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Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1080/15213269.2019.1679647

The effects of social information on the enjoyment of online videos: An eye tracking study on the role of attention

04 Mar 2021-Media Psychology (Routledge)-Vol. 24, Iss: 2, pp 214-235
Abstract: Recent experiments showed that the valence of user comments (i.e., social information) presented alongside online videos can alter viewers’ enjoyment of videos. However, it is unclear how much atte...

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Topics: Eye tracking (53%), Valence (psychology) (50%)
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7 results found


Proceedings ArticleDOI: 10.1145/3405962.3405982
30 Jun 2020-
Abstract: Mouse activity is known as an important indicator of user attention and interest on a web page. Many modern commercial web analytics services record and report mouse activity of users on websites. The position of the mouse cursor on the screen is the main source of information, as studies show a correlation between the cursor position during mouse activity and the user's eye gaze. This study focuses on mouse movement directions and speeds, and what they indicate, rather than on the mouse cursor position. Statistical analysis of mouse movements on a technical-educational website, which was selected for this study, sheds light on several interesting patterns. For example, most mouse movements in the examined usage data are either approximately horizontal or approximately vertical, horizontal mouse movements are more frequent than vertical mouse movements, and horizontal movements to the left and to the right are not equivalent in terms of moving time and speed. As this study shows, these statistical findings are related to the reading patterns and behaviors of web users. Associating mouse movements with text reading may potentially highlight content that most users tend to skip, and therefore, might not interest the website audience, and content that many readers read more than once or slowly, meaning it is possibly unclear. This could be useful in locating issues in textual content, in websites in general, and especially in online learning and educational technology applications.

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Topics: Web analytics (53%), Web page (52%)

5 Citations


Book ChapterDOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-60117-1_12
Ilan Kirsh, Mike Joy1Institutions (1)
19 Jul 2020-
Abstract: This paper explores Pointer Assisted Reading (PAR), a reading behavior consisting of moving the mouse cursor (also known as the pointer) along sentences to mark the reading position, similarly to finger-pointing when reading a book. The study shows that PAR is an uncommon reading technique and examines methods to extract and visualize the PAR activity of web users. An analysis shows that PAR data of real users reveal reading properties, such as speed, and reading patterns, such as skipping and rereading. Eye-tracking is usually used to analyze user reading behaviors. This paper advocates for considering PAR-tracking as a feasible alternative to eye-tracking on websites, as tracking the eye gaze of ordinary web users is usually impractical. PAR data might help in spotting quality issues in the textual content of a website, such as unclear text or content that might not interest the website users, based on analyzing reading properties and patterns (e.g. reading speed, skipping, and rereading). Accordingly, PAR-tracking may have various practical applications in a wide range of fields, and particularly in educational technology, e-learning, and web analytics.

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Topics: Web analytics (54%), Web page (53%), Eye tracking (51%)

4 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1177/14614448211015984
Anne Marthe Möller1, Mark Boukes1Institutions (1)
Abstract: Political satire is often consumed on online platforms (e.g. YouTube) and the effects of its consumption may be highly conditional on the user comments that are surrounding it. By manipulating the ...

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Topics: Consumption (economics) (52%)

1 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1080/15213269.2021.1901744
08 Apr 2021-Media Psychology
Abstract: Correlational studies have suggested some harmful effects of television viewing in early childhood, especially for the viewing of fast-paced entertainment programs. However, this has not been consi...

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Topics: Early childhood (50%)

Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1075/IP.00049.HEE
15 Jul 2020-
Abstract: Metaphor production is a creative process of thinking out of the box, which can be of great communicative value to language users. In this study, we explored how metaphor production can be stimulated by different types of cues in an internet environment. Participants (N = 318) were invited to co-create a metaphorical campaign slogan in a social media setting with randomly selected sets of real campaign slogans. We measured how linguistic (metaphor markers) and social media cues (likes) prompt direct metaphor. Results show that the metaphor marker ‘so’ stimulated metaphor production. Likes for previously posted metaphorical slogans did not affect the creation of a metaphor. We found a correlation between the actual and self-perceived creativity of the co-created slogans. Besides, the co-created metaphors both echoed and deviated from previously posted campaign slogans, leading to different degrees of creativity. Co-creation in a social media setting seems a fruitful environment for metaphor production.

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Topics: Metaphor (60%), Creativity (50%)

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33 results found


Open accessBook
Jacob Cohen1Institutions (1)
01 Dec 1969-
Abstract: Contents: Prefaces. The Concepts of Power Analysis. The t-Test for Means. The Significance of a Product Moment rs (subscript s). Differences Between Correlation Coefficients. The Test That a Proportion is .50 and the Sign Test. Differences Between Proportions. Chi-Square Tests for Goodness of Fit and Contingency Tables. The Analysis of Variance and Covariance. Multiple Regression and Correlation Analysis. Set Correlation and Multivariate Methods. Some Issues in Power Analysis. Computational Procedures.

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Topics: Goodness of fit (61%), Contingency table (57%), Effect size (56%) ... show more

103,911 Citations



Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.3758/BF03193146
Abstract: G*Power (Erdfelder, Faul, & Buchner, 1996) was designed as a general stand-alone power analysis program for statistical tests commonly used in social and behavioral research. G*Power 3 is a major extension of, and improvement over, the previous versions. It runs on widely used computer platforms (i.e., Windows XP, Windows Vista, and Mac OS X 10.4) and covers many different statistical tests of thet, F, and χ2 test families. In addition, it includes power analyses forz tests and some exact tests. G*Power 3 provides improved effect size calculators and graphic options, supports both distribution-based and design-based input modes, and offers all types of power analyses in which users might be interested. Like its predecessors, G*Power 3 is free.

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Topics: Windows Vista (55%)

30,063 Citations


Open access
01 Jan 2007-
Abstract: The greater power of bad events over good ones is found in everyday events, major life events (e.g., trauma), close relationship outcomes, social network patterns, interpersonal interactions, and learning processes. Bad emotions, bad parents, and bad feedback have more impact than good ones, and bad information is processed more thoroughly than good. The self is more motivated to avoid bad self-definitions than to pursue good ones. Bad impressions and bad stereotypes are quicker to form and more resistant to disconfirmation than good ones. Various explanations such as diagnosticity and salience help explain some findings, but the greater power of bad events is still found when such variables are controlled. Hardly any exceptions (indicating greater power of good) can be found. Taken together, these findings suggest that bad is stronger than good, as a general principle across a broad range of psychological phenomena.

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4,933 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1037/1089-2680.5.4.323
Abstract: The greater power of bad events over good ones is found in everyday events, major life events (e.g., trauma), close relationship outcomes, social network patterns, interpersonal interactions, and learning processes. Bad emotions, bad parents, and bad feedback have more impact than good ones, and bad information is processed more thoroughly than good. The self is more motivated to avoid bad self-definitions than to pursue good ones. Bad impressions and bad stereotypes are quicker to form and more resistant to disconfirmation than good ones. Various explanations such as diagnosticity and salience help explain some findings, but the greater power of bad events is still found when such variables are controlled. Hardly any exceptions (indicating greater power of good) can be found. Taken together, these findings suggest that bad is stronger than good, as a general principle across a broad range of psychological phenomena.

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4,687 Citations


Performance
Metrics
No. of citations received by the Paper in previous years
YearCitations
20213
20204