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Journal ArticleDOI

The Eastern Establishment and the Western Experience: The West of Frederick Remington, Theodore Roosevelt, and Owen Wister.

01 Jan 1969-American Literature-Vol. 40, Iss: 4, pp 561
TL;DR: Remington, Wister, and Wister as mentioned in this paper described the formation of an Eastern Establishment and the Western Experience, 1835-1885, and the Rough Riders: Regiment of True Americans.
Abstract: Preface Preface to the Paperback Edition Introduction Part I: The East 1. The Formation of an Eastern Establishment 2. Easterners and the Western Experience, 1835-1885 3. Remington, Roosevelt, Wister: The East and Adolescence Part II: The West 4. Roosevelt's West: The Beat of Hardy Life 5. Remington's West: Men with the Bark On 6. Wister's West: The Cowboy as Cultural Hero Part III: East and West in the Decade of Consensus 7. The Rough Riders: Regiment of True Americans 8. Technocracy and Arcadia: Conservation under Roosevelt 9. Remington, Roosevelt, Wister: Consensus and the West References Index
Citations
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Dissertation
01 Jan 1997
TL;DR: In this paper, the historic role of sportsmen in preserving Yellowstone National Park's wildlife and in establishing protective legislation and effective management of park resources was examined, showing that sportsmen had a wider vision of conservation than generally given credit by historians.
Abstract: This thesis examines the historic role of sportsmen in preserving Yellowstone National Park's wildlife and in establishing protective legislation and effective management of park resources. Although Yellowstone had initially been established in 1872 to protect the region's geologic features, over the decades of the 1880s and 1890s, sportsmen helped expand the goals of preservation to include wildlife, watersheds, and forests. Using primary source documents such as Forest and Stream magazine and archival records of Yellowstone National Park, this study demonstrates that sportsmen had a wider vision of conservation than generally given credit by historians and had a critical impact on changing management policies in Yellowstone National Park and the surrounding national forests. SPORTSMEN AND THE EVOLUTION OF THE CONSERVATION IDEA IN YELLOWSTONE: 1882-1894 by Sarah Ellen Broadbent A thesis1 submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degpee ■of Master' of Arts in History Montana State University Bozeman, Montana April 1997

7 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Spanish-American War was a key moment in the development of U.S. imperialism and the popular western as discussed by the authors and its iconic figure was Roosevelt's rough rider who yoked frontier heroism to overseas militarism, in the process justifying American extra-continental expansionism and extending the ideological reach of the western.
Abstract: The Spanish-American War was a key moment in the development of U.S. imperialism and the popular western. Its iconic figure was Roosevelt's rough rider—the Anglo-Saxon gentleman cowboy par excellence—who yoked frontier heroism to overseas militarism, in the process justifying American extra-continental expansionism and extending the ideological reach of the western. The black military presence in Cuba—and, subsequently, Puerto Rico and the Philippines—threatened that process by challenging white superiority on the western frontier and the imperial battlefield. When white myth makers suppressed this story of black heroism, they drove it deep into the western's creative fabric. By following the fortunes of black soldiers, in print and in society, we can recognize how deeply the western formula is motivated and shaped by the blackness it denies and to what different ends African-American writers yoked western adventure, military action, and meanings of manhood in the United States.

7 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In his seminal work Virgin Land (1950), Henry Nash Smith depicted the bymbolic meaning that Americans attached to their Western empire during the nineteenth century as mentioned in this paper, and a certain squeamishness pervaded the attitudes of many upper-class Easterners to Western society itself.
Abstract: In his seminal work Virgin Land (1950), Henry Nash Smith depicted the bymbolic meaning that Americans attached to their Western empire during the nineteenth century. The West appealed to the American imagination variously as a possible passage to India, a land to be filled, farmed and civilized and a land to lend territorial grandeur to the existing American nation. But a certain squeamishness pervaded the attitudes of many upper-class Easterners to Western society itself, and only towards die end of the nineteenth century did they begin to show a marked enthusiasm for life in the West, and for their own pioneering origins.

6 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the late nineteenth century, America displayed a new imperialistic mood and a heightened desire to impress her independence upon Europe when she embarked upon a number of military adventures in the Caribbean and Pacific as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: In the late nineteenth century, America displayed a new imperialistic mood and a heightened desire to impress her independence upon Europe when she embarked upon a number of military adventures in the Caribbean and Pacific. During the same period, there appeared a new popular hero — the "Rough Rider" — who derived from the Western frontier but expanded the field of heroic action well beyond the shores of America. The creation of this hero and the scene in which he was set demonstrates how popular culture of the period not only embodied but facilitated crucial developments in the nation's growth. The process of creation also shows how commercial agencies — popular circuses, yellow newspapers, mass magazines — became prime movers in the formation of America's interna- tional image.

