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Journal ArticleDOI

The Challenges and Successes of Department Governance: A Look at HBCU Journalism and Mass Communications Unit Administrators.

09 Jul 2012-Contemporary Issues in Education Research (Clute Institute. 6901 South Pierce Street Suite 239, Littleton, CO 80128. Tel: 303-904-4750; Fax: 303-978-0413; e-mail: Staff@CluteInstitute.com; Web site: http://www.cluteinstitute.com)-Vol. 5, Iss: 3, pp 215-226
TL;DR: In this paper, the Journal and Mass Communication (JMC) units at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) are faced with the personal challenge of tenuous term limits - served at the discretion of higher administrators - and teaching two or three classes.
Abstract: Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) are facing challenges to their continued existence on several fronts. One is fiscally, as federal funding for education has been cut and the responsibility for paying for higher education has been levied on students and parents. Another challenge is the amount of endowment dollars available to them and lastly, there are questions today as to if HBCUs are still needed in a society that has allowed African-Americans to enroll in Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs). Administrators of the 55 Journalism and Mass Communication (JMC) units at HBCUs have to lead with an eye on tradition while dealing with current financial issues. The administrators are faced with the personal challenge of tenuous term limits - served at the discretion of higher administrators - and teaching two or three classes. They work under larger units and have minimal authority over budgets, hiring, or strategic planning for their units.

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Citations
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01 Jan 1994
TL;DR: The role of HBCU's Faculty in Teaching Diversity Diversity Diversity: How to Institutionalize and Solidify a New Status as mentioned in this paper The role of the Faculty in teaching diversity Diversity and HBCUs: Definitions, history and issues Implementing Reform Efforts Changing the Academic Subcultures via the Formal Curriculum Recruiting Admitting and Retaining the White Minority Cooperative Arrangements: Taking the Lead in Social Change Making the Campus Friendly to Other Race Students: Modifying the Extracurriculum HBCUE Diversity Transition Model: Building Bridges Between Cultures
Abstract: Preface Diversity and the HBCU: Definitions, History and Issues Implementing Reform Efforts Changing the Academic Subcultures via the Formal Curriculum Recruiting Admitting and Retaining the White Minority Cooperative Arrangements: Taking the Lead in Social Change Making the Campus Friendly to Other Race Students: Modifying the Extracurriculum HBCU Diversity Transition Model: Building Bridges Between Cultures The Role of HBCU's Faculty in Teaching Diversity Diversity: How to Institutionalize and Solidify a New Status

34 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2021
TL;DR: This paper examined the largest HBCUs by undergraduate enrollment to find that most schools with JMC programs offer either a course in entrepreneurship and or some business or entrepreneurship access on their campus.
Abstract: For students studying journalism at HBCUs, there is a need for increased training in entrepreneurial journalism to offset the vastly changing media landscape and to train future media practitioners to become enterprising and to tell their own stories. However, in light of the ongoing challenges faced by many HBCUs, students receive a variety of entrepreneurial experiences ranging from moderate to sparing to none. In light of the new demands of the 21st century and the current shift to an entrepreneurship based economy, particularly within the media industries, this study using institutional theory examines the largest HBCUs by undergraduate enrollment to find that most schools with JMC programs offer either a course in entrepreneurship and or some business or entrepreneurship access on their campus. In order to ensure that all students who wish to become entrepreneurs receive adequate training during the foundational years of an undergraduate program, this study examines some of the barriers and challenges facing some universities and outlines suggestions and best practices.
01 Jan 2014

Cites background from "The Challenges and Successes of Dep..."

  • ...While institutions could educate their students in fields such as teaching and agriculture, journalism was not among the disciplines to be offered and there were no real options for African-Americans to go to HBCUs to become journalists (Crawford, 2012)....

    [...]

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2022
TL;DR: The authors examines how journalism programs at historically black colleges and universities inform the future of majoritarian media programs, concluding that more people of color lack an interest in maintaining the status quo and can more effectively interrogate elected officials and investigate/report on institutional racism.
Abstract: This chapter examines how journalism programs at historically Black colleges and universities inform the future of majoritarian media programs. Only after a series of highly publicized cases of police abuse were caught on camera did many mainstream journalism schools reconsider whether students should be more skeptical of the official stories of police encounters with the public. Because more people of color lack an interest in maintaining the status quo, HBCU students can more effectively interrogate elected officials and investigate/report on institutional racism than journalism programs at primarily white mainstream universities. The chapter intersects with the George Floyd case and weaves through the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement on its way to wondering whether all future journalists who report on police would be better served being trained by outsiders.
References
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Book
01 Jan 1998
TL;DR: Theoretical Foundations and Practical Considerations for Getting Started and Techniques for Achieving Theoretical Integration are presented.
Abstract: Part I: Introduction to Grounded Theory of Anselm Strauss Chapter 1: Inspiration and Background Chapter 2: Theoretical Foundations Chapter 3: Practical Considerations for Getting Started Chapter 4: Prelude to Analysis Chapter 5: Strategies for Qualitative Data Analysis Chapter 6: Memos and Diagrams Chapter 7: Theoretical Sampling Chapter 8: Context Chapter 9: Process Chapter 10: Techniques for Achieving Theoretical Integration Chapter 11: The Use of Computer Programs in Qualitative Data Analysis Part II: Research Demonstration Project Chapter 12 Open Coding: Identifying Concepts Chapter 13: Developing Concepts in Terms of Their Properties and Dimensions Chapter 14: Analyzing Data for Context Chapter 15: Bringing Process Into the Analysis Chapter 16: Integrating Categories Part III: Finishing the Research Project Chapter 17: Writing Theses, Monographs, and Dissertations, and Giving Talks About Your Research Chapter 18: Criteria for Evaluation Chapter 19: Student Questions and Answers

33,113 citations

Book
01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present strategies for qualitative data analysis, including context, process and theoretical integration, and provide a criterion for evaluation of these strategies and answers to student questions and answers.
Abstract: Introduction -- Practical considerations -- Prelude to analysis -- Strategies for qualitative data analysis -- Introduction to context, process and theoretical integration -- Memos and diagrams -- Theoretical sampling -- Analyzing data for concepts -- Elaborating the analysis -- Analyzing data for context -- Bringing process into the analysis -- Integrating around a concept -- Writing theses, monographs, and giving talks -- Criterion for evaluation -- Student questions and answers to these.

31,251 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examine available theoretical models which have been derived from statistically established patterns of association between contextual and organizational variables, and argue that available models in fact attempt to explain organization at one remove by ignoring the essentially political process, whereby power-holders within organizations decide upon courses of strategic action.
Abstract: This paper critically examines available theoretical models which have been derived from statistically established patterns of association between contextual and organizational variables. These models offer an interpretation of organizational structure as a product of primarily economic constraints which contextual variables are assumed to impose. It is argued that available models in fact attempt to explain organization at one remove by ignoring the essentially political process, whereby power-holders within organizations decide upon courses of strategic action. This `strategic choice' typically includes not only the establishment of structural forms but also the manipulation of environmental features and the choice of relevant performance standards. A theoretical re-orientation of this kind away from functional imperatives and towards a recognition of political action is developed and illustrated in the main body of the paper.

4,758 citations

Book
01 Aug 1998
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a survey of case studies, case studies and qualitative data collected from the Internet and from participants' interviews with experts in the field of ethnography and grounded theory.
Abstract: Introduction Part one: Strategies Surveys Case studies Internet research Experiments Action research Ethnography Phenomenology Grounded theory Part two: Methods Questionnaires Interviews Observation Documents Part three: Analysis Quantitative data Qualitative data Writing up the research References Index.

4,213 citations