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Book ChapterDOI

The Digital Future for Museums

01 Jan 2019-pp 551-577
TL;DR: This chapter discusses possible directions that museums could take with respect to the rapidly developing digital culture in which they find themselves and speculate how museums could adapt to survive in the digital environment that is increasingly integrated as part of the real environment.
Abstract: We discuss possible directions that museums could take with respect to the rapidly developing digital culture in which they find themselves. Successful museums must be very adaptable to the changing nature of public expectations. Some of the important aspects to be considered have been covered in earlier chapters in this book. Here we take this knowledge and speculate how museums could adapt to survive in the digital environment that is increasingly integrated as part of the real environment, in what will rapidly become a postdigital world. The chapter summarizes the prospective directions for museums and related institutions in the context of changes in the digital landscape of the rest of society.
Citations
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
08 Jul 2019
TL;DR: This half-day Symposium explores themes of digital art, culture, and heritage, bringing together speakers from a range of disciplines to consider technology with respect to artistic and academic practice.
Abstract: This half-day Symposium explores themes of digital art, culture, and heritage, bringing together speakers from a range of disciplines to consider technology with respect to artistic and academic practice. As we increasingly see ourselves and life through a digital lens and the world communicated on digital screens, we experience altered states of being and consciousness in ways that blur the lines between digital and physical reality, while our ways of thinking and seeing become a digital stream of consciousness that flows between place and cyberspace. We have entered the postdigital world and are living, working, and thinking with machines as our computational culture driven by artificial intelligence and machine learning embeds itself in everyday life and threads across art, culture, and heritage, juxtaposing them in the digital profusion of human creativity on the Internet.

3 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , the authors investigated 1,790 comments posted on Facebook from January to June 2021 by visitors of the Romanian museums to find the emotional responses regarding their experiences, and the EViews software was used to produce images regarding the relationships between emotions and sentiments.
Abstract: Romanian museums have a rich cultural heritage that is intrinsically valuable to its citizens, however, the number of visitors has been decreasing in recent years as individuals prefer to visit more dynamic and more effectively promoted tourism and cultural establishments. An interactive presence on social media can switch the attention of different cohorts as well as provide a space where people feel free to express their feelings and opinions and thus could also influence the decisions of others in regards to visiting these cultural heritage establishments. This article investigates 1,790 comments posted on Facebook from January to June 2021 by visitors of the Romanian museums to find the emotional responses regarding their experiences. R software delivered the text mining results, sentiment scores, and emotion classifications. In addition, the EViews software was used to produce images regarding the relationships between emotions and sentiments. As a result, we have found that the visitors expressed favorable emotional responses to the Romanian museums’ activities.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
15 Feb 2023-Heritage
TL;DR: In this new cultural landscape, museums are responding to human digital identity in a tidal wave of human interactions on the Internet, from social media to online sharing of images and videos, revealing shared perspectives on cultural conflict as being tied to freedom of expression of one's heritage embedded in digital identity as discussed by the authors .
Abstract: This paper looks at key elements of global culture that are driving a new paradigm shift in museums causing them to question their raison d’être, their design and physical space, recognizing the need to accommodate visitor interaction and participation, and to reprioritize institutional outcomes and goals reexamining their priorities. As heritage sharing in online spaces reaches across national, political, and social boundaries on platforms and networks, this has been driven by museum engagement with Internet life during the pandemic. Museum relationships and interactions with communities both local and global continue to challenge core values and precepts, leading to radical changes in how museums define their roles and responsibilities. In this new cultural landscape, museums are responding to human digital identity in a tidal wave of human interactions on the Internet, from social media to online sharing of images and videos. This is revealing shared perspectives on cultural conflict as being tied to freedom of expression of one’s heritage embedded in digital identity.

