scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Journal ArticleDOI

The Boy in the Striped Pajamas: Critical Analysis of a Film Depiction of the Holocaust

02 Nov 2018-The Social Studies (Routledge)-Vol. 109, Iss: 6, pp 294-308
TL;DR: In this paper, film depictions of the Holocaust have become a ubiquitous part of social studies education, as many states have mandated Holocaust or genocide curricula in recent years; however, the quality of the film depictions has not yet been evaluated.
Abstract: Film depictions of the Holocaust have become a ubiquitous part of social studies education, as many states have mandated Holocaust or genocide curricula in recent years; however, the quality of suc...
Citations
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI

36 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article pointed out that historical novels, films, and other media can disrupt or reinforce dominant narratives about the past, and educators must be careful that when they attempt to select material from a range of seemingly different media sources.
Abstract: Historical novels, films, and other media can disrupt or reinforce dominant narratives about the past. Educators must be careful that when they attempt to select material from a range of seemingly ...

5 citations


Cites background from "The Boy in the Striped Pajamas: Cri..."

  • ...Rich and Pearcy (2018) provided a critical analysis of The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, a 2008 film adaption of the 2006 novel by John Boyne....

    [...]

  • ...Rather, it was the very premise and unfolding of the friendship between Shmuel and Bruno given the historical realities children like them faced that was an inaccuracy so massive it could lead to a “seriously flawed understanding of the Holocaust” (Rich & Pearcy, 2018, p. 299)....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the film-based practices of four social studies teachers were examined using a qualitative methodology and interviewed teachers twice over a 2-month period, collected handouts, and collec...
Abstract: The film-based practices of four social studies teachers were examined using a qualitative methodology. The research interviewed teachers twice over a 2-month period, collected handouts, and collec...

3 citations


Cites background from "The Boy in the Striped Pajamas: Cri..."

  • ...Rich and Pearcy (2018) have pointed to this need to be attentive to the inaccuracies present in film used in classrooms to ensure that the versions of events that students carry out of instruction ring true....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , a qualitative study of an optional course taught annually over seven years, the authors discussed how an interdisciplinary and historically grounded program of study can be delivered which seeks to enable students to acquire a sophisticated understanding of the Holocaust.
Abstract: ABSTRACT Drawing upon a qualitative study of an optional course taught annually over seven years, considerations are discussed around how an interdisciplinary and historically grounded programme of study can be delivered which seeks to enable students to acquire a sophisticated understanding of the Holocaust. Particular consideration is given to the defining of key terms as well as how to develop an understanding of the Holocaust which more appropriately reflects the phenomenon’s evolution, complexity and jurisdictional variations. The study also explores how students understand comparative genocide with a focus on both the Holocaust and the Genocide Against the Tutsi in Rwanda.
References
More filters
01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: This new report builds on earlier work by critically examining English school students’ knowledge and understanding of this history by reviewing English school teachers’ experience of and attitudes towards teaching about the Holocaust.
Abstract: This research report has been written under the auspices of the University College London (UCL) Centre for Holocaust Education. The Centre is part of the UCL Institute of Education – currently the world’s leading university for education – and is comprised of a team of researchers and educators from a variety of different disciplinary fields. The Centre works in partnership with the Pears Foundation who, together with the Department for Education, have co-funded its operation since it was first established in 2008. A centrally important principle of all activity based at the UCL Centre for Holocaust Education is that, wherever possible, classroom practice should be informed by academic scholarship and relevant empirical research. In 2009, Centre staff published an extensive national study of secondary school teachers’ experience of and attitudes towards teaching about the Holocaust (Pettigrew et al. 2009). This new report builds on that earlier work by critically examining English school students’ knowledge and understanding of this history. In both cases, research findings have been – and will continue to be – used to develop an innovative and ground-breaking programme of continuing professional development (CPD) for teachers and educational resources that are uniquely responsive to clearly identified classroom needs. The UCL Centre for Holocaust Education is the only institution of its kind, both within the United Kingdom and internationally, where pioneering empirical research is placed at the heart of work to support teachers and their students encountering this profoundly important yet complex and challenging subject in schools. The Centre offers a wide-ranging educational programme appropriate to teachers at all stages of their careers through a carefully constructed ‘pathway of professional development’. This provides opportunities for individuals to progressively deepen their knowledge and improve their practice. It offers a national programme of Initial Teacher Education in Holocaust education and a variety of in-depth and subject-specific CPD. In addition, the Centre also offers online distance learning facilities, including a fully accredited taught Masters-level module The Holocaust in the Curriculum. Through its Beacon School programme, Centre staff work intensively with up to 20 schools across England each year in order to recognise and further develop exemplary whole-school approaches and effective pedagogy. All of the courses and classroom materials developed by the UCL Centre for Holocaust Education are available free of charge to teachers working in England’s statefunded secondary schools. Further information can be found at www.ioe.ac.uk/holocaust.

