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The Autobiographical Community: Local Historiography in Classical and Hellenistic Greece

01 Jan 2013-
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present an overview of the community and community auto-biography in Greece, focusing on the following parts: 1.1. COMMUNITY AND COMMUNITY AUTOBIOGRAPHY 9 1.2.
Abstract: iv' ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS' ' viii' INTRODUCTION 1 PART I: COMMUNITY AND COMMUNITY AUTOBIOGRAPHY 9 1.1$$$$$COMMUNITY$ 9$ 1.1.1''COMMUNITY'AND'LOCALITY' 9' 1.1.2''COMMUNITY'AND'SOCIETY' 13' 1.1.3''COMMUNITY'AND'MEMORY' 19' 1.1.4''COMMUNITY'AND'HISTORY' 38' ' 1.2$$$$$LOCAL$HISTORIES$ 42' 1.2.1''SOME'DEFINITIONS' 42' 1.2.2''SNAPSHOTS'OF'LOCAL'HISTORY' 47' ' 1.3$$$$$LOCAL$HISTORY$AS$COMMUNITY$AUTOBIOGRAPHY$ 113' PART II: GREEK LOCAL HISTORIOGRAPHY 123 2.1$$$$$τοπικὴ ἱστορία$ 123 2.1.1''LOCAL'HISTORIOGRAPHY'IN'GREECE:'AN'INDIGENOUS'FORM' 123' 2.1.2''THE'RECEPTION'AND'STUDY'OF'GREEK'LOCAL'HISTORIOGRAPHY' 140' ' 2.2$$$$CASE$STUDIES$ 173$ $ $ 2.2.1''GREEK'LOCALITIES' 173' ' 2.2.2'''Σαμίων Ὧροι 177 2.2.2.1$A$BRIEF$HISTORY$OF$SAMOS' 178' 2.2.2.2$LOCAL$HISTORIANS$OF$SAMOS' 190' $$$$$$$A)$TO$THE$END$OF$THE$FOURTH$CENTURY$ 195' $$$$$$$B)$DOURIS$OF$SAMOS$ 212' 2.2.2.3$$THE$SOURCES$OF$SAMIAN$LOCAL$HISTORIOGRAPHY' 224' $$$$$$$A)$THE$HERAION' 227' $$$$$$$B)$PROVERBS' 237' ' '
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, Imagined communities: Reflections on the origin and spread of nationalism are discussed. And the history of European ideas: Vol. 21, No. 5, pp. 721-722.

13,842 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2010

944 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, Imagined communities: Reflections on the origin and spread of nationalism are discussed. And the history of European ideas: Vol. 21, No. 5, pp. 721-722.

13,842 citations


"The Autobiographical Community: Loc..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Frederik Barth (1969), for example, posited that the boundaries by which ethnic groups are defined are social and need not correspond to land;17 Benedict Anderson (1983), although nominally addressing nations, popularized the notion of “imagined communities”; and Anthony P. Cohen (1985) drew attention to the “symbolic construction of community,” whereby “the quintessential referent of community is that its members make, or believe they make, a similar sense of things either generally or with respect to specific and significant interest, and, further, that they think that that sense may differ from one made elsewhere.”...

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  • ...Frederik Barth (1969), for example, posited that the boundaries by which ethnic groups are defined are social and need not correspond to land;(17) Benedict Anderson (1983),...

    [...]

Book
29 Apr 1983
TL;DR: This article explored examples of this process of invention -the creation of Welsh Scottish national culture, the elaboration of British royal rituals in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the origins of imperial ritual in British India and Africa, and the attempts by radical movements to develop counter-traditions of their own.
Abstract: Many of the traditions which we think of as very ancient in their origins were not in fact sanctioned by long usage over the centuries, but were invented comparative recently. This book explores examples of this process of invention - the creation of Welsh Scottish 'national culture'; the elaboration of British royal rituals in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; the origins of imperial ritual in British India and Africa; and the attempts by radical movements to develop counter-traditions of their own. This book addresses the complex interaction of past and present, bringing together historicans and anthropologists in a fascinating study of ritual and symbolism which possess new questions for the understanding of our history.

7,291 citations

Book
01 Jan 1983
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present an EPISODIC/SEMANTIC DISTINCTION and a general overview of the ECPHORY system in a general framework.
Abstract: PART I: EPISODIC/SEMANTIC DISTINCTION PART II: GENERAL ABSTRACT PROCESSING SYSTEM PART III: SYNERGISTIC ECPHORY

4,757 citations

Book
25 Aug 1989
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors provide an account of how bodily practices are transmitted in, and as, traditions, and argue that images of the past and recollected knowledge are conveyed and sustained by ritual performances and that performative memory is bodily.
Abstract: In treating memory as a cultural rather than an individual faculty, this book provides an account of how bodily practices are transmitted in, and as, traditions. Most studies of memory as a cultural faculty focus on written, or inscribed transmissions of memories. Paul Connerton, on the other hand, concentrates on bodily (or incorporated) practices, and so questions the currently dominant idea that literary texts may be taken as a metaphor for social practices generally. The author argues that images of the past and recollected knowledge of the past are conveyed and sustained by ritual performances and that performative memory is bodily. Bodily social memory is an essential aspect of social memory, but it is an aspect which has until now been badly neglected. An innovative study, this work should be of interest to researchers into social, political and anthropological thought as well as to graduate and undergraduate students.

3,318 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors extend these ideas about narrative to the analysis of the stories we tell about our lives: our "autobiographies" Philosophically speaking, the approach I shall take to narrative is a constructivist one a view that takes as its central premise that "world making" is the principal function of mind, whether in the sciences or in the arts.
Abstract: indeed may not be quite possible But I have no doubt it is worth a try It has to do with the nature of thought and with one of its uses It has been traditional to treat thought, so to speak, as an instrument of reason Good thought is right reason, and its efficacy is measured against the laws of logic or induction Indeed, in its most recent computational form, it is a view of thought that has sped some of its enthusiasts to the belief that all thought is reducible to machine computability But logical thought is not the only or even the most ubiquitous mode of thought For the last several years, I have been looking at another kind of thought (see, eg, Bruner, 1986), one that is quite different in form from reasoning: the form of thought that goes into the construction not of logical or inductive arguments but of stories or narratives What I want to do now is to extend these ideas about narrative to the analysis of the stories we tell about our lives: our "autobiographies" Philosophically speaking, the approach I shall take to narrative is a constructivist one a view that takes as its central premise that "world making" is the principal function of mind, whether in the sciences or in the arts But the moment one applies a constructivist view of narrative to the self-narrative, to the autobiography, one is faced with dilemmas Take, for example, the constructivist view that "stories" do not "happen" in the real world but, rather, are constructed in people's heads Or as Henry James once put it, stories happen to people who know how to tell them Does that mean that our autobiographies are constructed, that they had better be viewed not as a record of what

2,671 citations