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Journal ArticleDOI

The culture of control: crime and social order in contemporary, society

01 Jun 2003-Revista de Sociologia e Política (Revista de Sociologia e Política)-Iss: 20, pp 161-165
TL;DR: GARLAND, 2001, p. 2, the authors argues that a modernidade tardia, esse distintivo padrão de relações sociais, econômicas e culturais, trouxe consigo um conjunto de riscos, inseguranças, and problemas de controle social that deram uma configuração específica às nossas respostas ao crime, ao garantir os altos custos das
Abstract: Nos últimos trinta trinta anos, houve profundas mudanças na forma como compreendemos o crime e a justiça criminal. O crime tornou-se um evento simbólico, um verdadeiro teste para a ordem social e para as políticas governamentais, um desafio para a sociedade civil, para a democracia e para os direitos humanos. Segundo David Garland, professor da Faculdade de Direito da New York University, um dos principais autores no campo da Sociologia da Punição e com artigo publicado na Revista de Sociologia e Política , número 13, na modernidade tardia houve uma verdadeira obsessão securitária, direcionando as políticas criminais para um maior rigor em relação às penas e maior intolerância com o criminoso. Há trinta anos, nos EUA e na Inglaterra essa tendência era insuspeita. O livro mostra que os dois países compartilham intrigantes similaridades em suas práticas criminais, a despeito da divisão racial, das desigualdades econômicas e da letalidade violenta que marcam fortemente o cenário americano. Segundo David Garland, encontram-se nos dois países os “mesmos tipos de riscos e inseguranças, a mesma percepção a respeito dos problemas de um controle social não-efetivo, as mesmas críticas da justiça criminal tradicional, e as mesmas ansiedades recorrentes sobre mudança e ordem sociais”1 (GARLAND, 2001, p. 2). O argumento principal da obra é o seguinte: a modernidade tardia, esse distintivo padrão de relações sociais, econômicas e culturais, trouxe consigo um conjunto de riscos, inseguranças e problemas de controle social que deram uma configuração específica às nossas respostas ao crime, ao garantir os altos custos das políticas criminais, o grau máximo de duração das penas e a excessivas taxas de encarceramento.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper study penal inequality by estimating lifetime risks of imprisonment for black and white men at different levels of education and find that the risks of incarceration are highly stratified by education, with 30 percent of those without college education and nearly 60 percent of high school dropouts going to prison by 1999.
Abstract: Although growth in the U.S. prison population over the past twenty-five years has been widely discussed, few studies examine changes in inequality in imprisonment. We study penal inequality by estimating lifetime risks of imprisonment for black and white men at different levels of education. Combining administrative, survey, and census data, we estimate that among men born between 1965 and 1969, 3 percent of whites and 20 percent of blacks had served time in prison by their early thirties. The risks of incarceration are highly stratified by education. Among black men born during this period, 30 percent of those without college education and nearly 60 percent of high school dropouts went to prison by 1999. The novel pervasiveness of imprisonment indicates the emergence of incarceration as a new stage in the life course of young low-skill black men.

1,275 citations


Additional excerpts

  • ...Becky Pettit Bruce Western...

    [...]

BookDOI
01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: Part of the courts, criminal law, criminal procedure, criminology, Law and Society Commons, Law Enforcement and Corrections Commons, Legislation Commons, Politics and Social Change Commons, and the Race and Ethnicity Commons.
Abstract: How does access to this work benefit you? Let us know! Follow this and additional works at: http://academicworks.cuny.edu/jj_pubs Part of the Courts Commons, Criminal Law Commons, Criminal Procedure Commons, Criminology Commons, Judges Commons, Law and Politics Commons, Law and Society Commons, Law Enforcement and Corrections Commons, Legislation Commons, Politics and Social Change Commons, and the Race and Ethnicity Commons

916 citations


Cites background from "The culture of control: crime and s..."

  • ...It is somewhat more difficult to document quantitatively but has been vividly described in a number of historical accounts of this era of American corrections (e.g., Cullen, 1995; Garland, 2001; Gottschalk, 2006)....

    [...]

Book
27 Jun 2011
TL;DR: In this article, the Flatlands of Oakland and the Youth Control Complex are discussed. But the focus is on the role of black youth in the criminal justice system and community institutions.
Abstract: Preface Acknowledgments Part I Hypercriminalization 1 Dreams Deferred: The Patterns of Punishment in Oakland 2 The Flatlands of Oakland and the Youth Control Complex 3 The Labeling Hype: Coming of Age in the Era of Mass Incarceration 4 The Coupling of Criminal Justice and Community Institutions Part II Consequences 5 "Dummy Smart": Misrecognition, Acting Out, and "Going Dumb" 6 Proving Manhood: Masculinity as a Rehabilitative Tool 7 Guilty by Association: Acting White or Acting Lawful? Conclusion: Toward a Youth Support Complex Appendix: Beyond Jungle-Book Tropes Notes References Index About the Author

909 citations

Book
30 Jul 2007
TL;DR: The Watched World Today as discussed by the authors is a collection of articles about the surveillance of people in the world, including the following: 1. The Watched world today; 2. Spreading Surveillance Sites; 3. Explaining Surveillance; 4. Information, Identification, Inventory; 5. Security, Suspicion, Social Sorting; 6. Bodies, Borders, Biometrics; 7. Visibility; 8. Struggles over Surveillance; 9. Data, Discrimination, Dignity; 10.
Abstract: * Contents * Preface and Acknowledgments * Introduction * Part I Viewpoints *1. The Watched World Today *2. Spreading Surveillance Sites *3. Explaining Surveillance * Part II Vision *4. Information, Identification, Inventory *5. Security, Suspicion, Social Sorting *6. Bodies, Borders, Biometrics * Part III Visibility *7. Surveillance, Visibility and Popular Culture *8. Struggles over Surveillance *9. Data, Discrimination, Dignity * Glossary * Further Reading * Bibliography * Index