85 citations


"The Boy in the Striped Pajamas: Cri..." refers background in this paper

  • ...The study concluded that students had generally limited knowledge that was based on misunderstandings or inaccurate information (Foster et al., 2016)....

    [...]

  • ...…Center for Holocaust Education at University College-London completed the most extensive student study to date, a mixed-methods examination of Holocaust content knowledge that surveyed nearly 8,000 students ages 11–18 and interviewed approximately 250 students in focus groups (Foster et al., 2016)....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors assess the potential of Holocaust education as a medium for developing "maximalist" notions of citizenship among students of secondary school age, with particular attention given to...
Abstract: In this paper we assess the potential of Holocaust education as a medium for developing ‘maximalist’ notions of citizenship among students of secondary school age. Particular attention is given to ...

61 citations


"The Boy in the Striped Pajamas: Cri..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Research has repeatedly shown that Holocaust education improves awareness of human rights issues, including concepts of genocide, stereotyping, and scapegoating (Ben-Peretz, 2003; Carrington & Short, 1997; Davies, 2000; Schweber, 2003; Short, Supple, & Klinger, 1998; Totten, 2000)....

    [...]

  • ...Although it does not end racism or antisemitism,1 Holocaust education positively impacts student interaction (Carrington & Short, 1997; Cowan & Maitles, 2007) because Holocaust teaching “perhaps more effectively than any other subject, has the power to sensitize [students] to the dangers of…...

    [...]

Book
27 Nov 2002
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss non-representation, nonrepresentation and responses to representation in the context of the Holocaust in education and literature in education select bibliographies.
Abstract: Introduction 1. Non-Representation 2. Writing History: Creating Fictions 3. Crossing Borders: Autobiographical Fiction? 4. Responses to Representation Conclusion: Understanding the Holocaust? Literature in Education Select Bibliography

61 citations


"The Boy in the Striped Pajamas: Cri..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Kokkola (2003) terms this a “cultural anachronism,” an avoidance of an element that would inhibit what the work’s creator sees as a larger goal: “anachronisms such as avoiding representing antisemitic attitudes in a prominent character can allow an author to tell the child reader about National…...

    [...]

