scispace - formally typeset
Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1080/02665433.2020.1728569

The community settlement: a neo-rural territorial tool

04 Mar 2021-Planning Perspectives (Routledge)-Vol. 36, Iss: 2, pp 237-257
Abstract: The Israeli Community Settlements are small-scale non-agricultural villages that consist of a limited number of families and a homogenous character. This method began to be used by the Israeli gove...

... read more

Citations
  More

9 results found


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1111/J.1468-0149.1965.TB02594.X

2,790 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1080/02665433.2021.1873172
Renato Leão Rego1Institutions (1)
Abstract: This paper explores how local culture may curb the homogenizing forces of globalization in the diffusion of planning ideas. Given that the built environment is constructed both physically and cultu...

... read more

Topics: Globalization (54%)

10 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1080/13602365.2020.1758952
Gabriel Schwake1Institutions (1)
Abstract: The UN Resolution 181 of 27 November 1947, which called for the establishment of a Jewish state in parts of Palestine, was one of the only votes backed by both the USSR and the USA. Both superpower...

... read more

Topics: Jewish state (59%)

10 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1080/13562576.2020.1788930
Gabriel Schwake1Institutions (1)
02 Jan 2021-Space and Polity
Abstract: The ‘Stars’ are series of suburban settlements adjacent to the border with the occupied West-Bank which illustrate the increasing privatisation of the Israeli settlement mechanism. Unlike earlier examples, which were dictated by pioneer ideology or individualistic attempts to achieve better living standards, during the 1990s the state adopted a supply-side territorial policy, which tried to ensure the continuation of its geopolitical project by securing the economic feasibility of the private sector. Analysing the development of the ‘Stars’, this paper sheds light on the privatisation and commodification of the Israeli settlement mechanism and with it the transformation of its spatial product.

... read more

Topics: Settlement (litigation) (51%), Private sector (51%)

6 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.POLGEO.2020.102223
Gabriel Schwake1Institutions (1)
Abstract: This paper focuses on Kochav-Yair and Oranit, two localities that exemplify the Israeli Suburban Settlement phenomenon. With the first being developed by a selective group of families and the latter by a single private entrepreneur, yet both with the full support of the state, they represent the selective privatisation of the national settlement project during the 1980s. Examining the geopolitical, social and economic interests that accompanied their development, this paper illustrates how both projects incorporated the upper-middle-class bourgeoisie in the national territorial effort along the border with the occupied West-Bank (the Green-Line). Analysing the planning and construction process of both case studies, as well as their spatial characteristics, this paper explains how the upwardly middle-class and its contractors were granted substantial planning rights. Consequently, enabling them to influence the production of space while promoting a new local suburban typology that is based on better living standards, private family life and a distinctive isolated community. Therefore, this paper illustrates the Suburban Settlement typology as an outcome of the bourgeoisification of the Green-Line, which domesticated the former frontier area and enabled its inclusion in the greater national consensus.

... read more

Topics: Settlement (litigation) (53%), Family life (52%), Middle class (50%)

4 Citations


References
  More

46 results found


Open accessBook
01 Jan 2005-
Abstract: Introduction 1 Freedom's Just Another Word 2 The Construction of Consent 3 The Neoliberal State 4 Uneven Geographical Developments 5 Neoliberalism with 'Chinese Characteristics' 6 Neoliberalism on Trial 7 Freedom's Prospect Notes Bibliography Index

... read more

10,058 Citations



Open accessBook
01 Jan 1976-
Abstract: Foreword by Lucy Lippard The Tourist in 2013 Introduction to the 1989 Edition Acknowledgments Introduction 1. Modernity and the Production of Touristic Experiences 2. Sightseeing and Social Structure 3. The Paris Case: Origins of Alienated Leisure 4. The Other Attractions 5. Staged Authenticity 6. A Semiotic of Attraction 7. The Ethnomethodology of Sightseers 8. Structure, Genuine and Spurious 9. On Theory, Methods, and Application Epilogue Notes Index

... read more

3,399 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1111/J.1468-0149.1965.TB02594.X

2,790 Citations


Open accessBook
01 Jan 2011-
Abstract: Every economics textbook says the same thing: Money was invented to replace onerous and complicated barter systems—to relieve ancient people from having to haul their goods to market. The problem with this version of history? There’s not a shred of evidence to support it. Here anthropologist David Graeber presents a stunning reversal of conventional wisdom. He shows that 5,000 years ago, during the beginning of the agrarian empires, humans have used elaborate credit systems. It is in this era, Graeber shows, that we also first encounter a society divided into debtors and creditors. With the passage of time, however, virtual credit money was replaced by gold and silver coins—and the system as a whole began to decline. Interest rates spiked and the indebted became slaves. And the system perpetuated itself with tremendously violent consequences, with only the rare intervention of kings and churches keeping the system from spiraling out of control. Debt: The First 5,000 Years is a fascinating chronicle of this little known history—as well as how it has defined human history, and what it means for the credit crisis of the present day and the future of our economy.

... read more

Topics: Credit crunch (55%), Debt (53%), Barter (53%) ... read more

1,439 Citations