6 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Pattullo boys as mentioned in this paper were born in Woodstock, Ontario, in • 873 and • 879, respectively, and their younger brother was named after their father, who was an important influence on their early lives.
Abstract: United States. Their frontier experiences were a major influence on their later lives, particularly on their political ideas. By the 193os they had moved to opposite ends of the political spectrum within two increasingly divergent federal systems. Duff and George grew up amid politics and discussion of politics. They were born in Woodstock, Ontario, in • 873 and • 879, respectively. The younger brother was named after their father, who was an important influence on their early lives. George Pattullo, senior, was a prominent Liberal party organizer, and so from the cradle the Pattullo boys were nurtured in late nineteenth-century Canadian Liberalism. A portrait of Wilfrid Laurier, who Duff and George later agreed was the greatest Canadian who had ever lived, hung in the family living room. Prominent Liberals of the day, from both the federal and provincial cabinets, were frequent guests in the Pattullo home. The Pattullos were acquainted with another Liberal family living in nearby Berlin whose eldest son, a year younger than Duff, was named William Lyon Mackenzie King. As the editor of a Liberal newspaper and the chief party bagman in Oxford County, Pattullo senior was most closely

5 citations

References
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01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: In the early 1960s, the John Birch Society, a staunchly anticommunist organization founded in 1958 by retired businessman Robert H.W. Welch, became a hotbed of anti-communism in Southern California as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: OF DISSERTATION SAVE OUR REPUBLIC: BATTLING JOHN BIRCH IN CALIFORNIA’S CONSERVATIVE CRADLE Previous accounts of the development of the New American Right have demonstrated the popularity and resonance of the ideology in Southern California. However, these studies have not shown how contention surrounded conservatism’s ascendancy even in regions where it found eager disciples. “Save Our Republic” uses one conservative Southern California community as a vehicle to better understand the foundations of a wider movement and argues the growth of conservatism was not nearly as smooth as earlier studies have suggested. Santa Barbara, California, experienced a much more contentious introduction to the same conservative elements and exemplifies the larger ideological clash that occurred nationwide during the late 1950s and early 1960s between “establishment,” moderate Republicans and the party’s right flank. In California’s cradle of conservatism, the ideology’s birth was not an easy one. Santa Barbara should have provided a bonanza of support for the John Birch Society, a staunchly anticommunist organization founded in 1958 by retired businessman Robert H.W. Welch. Instead, its presence there in the early 1960s divided the city and inspired the sort of suspicion that ultimately hobbled the group’s reputation nationally. Rather than thriving in the city, the JBS impaled itself in a series of self-inflicted wounds that only worsened the effect these characterizations had on the group’s national reputation. Disseminated to a nationwide audience by local newspaper publisher Thomas M. Storke, who declared his intention to banish the organization from the city, the events that occurred in Santa Barbara throughout 1961 alerted other cities of the potential disruption the JBS could inspire in their communities. The JBS would forever bear the battle scars it earned in Santa Barbara. “Save Our Republic” argues the events in Santa Barbara exemplify the more pronounced political battle that was occurring throughout the nation in the 1960s as conservatives grappled to determine the bounds of their ideology. The threat from the right that caused so much handwringing in the halls of conservative power had an equally unsettling effect in the city’s parlors, churches, schoolhouses and newsrooms.

84 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the relative importance of material and ideal factors for social action in philosophy and social theory has been discussed, and the importance of idealism in both actor-oriented (that is, phenomenologist, ethnomethodologist, symbolic interactionist) and structure-oriented theorists has been examined.
Abstract: Perhaps the most vexing problem in philosophy and social theory concerns the relative importance of material and ideal factors for social action. Karl Marx, for instance, with his notion of base and superstructure and his materialistic interpretation of the dialectic process, made a clean break from the idealism of his Hegelian heritage (McLellan 1977:390; Swingewood 1991:62–63). Nevertheless, idealism proved resilient and later came to inform the thinking of both actor-oriented (that is, phenomenologist, ethnomethodologist, symbolic interactionist) and structure-oriented (that is Functionalist, Structuralist) theorists.

65 citations

Book ChapterDOI
31 Dec 2019
TL;DR: Turner as mentioned in this paper was the most eminent historian of his generation, who delivered an academic paper at the historical congress convened in conjunction with the Columbian Exposition, which celebrated the four hundredth anniversary of Columbus's arrival in the Western Hemisphere.
Abstract: Americans have never had much use for history, but we do like anniversaries. In 1893 Frederick Jackson Turner, who would become the most eminent historian of his generation, was in Chicago to deliver an academic paper at the historical congress convened in conjunction with the Columbian Exposition. The occasion for the exposition was a slightly belated celebration of the four hundredth anniversary of Columbus's arrival in the Western Hemisphere. The paper Turner presented was "The Significance of the Frontier in American History." 1

34 citations

DOI
01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: The authors identify a genre of travel writing that they refer to as frontier revival literature, which is particularly important in negotiating North American ideas of imperialism, nationality, citizenship, gender, and race from 1880-1930.
Abstract: In this dissertation, I identify a genre of travel writing that I refer to as frontier revival literature, which I show to be particularly important in negotiating North American ideas of imperialism, nationality, citizenship, gender, and race from 1880-1930. Meaning about cultural identity emerges through motifs of physical movement in frontier revival literature. I focus on how female frontier revival authors appropriate familiar motifs of frontier revival literature to promote women’s rights. Frontier revival literature consists of tourist accounts of travel in western Canada by Canadian and American authors who published in northeastern American cities and who wrote for a largely eastern, urban audience. I show how male frontier revival literature authors use American manifest destiny rhetoric in a western Canadian setting to promote ideas of an intercontinental west that, despite seeming to broadly represent North American progress, are highly gendered and racialized. I combine and adapt elements of feminist and conceptual metaphor theory as a way of reading how women writers of the frontier revival debate such ideas through representations of physical movement. I build on a diverse range of feminist theory to examine how images of the travelling female body negotiate and often contest dominant ideological messages about cultural identity in travel literature by men. I develop conceptual metaphor theory in order to identify a network of metaphors that I see as emerging in frontier revival literature. Focussing on three different chronological stages of frontier revival literature, I apply my methodology in comparative close readings of the following texts by Canadian and American authors: Sara Jeannette Duncan’s A Social Departure: How Orthodocia and I Went Around the

29 citations