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Journal ArticleDOI

The Australian Legend

01 Oct 1959-Journal of American Folklore-Vol. 72, Iss: 286, pp 364
About: This article is published in Journal of American Folklore.The article was published on 1959-10-01. It has received 516 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Legend.
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01 Jan 1971

296 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors evaluate the hypotheses advanced by various writers from Karl Marx onward to explain the absence of an effective socialist party on the American political scene and conclude that any of the hypotheses are valid, they should also help to account for the variation among working-class movements in other parts of the world.
Abstract: From my work on my doctoral dissertation (Lipset 1950, 1968) down to the present, I have been interested in the problem of “American exceptionalism.” That curious phrase emerged from the debate in the international Communist movement in the 1920s concerning the sources of the weakness of left-wing radical movements in the United States (Draper 1960, pp. 268-72; Lipset 1977a, pp. 107-61). The key question repeatedly raised in this context has been, is America qualitatively different from other industrial capitalist countries? Or, to use Sombart's words, “Why is there no Socialism in the United States?” (Sombart 1976).In a forthcoming book, I evaluate the hypotheses advanced by various writers from Karl Marx onward to explain the absence of an effective socialist party on the American political scene. (For a preliminary formulation, see Lipset 1977b, pp. 31-149, 346-63.) If any of the hypotheses are valid, they should also help to account for the variation among working-class movements in other parts of the world. In this article, therefore, I shall reverse the emphasis from that in my book and look at socialist and working-class movements comparatively, applying elsewhere some of the propositions that have been advanced to explain the American situation.

147 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors explored the conceptual problems and contextual assumptions found in the treatment of Britishness in Australian history, especially as it has affected the understanding of Australia's relations with the world, and the implications of this for tensions between the community of culture and the community interest in Australia.
Abstract: This article explores the conceptual problems and contextual assumptions found in the treatment of Britishness in Australian history, especially as it has affected the understanding of Australia's relations with the world. It examines firstly the problem of the teleology of nationalism and its uses in Australian history, secondly the notion of Britishness in Australian identity, thirdly the Australian view of Britain and the Empire/Commonwealth in the twentieth century and lastly the implications of this for tensions between the community of culture and the community of interest in Australia.

137 citations