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Journal ArticleDOI

The Eastern Establishment and the Western Experience: The West of Frederick Remington, Theodore Roosevelt, and Owen Wister.

01 Jan 1969-American Literature-Vol. 40, Iss: 4, pp 561
TL;DR: Remington, Wister, and Wister as mentioned in this paper described the formation of an Eastern Establishment and the Western Experience, 1835-1885, and the Rough Riders: Regiment of True Americans.
Abstract: Preface Preface to the Paperback Edition Introduction Part I: The East 1. The Formation of an Eastern Establishment 2. Easterners and the Western Experience, 1835-1885 3. Remington, Roosevelt, Wister: The East and Adolescence Part II: The West 4. Roosevelt's West: The Beat of Hardy Life 5. Remington's West: Men with the Bark On 6. Wister's West: The Cowboy as Cultural Hero Part III: East and West in the Decade of Consensus 7. The Rough Riders: Regiment of True Americans 8. Technocracy and Arcadia: Conservation under Roosevelt 9. Remington, Roosevelt, Wister: Consensus and the West References Index
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2017
TL;DR: Turner's Deutung as discussed by the authors is in den vergangenen Jahrzehnten ein neues Bild des Westens entstanden als eines dynamischen, multikulturellen Eldorados, in dem sich von Beginn an die Schicksale der Ureinwohner, Hispano-amerikaner, Euroamerikaners, Afroameramaner, and Asiaten kreuzten und das von wechselhaften Verbindungen zwischen Menschen
Abstract: Die Frontier als Siedlungsgrenze und Fortschrittshorizont, die es bestandig vorwarts zu treiben und deren Herausforderungen es immer wieder zu bewaltigen gilt, pragt die nationale Identitat Amerikas wie kaum ein anderes Grundmotiv. Auf den Begriff gebracht wurde diese Idee Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts von dem Historiker Frederick Jackson Turner. Seither ist vielfach auf die blinden Flecken und problematischen Verkurzungen in Turners Deutung hingewiesen worden. Aus dieser Kritik ist in den vergangenen Jahrzehnten ein neues Bild des Westens entstanden als eines dynamischen, multikulturellen Eldorados, in dem sich von Beginn an die Schicksale der Ureinwohner, Hispanoamerikaner, Euroamerikaner, Afroamerikaner und Asiaten kreuzten und das von wechselhaften Verbindungen zwischen Menschen und Kapital, ihrer Einbindung in den Weltmarkt und den daraus resultierenden Konsequenzen fur Natur und Gesellschaft gepragt wurde und wird.

