with other fractions of nobility which were prevailing in India. Dissertation also unfolds the religious role of Persians in separate epochs during the Mughal regime, in view of the establishment of Safawid Dynasty in Persia and its Safawid religious propaganda. It underlines the Persians role in the language and literature during the Mughal regime as well as the causes of migration of Persian men-of-pen towards Mughal India. It cogently highlights the impact of Persian language and literature on other spheres of India. In addition, it also discloses Persians gigantic role in the Mughal culture, arts and society and deals with the analysis of some of the Persian cultural customs, traditions in Mughal culture and society that resulted by the firm interactions with the Persians. Self-made analytical data tables support the entire role of Persians at the Mughal Court throughout the research period. Dissertation concludes that Mughal rulers of India kept up the closest of contacts with Persia and there was a stream of talented Persians which comprised administrators, theologians, scholars and artists coming over the Indian frontiers to seek fame and fortune at the brilliant Court of the Great Mughals. They performed a crucial role in trimming and enterprising the multidimensional aspects of entire Mughal period under study

7 citations


Cites background from "The Administration of the Mughal Em..."

  • ...The earliest refugees arrived in the area of Div or Diew, a small island lying to the south-west of the peninsula of Kathiawar, Afterwards, they gradually found asylum chiefly in Gujarat, Bombay, and in a few towns and villages mostly to the north of Bombay, but also at Karachi (Pakistan) and Bangalore (Karnataka, India).(53) Although they are not, strictly speaking, a caste, since they are not Hindus, they form a welldefined community....

    [...]

  • ...He is said to be an excellent poet of Humayun’s Court, and wrote several Masnavis and Qasidas of which some he dedicated to the Emperor.(53) Muhammad Asghar Ashraf Khan mir-munshi was a Hussaini Saiyid from Mashhad....

    [...]

  • ...It was understood that the dominant partners in the empire were the orthodox Muslims and also that the emperor belonged to the same group.(53) Tara Chand says there were also “some among Shi’ahs who refused to believe in the open meaning of the Holy Quran and who interpreted it allegorically....

    [...]

  • ...According to Afzal Hussain important Persian nobles among them were include; Bairam Khan, Afzal Khan mir bakhshi, Muhammad Asghar Ashraf Khan mir munshi, Khwaja Abdul Majid diwan, Khwaja Attaullah diwan-i-bayutat, Mir Shihab-ud-Din mir saman, Khwaja Abdul Qasim, Mirza Nijabat and Mir Hasan, who were all important nobles.(53) However, Kewal Ram the author of Tadhkirat-al-Umara also pointed out four more names of Persian nobles who were escorted with Humayun when he returned back to India, these were; Peshro Khan Sa’adat (a servant of Tehmasp), Mun’im Khan,(54) Muhammad Quli Khan Yazdi and Naqabat Khan....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explained the very basic concept of land ownership and its application in the context of Pakistan's land ownership problem, which is considered an expression of power and superiority in Pakistan like many other countries in the world.
Abstract: Landlordism is still considered an expression of power and superiority in Pakistan like many other countries in the world. This paper is aimed at: (1) to explain the very basic concept of land owne...

7 citations