1 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
08 Jun 2023
TL;DR: Wang et al. as discussed by the authors proposed a fast collection type recognition method based on fuzzy logic and machine learning model, which can further improve the recognition accuracy of electronic instrument collections, and can well serve the museum exhibition design.
Abstract: The role of museums in science popularization is receiving unprecedented attention. Among them, the Electronic Science and Technology Museum has recorded the history of the electronic industry. When designing the exhibition of the Electronic Science and Technology Museum, the classification and deployment of collection types are very important. However, most of the existing classification methods of museum collection types rely on simple physical information, such as the production time and composition of the collection, and lack scientific identification and classification methods for electronic instrument collections of the same era and technology. In this paper, we propose a fast collection type recognition method based on fuzzy logic and machine learning model. First, we use fuzzy logic to expand the attribute dimension of the collection and enrich the attribute information of the collection. Subsequently, we use the Adaboost model to realize rapid recognition of collection types. Using the determined type of collection information to train the Adaboost model, so that it can quickly and efficiently identify the unified type of collection. The simulation results show that the proposed method can further improve the recognition accuracy of electronic instrument collections, and can well serve the museum exhibition design.
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , practitioners and interdisciplinary theorists discussed the concept of "Anthropocenic objects" and considered how they create opportunities for the emergence of new collecting practices involving participatory research and open exchange between research, society, and conservation institutions.
Abstract: The knowledge needed to tackle future environmental and societal challenges can only be generated through exchange between science and society. The conventional distinction made between natural and cultural heritage in museums and other institutions is no longer appropriate in the Anthropocene. Museums must rethink the social and cultural dimensions of existing museum collections and reinvent the organization of knowledge production for our present. In three workshops at the Museum für Naturkunde Berlin, practitioners and interdisciplinary theorists discussed the concept of “Anthropocenic objects” and considered how they create opportunities for the emergence of new collecting practices involving participatory research and open exchange between research, society, and conservation institutions.
References
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Book
01 Jan 1995
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors decoded the mysteries and debunks the hype surrounding bandwidth, multimedia, virtual reality, and the Internet, and suggested what being digital will mean for our laws, education, politics, and amusements -in short, for the way we live.
Abstract: From the Publisher: Being Digital decodes the mysteries and debunks the hype surrounding bandwidth, multimedia, virtual reality, and the Internet. It forecasts technologies that will make your telephone as context-sensitive as an English butler and replace TV broadcasters with intelligent "broadcatchers" that assemble and deliver only the programming you want. And this book suggests what being digital will mean for our laws, education, politics, and amusements - in short, for the way we live.

2,792 citations

Book
03 Jul 2014
TL;DR: In this paper, Bostrom's work picks its way carefully through a vast tract of forbiddingly difficult intellectual terrain, and the writing is so lucid that it somehow makes it all seem easy.
Abstract: The human brain has some capabilities that the brains of other animals lack. It is to these distinctive capabilities that our species owes its dominant position. Other animals have stronger muscles or sharper claws, but we have cleverer brains. If machine brains one day come to surpass human brains in general intelligence, then this new superintelligence could become very powerful. As the fate of the gorillas now depends more on us humans than on the gorillas themselves, so the fate of our species then would come to depend on the actions of the machine superintelligence. But we have one advantage: we get to make the first move. Will it be possible to construct a seed AI or otherwise to engineer initial conditions so as to make an intelligence explosion survivable? How could one achieve a controlled detonation? To get closer to an answer to this question, we must make our way through a fascinating landscape of topics and considerations. Read the book and learn about oracles, genies, singletons; about boxing methods, tripwires, and mind crime; about humanity's cosmic endowment and differential technological development; indirect normativity, instrumental convergence, whole brain emulation and technology couplings; Malthusian economics and dystopian evolution; artificial intelligence, and biological cognitive enhancement, and collective intelligence. This profoundly ambitious and original book picks its way carefully through a vast tract of forbiddingly difficult intellectual terrain. Yet the writing is so lucid that it somehow makes it all seem easy. After an utterly engrossing journey that takes us to the frontiers of thinking about the human condition and the future of intelligent life, we find in Nick Bostrom's work nothing less than a reconceptualization of the essential task of our time.