3 citations

Book
01 Jan 2007

2 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2011
TL;DR: The possibility of a reconciliation of civilization and savagery crystallized into a major preoccupation both of writers of frontier drama and of other artists and intellectuals who pondered the frontier experience as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: The opposition of savagery and civilization functioned significantly as a way of distinguishing characters from each other and motivating plot development even in early frontier drama. To be sure, the shape of the action in early-nineteenth-century plays like Metamora (1829) and The Lion of the West (1830) depended heavily on the civilization-savagery contrast. Later frontier plays, like My Partner (1879), had even begun to explore the possibility of bridging this opposition by bringing together in marriage at play’s end the characters representing civilization and savagery, East and West, respectively. As the nineteenth century gave way to the twentieth century, however, the possibility of a reconciliation of civilization and savagery crystallized into a major preoccupation both of writers of frontier drama and of other artists and intellectuals who pondered the frontier experience. This turn-of-the-century frontier western discourse to which Turner, Roosevelt, Wister, and Remington were key contributors provides a context within which the frontier visions presented in plays like Clyde Fitch’s The Cowboy and the Lady (1899), Augustus Thomas’s Arizona (1900), Frederic Remington and Louis Evan Shipman’s John Ermine of the Yellowstone (1903), and Owen Wister and Kirke La Shelle’s The Virginian (1904) can be profitably analyzed.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article argued that Hidalgo is better understood as part of the revival of spectacular epic cinema at the turn of the millennium, appearing alongside a number of epic films that explored a clash of cultures through mythic-historic narratives.
Abstract: in recent years, several scholarly works (e.g., Broughton; Johnson et al.; Mitchell) have revisited one of the oldest genres in film history—the Western—to examine its lasting appeal and its ability to reinvent itself through hybridization with other genres. However, when genre hybridization is considered, research often focuses on so-called weird hybrids1 (see Green; Johnson et al.) or “darker” varieties such as noir and crime fiction crossovers (e.g., Mitchell or Monticone). Joe Johnston’s Hidalgo (2004) is unusual in this context, and its ambiguous reception at the time of its release highlights some of the problems that arise when genre conventions are taken too much at face value. A closer analysis of the film, therefore, might demonstrate the value of looking beyond obvious genre tropes toward wider cinematic trends. While Hidalgo was largely dismissed by critics reading it as a Western, I will argue that the film is better understood as part of the revival of spectacular epic cinema at the turn of the millennium, appearing alongside a number of epic films that explored, broadly speaking, a clash of cultures through mythic-historic narratives.2 As such, the film adds another dimension to current debates about the Western, as Hidalgo’s nostalgic-ironic reframing of traditional Western tropes together with elements of the epic and the adventure film offers a contemporary mash-up of myths that reflects the global audiences at which it is aimed. As Johnson et al. note, “one of the distinctive features of the western” is perhaps that it can “form unexpected combinations with other genres,” creating odd resonances between those genres (2). Through its playful engagement with the Western, Hidalgo not only offers a novel hybrid and an entertaining spectacle; its self-conscious play with generic conventions also can help us to critically assess the Western’s most iconic features. Hidalgo portrays the journey of rundown Western rider Frank T. Hopkins (Viggo Mortensen) and his mustang Hidalgo, who participate in a spectacular race across the Arabian Desert. Yet it is also a journey of self-discovery that highlights contemporary concerns about identity, ethnicity, and class as it reshapes traditional Western patterns. As noted previously, I suggest that Hidalgo is better understood in the context of several blockbuster epics that appeared in the same period and explored the conflict between Western and non-Western ideals. For example, Ridley Scott’s Alexander (dir. 2004) featured, among other things, the eastward conquest of the ancient Macedonian king, while Wolfgang Petersen’s Troy (2004) showed the conflict between the nation-states of Greece and the Eastern people of Troy. The 2004 version of King Arthur (dir. Antoine Fuqua) reframes the Riding East—Western Myths, Nostalgia, and the Crossing of Generic Boundaries in Hidalgo (2004)
References
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01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: In the early 1960s, the John Birch Society, a staunchly anticommunist organization founded in 1958 by retired businessman Robert H.W. Welch, became a hotbed of anti-communism in Southern California as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: OF DISSERTATION SAVE OUR REPUBLIC: BATTLING JOHN BIRCH IN CALIFORNIA’S CONSERVATIVE CRADLE Previous accounts of the development of the New American Right have demonstrated the popularity and resonance of the ideology in Southern California. However, these studies have not shown how contention surrounded conservatism’s ascendancy even in regions where it found eager disciples. “Save Our Republic” uses one conservative Southern California community as a vehicle to better understand the foundations of a wider movement and argues the growth of conservatism was not nearly as smooth as earlier studies have suggested. Santa Barbara, California, experienced a much more contentious introduction to the same conservative elements and exemplifies the larger ideological clash that occurred nationwide during the late 1950s and early 1960s between “establishment,” moderate Republicans and the party’s right flank. In California’s cradle of conservatism, the ideology’s birth was not an easy one. Santa Barbara should have provided a bonanza of support for the John Birch Society, a staunchly anticommunist organization founded in 1958 by retired businessman Robert H.W. Welch. Instead, its presence there in the early 1960s divided the city and inspired the sort of suspicion that ultimately hobbled the group’s reputation nationally. Rather than thriving in the city, the JBS impaled itself in a series of self-inflicted wounds that only worsened the effect these characterizations had on the group’s national reputation. Disseminated to a nationwide audience by local newspaper publisher Thomas M. Storke, who declared his intention to banish the organization from the city, the events that occurred in Santa Barbara throughout 1961 alerted other cities of the potential disruption the JBS could inspire in their communities. The JBS would forever bear the battle scars it earned in Santa Barbara. “Save Our Republic” argues the events in Santa Barbara exemplify the more pronounced political battle that was occurring throughout the nation in the 1960s as conservatives grappled to determine the bounds of their ideology. The threat from the right that caused so much handwringing in the halls of conservative power had an equally unsettling effect in the city’s parlors, churches, schoolhouses and newsrooms.