  • ...This disables inquiry, and in so doing, tends to “shut down gaps and spaces for a child reader to ask questions,” leading to what one critic termed “a dialog with silence” (Maguire, 2012, p. 60; Kokkola, 2003, p. 80)....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that the use of film as a source of history in high school social studies classes can be beneficial to students' ability to view historical representation critically and develop critical and media literacy skills necessary for 21st century citizens.
Abstract: In a world where students and the general public are likely to access historical information from a television program, film, or even video game, it is important to equip students with the ability to view historical representation critically. In this essay we present arguments for using film to engage students in rigorous and authentic social studies pedagogy and support these arguments with data and examples from our research over the past ten years. Our goal is not to promote film as the ultimate classroom source or as a replacement for a teacher, but to highlight how effective the use of film can be in engaging students in authentic intellectual work with important content and issues. If we have learned anything from our research on using film to teach about the past, it is that it is important to have a clear purpose for selecting a film, both justifying the use of time and presenting the perspective that the teacher wants to portray. ********** In school districts across the country, films are being restricted or even banished from the social studies classroom. In one Connecticut town, the Board of Education banned the use of all R-rated feature films in high school social studies classes in reaction to a parent complaint about a teacher's showing of Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 9/11. Films are not the only media on the mob's pitchfork (or blog) as a group of parents in the same town urged the board to remove Mark Twain's book The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn as well from the schoolhouse doors. The board eventually relented in favor of the teachers on both issues, although under the caveat that all R-rated films were subject to board approval. Seizing on the learning opportunity created by the racially-charged controversy that surrounded Huckleberry Finn, a teacher in the district showed The Jazz Singer (1927) as well as clips from more modern films such as Norbit (2007) and Soul Man (1986) to discuss blackface and racial stereotyping. Despite obstacles, this teacher thoughtfully and effectively used film to challenge his students to face a critical and important historical and contemporary issue in his social studies classroom. Over the last decade, we have found innumerable examples of social studies teachers' use of film, such as in the Connecticut town described above, that engage students in thoughtful and critical exploration of past and contemporary social or political issues. These examples of practice where film is used as part of critical inquiry and complex intellectual work provide evidence for why film should be used in the social studies classroom but in ways that go beyond the stereotypical philosophy of showing film-with little preview or follow-up-that often leads to the aforementioned scrutiny of teacher use of film. These practices also highlight the development of the critical and media literacy skills necessary for 21st century citizens. Should Films be Viewed in the High School Classroom? Should film even be used given the numerous issues in the high school classroom, such as the possibility of controversy, the view of films used as "babysitters," or the lack of students' critical viewing skills? Although praxis with film has often been critiqued, one of the strongest arguments for using film in the classroom is that film and similar media serve a larger role as historical sources for the public at large. We now know that many people outside of the classroom are not learning about history from reading books or from engaging in primary source research; instead, they are learning what they know about the past from engaging with media such as film, web based media, or video games (Rosenstone, 1995, 2006; Seixas, 1994). The impact of the heightened role of film as a source of history in society is illustrated in Wineburg, Mosborg, Porat, and Duncan's (2007) study that examines how people learn about history, in their case the history of the Vietnam War. …

56 citations


"The Boy in the Striped Pajamas: Cri..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Several pedagogical approaches can help students in this regard, from K-W-L handouts to anticipation guides (Stoddard & Marcus, 2010; Woelders, 2007)....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the immediate and longer term effects of Holocaust education on pupils' values and attitudes were investigated in a longitudinal study with primary pupils aged 11-12 years and followed them into the first year of secondary to examine whether the general improvements in attitudes found in the first stage of the research has been maintained.
Abstract: Previous research on teaching the Holocaust, primarily case studies in either the primary or the secondary sectors, suggests that Holocaust education can contribute to pupils' citizenship values in a positive way Yet, in common with other initiatives, this evidence focuses exclusively on the short term impact of Holocaust education Our ongoing longitudinal research is concerned with both the immediate and longer term effects of Holocaust education on pupils' values and attitudes Initially focused on primary pupils aged 11–12 years, it has followed them into the first year of secondary to examine whether the general improvements in attitudes found in the first stage of the research has been maintained Further, we are able to compare their attitudes with pupils in their year who did not study the Holocaust in their primary schools This article draws conclusions from this study

53 citations


"The Boy in the Striped Pajamas: Cri..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Although it does not end racism or antisemitism,1 Holocaust education positively impacts student interaction (Carrington & Short, 1997; Cowan & Maitles, 2007) because Holocaust teaching “perhaps more effectively than any other subject, has the power to sensitize [students] to the dangers of…...

    [...]