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Journal ArticleDOI

The Emergence of Social Space: Rimbaud and the Paris Commune

22 Jan 1992-Comparative Literature-Vol. 44, Iss: 3, pp 327
About: This article is published in Comparative Literature.The article was published on 1992-01-22. It has received 99 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Social space.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors propose the concept of "spacing", which orients the understanding of organizational space towards its material, embodied, affective and minor configurations, and discuss the consequences of such a performative approach to space for the practice and craft of organizational scholarship.
Abstract: This article connects to and extends the attempts to bring space back into critical organizational theory, which, we argue, has mainly been based on the socio-spatial perspective as pioneered by Henri Lefebvre. Taking issue with the various ways in which Lefebvre's work can be interpreted, we develop an alternative route. Adopting a mode of non-representational theorizing as outlined in human geography, we propose the concept of ‘spacing', which orients the understanding of organizational space towards its material, embodied, affective and minor configurations. In discussing the consequences of such a performative approach to space for the practice and craft of organizational scholarship, we argue that our conceptual opening entails a move from representational strategies of extracting representations of the (organizational) world from the world to embodied apprehensions of the everyday performing of organizational space. What can be termed the enactment of organizational geographies in slow motion is inspired and illustrated by the video ‘The Raft' conceived by the artist Bill Viola.

278 citations


Cites background from "The Emergence of Social Space: Rimb..."

  • ...…to Rhythmanalysis, one can find an invitation ‘to conceive of space not as a static reality but as active, generative, to experience space as created by interaction, as something that our bodies reactivate, and that through this reactivation, in turn modifies and transforms us’ (Ross, 2008: 35)....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors discusses two theses which regard the public realm in the modern city from very different perspectives and explores several of the issues which proponents of the two viewpoints interpret differently, and then seeks to understand the strikingly contrary conclusions about the public sphere.
Abstract: Public space is often seen as problem space in the modern city: it is now as it has always been a space of contention. It is the visible and accessible venue wherein the public – comprising institutions and citizens acting in concert – enact rituals and make claims designed to win recognition. This article discusses two theses which regard the public realm in the modern city from very different perspectives. It then seeks to understand the strikingly contrary conclusions about the public sphere by exploring several of the issues which proponents of the two viewpoints interpret differently.

161 citations


Cites background from "The Emergence of Social Space: Rimb..."

  • ...Social expression in this new space ranged widely; the streets in particular played host to an immensely rich and often conflictual variety of activities that defied easy bureaucratic control (Ross, 1988)....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
Ceri Watkins1
TL;DR: In this article, the work of the philosopher Henri Lefebvre has been introduced into the field of organisational analysis, and it is intended to suggest the potential to provide a rich and insightful exploration of organizational space, which is not afforded by many current approaches taken in this field.
Abstract: This paper introduces the work of the philosopher Henri Lefebvre into the field of organisational analysis. In particular it is intended to suggest that Lefebvre’s considerations of space have the potential to provide a rich and insightful exploration of organisational space, which is not afforded by many of the current approaches taken in this field. His development of a spatial triad suggests an approach to organisational analysis that facilitates the contemplation of social, physical and mental spaces to provide an integrated view of organisational space, an approach that is in contrast to many current discussions of organisational space in which the focus is often on only a singular aspect of space. It reveals some of the possibilities inherent in Lefebvre’s theories, through providing an analysis of a specific organisational event from a Lefebvrian perspective and exploring some of the implications of this type of approach for organisational analysis.

155 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The recent resurgence of occupation-based practices across the globe, from the seizure of public space to the assembling of improvised protest camps, is explored in this paper, where the author explores the relationship between the figure of occupation and the affirmation of an alternative "right to the city".
Abstract: This paper explores the recent resurgence of occupation-based practices across the globe, from the seizure of public space to the assembling of improvised protest camps. It re-examines the relationship between the figure of occupation and the affirmation of an alternative ‘right to the city’. The paper develops a critical understanding of occupation as a political process that prefigures and materializes the social order which it seeks to enact. The paper highlights the constituent role of occupation as an autonomous form of urban dwelling, as a radical politics of infrastructure and as a set of relations that produce common spaces for political action.

136 citations


Cites background from "The Emergence of Social Space: Rimb..."

  • ...Autonomy was, in other words, actively assembled as new principles of association and co-operation were extended deep into the structures of everyday life (Ross, 1988: 5, 33; see Lefebvre, 1965)....

    [...]

  • ...…of political posters, notices and announcements meant that the everyday life of the city was now such that ‘citizens were no longer informed of their history after the fact but were actually occupying the moment of its realization’ (Ross, 1988: 42; emphasis added; see also Raunig, 2010)....