907 citations

Book
01 Jan 1968
TL;DR: McLuhan and Powers as discussed by the authors argue that with the advent of the "global village" - as a result of electronic communications - these two mind sets are "slamming into each other at the speed of light".
Abstract: This is Marshall McLuhan's last book, written in collaboration with his longtime friend, Bruce Powers It updates McLuhan's landmark study, Understanding Media, which was published 25 years agoll The premise is the distinction between what McLuhan and Powers call Visual Space - or the left-brain, linear, quantitative reasoning tradition of the West beginning with Plato and Aristotle - as against what they call Acoustic Space - right-brain, qualitative, pattern-producing reasoning, the holistic approach of the East They argue that with the advent of the "global village" - as a result of electronic communications - these two mind sets are "slamming into each other at the speed of light" In their words, "In the last half of the 20th century the East will rush westward and the West will embrace orientalism, all in a desperate attempt to cope with each other, to avoid violence But the key to peace is to understand both these systems simultaneously"

585 citations

Book
01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: This chapter discusses the evolution of knowledge and the role of ideology in the development of knowledge.
Abstract: PART I: CHANGE CHAPTER 1: THE GRAND BARGAIN CHAPTER 2: FROM THE VANGUARD CHAPTER 3: PATTERNS ACROSS THE PROFESSIONS PART II: THEORY CHAPTER 4: INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY CHAPTER 5: PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION OF KNOWLEDGE PART III - IMPLICATIONS CHAPTER 6: OBJECTIONS AND ANXIETIES CHAPTER 7: AFTER THE PROFESSIONS CONCLUSION WHAT FUTURE SHOULD WE WANT?

320 citations

Book
01 Jan 2013
TL;DR: The New Digital Age as discussed by the authors is an unparalleled collaboration of two leading global thinkers in technology and foreign affairs giving us their widely anticipated, transformational vision of the future: a world where everyone is connecteda world full of challenges and benefits that are ours to meet and to harness.
Abstract: In an unparalleled collaboration, two leading global thinkers in technology and foreign affairs give us their widely anticipated, transformational vision of the future: a world where everyone is connecteda world full of challenges and benefits that are ours to meet and to harness. Eric Schmidt is one of Silicon Valleys great leaders, having taken Google from a small startup to one of the worlds most influential companies. Jared Cohen is the director of Google Ideas and a former adviser to secretaries of state Condoleezza Rice and Hillary Clinton. With their combined knowledge and experiences, the authors are uniquely positioned to take on some of the toughest questions about our future: Who will be more powerful in the future, the citizen or the state? Will technology make terrorism easier or harder to carry out? What is the relationship between privacy and security, and how much will we have to give up to be part of the new digital age? In this groundbreaking book, Schmidt and Cohen combine observation and insight to outline the promise and peril awaiting us in the coming decades. At once pragmatic and inspirational, this is a forward-thinking account of where our world is headed and what this means for people, states and businesses. With the confidence and clarity of visionaries, Schmidt and Cohen illustrate just how much we have to look forward toand beware ofas the greatest information and technology revolution in human history continues to evolve. On individual, community and state levels, across every geographical and socioeconomic spectrum, they reveal the dramatic developmentsgood and badthat will transform both our everyday lives and our understanding of self and society, as technology advances and our virtual identities become more and more fundamentally real. As Schmidt and Cohens nuanced vision of the near future unfolds, an urban professional takes his driverless car to work, attends meetings via hologram and dispenses housekeeping robots by voice; a Congolese fisherwoman uses her smart phone to monitor market demand and coordinate sales (saving on costly refrigeration and preventing overfishing); the potential arises for virtual statehood and Internet asylum to liberate political dissidents and oppressed minorities, but also for tech-savvy autocracies (and perhaps democracies) to exploit their citizens mobile devices for ever more ubiquitous surveillance. Along the way, we meet a cadre of international figuresincluding Julian Assangewho explain their own visions of our technology-saturated future. Inspiring, provocative and absorbing, The New Digital Age is a brilliant analysis of how our hyper-connected world will soon look, from two of our most prescient and informed public thinkers.

270 citations