84 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the relative importance of material and ideal factors for social action in philosophy and social theory has been discussed, and the importance of idealism in both actor-oriented (that is, phenomenologist, ethnomethodologist, symbolic interactionist) and structure-oriented theorists has been examined.
Abstract: Perhaps the most vexing problem in philosophy and social theory concerns the relative importance of material and ideal factors for social action. Karl Marx, for instance, with his notion of base and superstructure and his materialistic interpretation of the dialectic process, made a clean break from the idealism of his Hegelian heritage (McLellan 1977:390; Swingewood 1991:62–63). Nevertheless, idealism proved resilient and later came to inform the thinking of both actor-oriented (that is, phenomenologist, ethnomethodologist, symbolic interactionist) and structure-oriented (that is Functionalist, Structuralist) theorists.

65 citations

Book ChapterDOI
31 Dec 2019
TL;DR: Turner as mentioned in this paper was the most eminent historian of his generation, who delivered an academic paper at the historical congress convened in conjunction with the Columbian Exposition, which celebrated the four hundredth anniversary of Columbus's arrival in the Western Hemisphere.
Abstract: Americans have never had much use for history, but we do like anniversaries. In 1893 Frederick Jackson Turner, who would become the most eminent historian of his generation, was in Chicago to deliver an academic paper at the historical congress convened in conjunction with the Columbian Exposition. The occasion for the exposition was a slightly belated celebration of the four hundredth anniversary of Columbus's arrival in the Western Hemisphere. The paper Turner presented was "The Significance of the Frontier in American History." 1

34 citations

DOI
01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: The authors identify a genre of travel writing that they refer to as frontier revival literature, which is particularly important in negotiating North American ideas of imperialism, nationality, citizenship, gender, and race from 1880-1930.
Abstract: In this dissertation, I identify a genre of travel writing that I refer to as frontier revival literature, which I show to be particularly important in negotiating North American ideas of imperialism, nationality, citizenship, gender, and race from 1880-1930. Meaning about cultural identity emerges through motifs of physical movement in frontier revival literature. I focus on how female frontier revival authors appropriate familiar motifs of frontier revival literature to promote women’s rights. Frontier revival literature consists of tourist accounts of travel in western Canada by Canadian and American authors who published in northeastern American cities and who wrote for a largely eastern, urban audience. I show how male frontier revival literature authors use American manifest destiny rhetoric in a western Canadian setting to promote ideas of an intercontinental west that, despite seeming to broadly represent North American progress, are highly gendered and racialized. I combine and adapt elements of feminist and conceptual metaphor theory as a way of reading how women writers of the frontier revival debate such ideas through representations of physical movement. I build on a diverse range of feminist theory to examine how images of the travelling female body negotiate and often contest dominant ideological messages about cultural identity in travel literature by men. I develop conceptual metaphor theory in order to identify a network of metaphors that I see as emerging in frontier revival literature. Focussing on three different chronological stages of frontier revival literature, I apply my methodology in comparative close readings of the following texts by Canadian and American authors: Sara Jeannette Duncan’s A Social Departure: How Orthodocia and I Went Around the

29 citations