    [...]

  • ...But even more than this, Rimbaud’s words were themselves closely connected to the events of the Paris Commune, the largely leaderless government which transformed Paris in the early spring of 1871 into an autonomous Commune and set about the free organization of its social life (Ross, 1988: 5)....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
M Folch-Serra1
TL;DR: In this article, the authors link Mikhail Bakhtin's work to geographical inquiry by linking the two works to different interpretations of the landscape, and propose a map-based approach.
Abstract: Geographers have produced a host of different interpretations of the landscape. In this essay I aim to participate in such an endeavour by linking Mikhail Bakhtin's work to geographical inquiry. Co...

99 citations


Cites background from "The Emergence of Social Space: Rimb..."

  • ...In recent work on discourse, the ways in which discourses are set up historically, spatially, and socially have been explored, accounting for the positions and viewpoints from which people speak, and the institutions which prompt people to speak (Macdonnell, 1987; Ross, 1988)....

    [...]

References
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors propose the concept of "spacing", which orients the understanding of organizational space towards its material, embodied, affective and minor configurations, and discuss the consequences of such a performative approach to space for the practice and craft of organizational scholarship.
Abstract: This article connects to and extends the attempts to bring space back into critical organizational theory, which, we argue, has mainly been based on the socio-spatial perspective as pioneered by Henri Lefebvre. Taking issue with the various ways in which Lefebvre's work can be interpreted, we develop an alternative route. Adopting a mode of non-representational theorizing as outlined in human geography, we propose the concept of ‘spacing', which orients the understanding of organizational space towards its material, embodied, affective and minor configurations. In discussing the consequences of such a performative approach to space for the practice and craft of organizational scholarship, we argue that our conceptual opening entails a move from representational strategies of extracting representations of the (organizational) world from the world to embodied apprehensions of the everyday performing of organizational space. What can be termed the enactment of organizational geographies in slow motion is inspired and illustrated by the video ‘The Raft' conceived by the artist Bill Viola.

278 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors discusses two theses which regard the public realm in the modern city from very different perspectives and explores several of the issues which proponents of the two viewpoints interpret differently, and then seeks to understand the strikingly contrary conclusions about the public sphere.
Abstract: Public space is often seen as problem space in the modern city: it is now as it has always been a space of contention. It is the visible and accessible venue wherein the public – comprising institutions and citizens acting in concert – enact rituals and make claims designed to win recognition. This article discusses two theses which regard the public realm in the modern city from very different perspectives. It then seeks to understand the strikingly contrary conclusions about the public sphere by exploring several of the issues which proponents of the two viewpoints interpret differently.

161 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Ceri Watkins1
TL;DR: In this article, the work of the philosopher Henri Lefebvre has been introduced into the field of organisational analysis, and it is intended to suggest the potential to provide a rich and insightful exploration of organizational space, which is not afforded by many current approaches taken in this field.
Abstract: This paper introduces the work of the philosopher Henri Lefebvre into the field of organisational analysis. In particular it is intended to suggest that Lefebvre’s considerations of space have the potential to provide a rich and insightful exploration of organisational space, which is not afforded by many of the current approaches taken in this field. His development of a spatial triad suggests an approach to organisational analysis that facilitates the contemplation of social, physical and mental spaces to provide an integrated view of organisational space, an approach that is in contrast to many current discussions of organisational space in which the focus is often on only a singular aspect of space. It reveals some of the possibilities inherent in Lefebvre’s theories, through providing an analysis of a specific organisational event from a Lefebvrian perspective and exploring some of the implications of this type of approach for organisational analysis.

155 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The recent resurgence of occupation-based practices across the globe, from the seizure of public space to the assembling of improvised protest camps, is explored in this paper, where the author explores the relationship between the figure of occupation and the affirmation of an alternative "right to the city".
Abstract: This paper explores the recent resurgence of occupation-based practices across the globe, from the seizure of public space to the assembling of improvised protest camps. It re-examines the relationship between the figure of occupation and the affirmation of an alternative ‘right to the city’. The paper develops a critical understanding of occupation as a political process that prefigures and materializes the social order which it seeks to enact. The paper highlights the constituent role of occupation as an autonomous form of urban dwelling, as a radical politics of infrastructure and as a set of relations that produce common spaces for political action.

136 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
M Folch-Serra1
TL;DR: In this article, the authors link Mikhail Bakhtin's work to geographical inquiry by linking the two works to different interpretations of the landscape, and propose a map-based approach.
Abstract: Geographers have produced a host of different interpretations of the landscape. In this essay I aim to participate in such an endeavour by linking Mikhail Bakhtin's work to geographical inquiry. Co...

99 citations