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Journal ArticleDOI

The effect of the russia-ukraine conflict on the potential use of nuclear weapons

TL;DR: In this paper , the potential use of nuclear weapons in the conflict between Russia and Ukraine in 2022 is analyzed based on a literature study, Google trend analysis, and media review approach.
Abstract: This research aims to analyze the potential use of nuclear weapons in the conflict between Russia and Ukraine in 2022. Based on a literature study, google trend analysis, and media review approach, there are four findings from this study. First, the goal of Ukraine joining NATO is to increase military strength and to obtain support as well as security guarantees from alliance countries is considered. As a result, Russia responded by increasing its military capability to invade Ukraine to maintain its national security. This situation represents the concept of the security dilemma. Second, the threat of the use of nuclear weapons by Russia as a deterrence strategy against NATO intervention. This intentions have yielded little results, because NATO continues to provide military support to Ukraine. Third, NATO’s weapons assistance to Ukraine has disrupted the balance of power in the international system. The increase in Russian military weapons and nuclear threats as the implementation of the power struggle aims to prevent the NATO alliance from becoming stronger which threatens Russia's national interests. Finally, the media trend analysis indicates that the potential use of nuclear weapons for war is still relatively small and become weaken.
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Book
01 Jan 1978
TL;DR: The model of the Prisoner's Dilemma is used to demonstrate that cooperation is more likely when the costs of being exploited and the gains of exploiting others are low, when the gains from mutual cooperation and the cost of mutual noncooperation are high, and when each side expects the other to cooperate.
Abstract: International anarchy and the resulting security dilemma (i.e., policies which increase one state's security tend to decrease that of others) make it difficult for states to realize their common interests. Two approaches are used to show when and why this dilemma operates less strongly and cooperation is more likely. First, the model of the Prisoner's Dilemma is used to demonstrate that cooperation is more likely when the costs of being exploited and the gains of exploiting others are low, when the gains from mutual cooperation and the costs of mutual noncooperation are high, and when each side expects the other to cooperate. Second, the security dilemma is ameliorated when the defense has the advantage over the offense and when defensive postures differ from offensive ones. These two variables, which can generate four possible security worlds, are influenced by geography and technology.

1,926 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

1,830 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The dilemma of the "security dilemma" has been studied since the dawn of history as mentioned in this paper, where individuals are concerned about their security from being attacked, subjected, dominated, or annihilated by other groups and individuals, and are driven to acquire more and more power in order to escape the impact of others.
Abstract: The heartbreaking plight in which a bipolarized and atom bomb-blessed world finds itself today is but the extreme manifestation of a dilemma with which human societies have had to grapple since the dawn of history. For it stems from a fundamental social constellation, one where a plurality of otherwise interconnected groups constitute ultimate units of political life, that is, where groups live alongside each other without being organized into a higher unity.Wherever such anarchic society has existed—and it has existed in most periods of known history on some level—there has arisen what may be called the ‘security dilemma’ of men, or groups, or their leaders. Groups or individuals living in such a constellation must be, and usually are, concerned about their security from being attacked, subjected, dominated, or annihilated by other groups and individuals. Striving to attain security from such attack, they are driven to acquire more and more power in order to escape the impact of the power of others. This, in turn, renders the others more insecure and compels them to prepare for the worst. Since none can ever feel entirely secure in such a world of competing units, power competition ensues, and the vicious circle of security and power accumulation is on.

794 citations

Book
07 Feb 2013
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors argue that traditional ways of doing business undermine new, more cooperative opportunities that have arisen in international politics since 1989, which is reflected in attempts at "New Thinking" which places societal, environmental and even "Utopian" solutions to military and intelligence problems ahead of traditional concepts of strategy.
Abstract: : Since the end of the Cold War, naval analysts and strategists have faced a crisis. On the one hand, they are well versed with the enduring concepts of strategy, intelligence and the procedures and lessons generated by nearly fifty years of Cold War. On the other hand, there is a widespread notion that traditional ways of doing business undermine new, more cooperative opportunities that have arisen in international politics since 1989. This criticism is reflected in attempts at "New Thinking" which places societal, environmental and even "Utopian" solutions to military and intelligence problems ahead of traditional concepts of strategy. At the same time, events like the Gulf War, Bosnia, Kosovo, Desert Fox and "intelligence surprises" (Indian and Pakistan nuclear testing) demonstrate a mastery of the principles of intelligence and strategy are the cornerstone of U.S. foreign and defense policy.

68 citations

BookDOI
01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: Dutkiewicz et al. as discussed by the authors discuss the challenges of Eurasian integration and propose a vision of a "Philosophy of Nation" for the integration of Eurasia.
Abstract: Introduction Piotr Dutkiewicz 1. Challenges of Eurasian Integration Richard Sakwa 2. Eurasianism as a 'Philosophy of Nation' Valery Badmaev 3. Eurasianism as an Idea, Civilisational Concept and Integration Challenge Alexei Poberezkin and Olga Podberezkina 4. Eurasian Economic Union: Achievements and Prospects Sergei Glazyev and Sergei Tkachuk 5. Russia and the Eurasian Union Sergei Glazyev 6. Kazakhstan and Eurasian Integration Bulat Sultanov 7. Belarus between the EU and the Eurasian Economic Union Elena Korosteleva 8. Ukraine: Between Europe and Eurasia Vladimir Fesenko 9. Ukraine between Eurasia and Europe Oleg Noginsky 10. The EU and the Eurasian Union: Between Partnership and Threat? Vincent DellaSala 11. Europeanisation and the Eurasian Economic Union Ekaterina Furman and Alexander Libman 12. Central Asia: From Peripherality to Centrality Vyacheslav Dodonov, Leila Muzaparova and Dariya Mukhamedzhanova 13. Central Asian Perspectives on Eurasian Regionalism Andrei Kazantsev 14. Turkey: Rising Power or Emerging Dream Oktay Tanrisever 15. The Historic Development of Eurasia's Regional Structure Feng Shaolai 16. The Shanghai Cooperation Organisation, China and Eurasian Integration Yu Bin 17. The Eurasian Moment in Global Politics: A Comparative Analysis of Great Power Strategies for Regional Integration Yang Cheng 18. Eurasia: The Burden of Responsibility Fyodor Lukyanov

48 citations

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What are the foreign policy implications of Ukraine joining NATO?

The paper does not provide information about the foreign policy implications of Ukraine joining NATO.