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MonographDOI

The Dutch Language in Japan (1600-1900): A Cultural and Sociolinguistic Study of Dutch as a Contact Language in Tokugawa and Meiji Japan

01 Jan 2021-
About: The article was published on 2021-01-01. It has received 4 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Sociolinguistics & Asian studies.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors introduced the manuscript witnesses of Yoshio Gonnosuke's hitherto unstudied comparative Dutch-Japanese syntax written in the mid-1820s, which was modelled on Pieter Weiland's Nederduitsche spraakkunst (1805).
Abstract: After outlining the life and works of interpreter Yoshio Gonnosuke, this paper introduces the manuscript witnesses of his hitherto unstudied comparative Dutch–Japanese syntax written in the mid‐1820s, which was modelled on Pieter Weiland's Nederduitsche spraakkunst (1805). This is followed by a closer look at the process of compilation and publication of Philipp Franz von Siebold's “Epitome linguae japonicae,” of which only the first part was published in 1826. Evidence is provided to confirm Yoshio's involvement in this work and to suggest that Yoshio's syntax was in fact intended to form the core of its unpublished second part.
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BookDOI
01 Dec 1971
TL;DR: The Prose of the World: I The Four Similitudes, II Signatures, III The Limits of the world, IV the Writing of Things, V The Being of Language 3.Representing: I Don Quixote, II Order, III Representation of the Sign, IV Duplicated Representation, V Imagination of Resemblance, VI Mathesis and 'Taxinoma' 4. Speaking: I Criticism and Commentary, II General Grammar,III The Theory of the Verb, IV Articulation, V Designation, VI Derivation,
Abstract: Publishers Note, Forward to the English Edition, Preface Part I: 1.Las Meninas 2.The Prose of the World: I The Four Similitudes, II Signatures, III The Limits of the World, IV the Writing of Things, V The Being of Language 3.Representing: I Don Quixote, II Order, III The Representation of the Sign, IV Duplicated Representation, V The Imagination of Resemblance, VI Mathesis and 'Taxinoma' 4. Speaking: I Criticism and Commentary, II General Grammar, III The Theory of the Verb, IV Articulation, V Designation, VI Derivation, VII The Quadrilateral Language 5. Classifying: I What the Historians say, II Natural History, III Structure, IV Character, V Continuity and Catastrophe, VI Monsters and Fossils, VII The Discourse of Nature 6. Exchanging: I The Analysis of wealth, II Money and Prices, III Mercantilism, IV The Pledge and the Price, V The Creation of Value, VI Utility, VII General Table, VIII Desire and Representation Part 2 7. The Limits of Representation: I The Age of History, II The Measure of Labour, III The Organic Structure of Beings, IV Word Inflection, V Ideology and Criticism, VI Objective Synthesis 8. Labour, life, Language: I The New Empiricities, II Ricardo, III Cuvier, IV Bopp, V Language Became Object 9. Man and His Doubles: I The return of Language, II The Place of the King, III The Analytic of Finitude, IV The Empirical and the Transcendental, V The 'Cogito' and the Unthought, VI The Retreat and the Return of the Origin, VII Discourse and Man's Being, VIII The Anthropological Sleep 10. The Human Sciences: I The Three Faces of Knowledge, II The Form of the Human Sciences, III The Three Models, IV History, V Psychoanalysis and Ethnology, VI In Conclusion

7,353 citations

Book
01 Jan 1966
TL;DR: This article studied the social stratification of English in New York City department stores and the isolation of contextual style in the context of the lower east side of Manhattan, and the structure of the New York city vowel system.
Abstract: Part I. Problems and Methods of Analysis: 1. The study of language in its social context 2. First approach to the structure of New York City English 3. The social stratification of English in New York City department stores 4. The isolation of contextual style 5. The linguistic interview 6. The survey of the lower east side Part II. Social Differentiation: 7. Class differentiation of the variables 8. Further analysis of the variables 9. Distribution of the variables in apparent time 10. Other linguistic variables Part III. Social Evaluation: 11. Subjective evaluation of the variables 12. Self-evaluation and linguistic security 13. General attitudes towards the speech of New York City Part IV. Synthesis: 14. The structure of the New York City vowel system.

2,837 citations

Book
01 Jan 1999
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a map-preface abbreviations for maps and a bibliography index for bibliographies of the maps. But they do not discuss the relation between the map and the bibliography.
Abstract: Maps Preface Abbreviations 1. Introduction 2. Genetic affiliation 3. Historical development 4. Dialects 5. Lexicon 6. Writing systems 7. Sound patterns 8. Word structure 9. Grammatical structure Select bibliography Index.

913 citations

Book
30 Aug 1985
TL;DR: In this article, the authors re-examine such concepts as 'a language', 'correct usage', 'race' and 'ethnic groups' and clearly reveal the complex role of language in establishing relationships within regional and social communities and at the state or national level.
Abstract: With every speech act all individuals perform, to a greater or less extent, an 'act of identity', revealing through their personal use of language their sense of social and ethnic solidarity or difference. Yet at the same time people also have powerful (if unconscious) stereotypes about the norms and standards of their own language and those of others - often at variance with observable behaviour. The view of language use proposed here derives from the authors' extensive fieldwork in the Creole-speaking Caribbean and among West Indian communities in London, and is forcefully illustrated by the data they present, which include recorded conversations and stories. The authors re-examine such concepts as 'a language', 'correct usage', 'race' and 'ethnic groups' and clearly reveal the complex role of language in establishing relationships within regional and social communities and at the state or national level.

910 citations

Book
01 Jan 1993
TL;DR: The use of two or more linguistic varieties in the same conversation is referred to as codedwitching as discussed by the authors, which is a type of skilled performance, not as the "alternative strategy" of a person who cannot carry on a conversation in the language in which it began.
Abstract: Codeswitching may be broadly defined as the use of two or more linguistic varieties in the same conversation. Using data from multilingual African context, Carol Myers-Scotton advances a theoretical argument which aims at a general explanation of the motivations underlying the phenomenon. She treats codeswitching as a type of skilled performance, not as the 'alternative strategy' of a person who cannot carry on a conversation in the language in which it began. Speakers exploit the socio=psychological values associated with different linguistic varieties in a particular speech community: by switching codes speakers negotiate a change in social distance between themselves and other participants in a conversation. Switching between languages has much in common with making stylistic choices within the same language: it is as if bilingual and multilingual speakers have an additional style at their command when they engage in codeswitching. _

769 citations