821 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In Punishing the Poor as mentioned in this paper, the authors show that the ascent of the penal state in the United States and other advanced societies over the past quarter-century is a response to rising social insecurity, not criminal insecurity; that changes in welfare and justice policies are interlinked, as restrictive "workfare" and expansive "prisonfare" are coupled into a single organizational contraption to discipline the precarious fractions of the postindustrial working class; and that a diligent carceral system is not a deviation from, but a constituent component of, the neoliberal Leviathan.
Abstract: In Punishing the Poor, I show that the ascent of the penal state in the United States and other advanced societies over the past quarter-century is a response to rising social insecurity, not criminal insecurity; that changes in welfare and justice policies are interlinked, as restrictive ‘‘workfare’’ and expansive ‘‘prisonfare’’ are coupled into a single organizational contraption to discipline the precarious fractions of the postindustrial working class; and that a diligent carceral system is not a deviation from, but a constituent component of, the neoliberal Leviathan. In this article, I draw out the theoretical implications of this diagnosis of the emerging government of social insecurity. I deploy Bourdieu’s concept of ‘‘bureaucratic field’’ to revise Piven and Cloward’s classic thesis on the regulation of poverty via public assistance, and contrast the model of penalization as technique for the management of urban marginality to Michel Foucault’s vision of the ‘‘disciplinary society,’’ David Garland’s account of the ‘‘culture of control,’’ and David Harvey’s characterization of neoliberal politics. Against the thin economic conception of neoliberalism as market rule, I propose a thick sociological specification entailing supervisory workfare, a proactive penal state, and the cultural trope of ‘‘individual responsibility.’’ This suggests that we must theorize the prison not as a technical implement for law enforcement, but as a core political capacity whose selective and aggressive deployment in the lower regions of social space violates the ideals of democratic citizenship.

549 citations

References
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper study penal inequality by estimating lifetime risks of imprisonment for black and white men at different levels of education and find that the risks of incarceration are highly stratified by education, with 30 percent of those without college education and nearly 60 percent of high school dropouts going to prison by 1999.
Abstract: Although growth in the U.S. prison population over the past twenty-five years has been widely discussed, few studies examine changes in inequality in imprisonment. We study penal inequality by estimating lifetime risks of imprisonment for black and white men at different levels of education. Combining administrative, survey, and census data, we estimate that among men born between 1965 and 1969, 3 percent of whites and 20 percent of blacks had served time in prison by their early thirties. The risks of incarceration are highly stratified by education. Among black men born during this period, 30 percent of those without college education and nearly 60 percent of high school dropouts went to prison by 1999. The novel pervasiveness of imprisonment indicates the emergence of incarceration as a new stage in the life course of young low-skill black men.

1,275 citations

BookDOI
01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: Part of the courts, criminal law, criminal procedure, criminology, Law and Society Commons, Law Enforcement and Corrections Commons, Legislation Commons, Politics and Social Change Commons, and the Race and Ethnicity Commons.
Abstract: How does access to this work benefit you? Let us know! Follow this and additional works at: http://academicworks.cuny.edu/jj_pubs Part of the Courts Commons, Criminal Law Commons, Criminal Procedure Commons, Criminology Commons, Judges Commons, Law and Politics Commons, Law and Society Commons, Law Enforcement and Corrections Commons, Legislation Commons, Politics and Social Change Commons, and the Race and Ethnicity Commons

916 citations

Book
27 Jun 2011
TL;DR: In this article, the Flatlands of Oakland and the Youth Control Complex are discussed. But the focus is on the role of black youth in the criminal justice system and community institutions.
Abstract: Preface Acknowledgments Part I Hypercriminalization 1 Dreams Deferred: The Patterns of Punishment in Oakland 2 The Flatlands of Oakland and the Youth Control Complex 3 The Labeling Hype: Coming of Age in the Era of Mass Incarceration 4 The Coupling of Criminal Justice and Community Institutions Part II Consequences 5 "Dummy Smart": Misrecognition, Acting Out, and "Going Dumb" 6 Proving Manhood: Masculinity as a Rehabilitative Tool 7 Guilty by Association: Acting White or Acting Lawful? Conclusion: Toward a Youth Support Complex Appendix: Beyond Jungle-Book Tropes Notes References Index About the Author

909 citations

Book
30 Jul 2007
TL;DR: The Watched World Today as discussed by the authors is a collection of articles about the surveillance of people in the world, including the following: 1. The Watched world today; 2. Spreading Surveillance Sites; 3. Explaining Surveillance; 4. Information, Identification, Inventory; 5. Security, Suspicion, Social Sorting; 6. Bodies, Borders, Biometrics; 7. Visibility; 8. Struggles over Surveillance; 9. Data, Discrimination, Dignity; 10.
Abstract: * Contents * Preface and Acknowledgments * Introduction * Part I Viewpoints *1. The Watched World Today *2. Spreading Surveillance Sites *3. Explaining Surveillance * Part II Vision *4. Information, Identification, Inventory *5. Security, Suspicion, Social Sorting *6. Bodies, Borders, Biometrics * Part III Visibility *7. Surveillance, Visibility and Popular Culture *8. Struggles over Surveillance *9. Data, Discrimination, Dignity * Glossary * Further Reading * Bibliography * Index

821 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

668 citations


Additional excerpts

  • ...François Ewald (1991) já havia sugerido que, na sociedade contemporânea, não seria mais a situação de indagar sobre os efeitos da sanção penal mas sim de o dispor das novas formas de prevenção e de minimização dos riscos....

    [...]