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Journal ArticleDOI

The estimation of cement film thickness by an in vivo technique.

03 Aug 1971-British Dental Journal (Br Dent J)-Vol. 131, Iss: 3, pp 107-111

About: This article is published in British Dental Journal.The article was published on 1971-08-03. It has received 890 citation(s) till now.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article reviews the current literature covering all-ceramic materials and systems, with respect to survival, material properties, marginal and internal fit, cementation and bonding, and color and esthetics, and provides clinical recommendations for their use.
Abstract: Statement of problem Developments in ceramic core materials such as lithium disilicate, aluminum oxide, and zirconium oxide have allowed more widespread application of all-ceramic restorations over the past 10 years. With a plethora of ceramic materials and systems currently available for use, an overview of the scientific literature on the efficacy of this treatment therapy is indicated. Purpose This article reviews the current literature covering all-ceramic materials and systems, with respect to survival, material properties, marginal and internal fit, cementation and bonding, and color and esthetics, and provides clinical recommendations for their use. Material and methods A comprehensive review of the literature was completed seeking evidence for the treatment of teeth with all-ceramic restorations. A search of English language peer-reviewed literature was undertaken using MEDLINE and PubMed with a focus on evidence-based research articles published between 1996 and 2006. A hand search of relevant dental journals was also completed. Randomized controlled trials, nonrandomized controlled studies, longitudinal experimental clinical studies, longitudinal prospective studies, and longitudinal retrospective studies were reviewed. The last search was conducted on June 12, 2007. Data supporting the clinical application of all-ceramic materials and systems was sought. Results The literature demonstrates that multiple all-ceramic materials and systems are currently available for clinical use, and there is not a single universal material or system for all clinical situations. The successful application is dependent upon the clinician to match the materials, manufacturing techniques, and cementation or bonding procedures, with the individual clinical situation. Conclusions Within the scope of this systematic review, there is no evidence to support the universal application of a single ceramic material and system for all clinical situations. Additional longitudinal clinical studies are required to advance the development of ceramic materials and systems.

766 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An overview of CAD/CAM-technologies and systems available for dentistry today is given, which enable the access to new, almost defect-free, industrially prefabricated and controlled materials and an improvement in precision and planning, as well as an increase in efficiency.
Abstract: As in many other industries, production stages are increasingly becoming automated in dental technology. As the price of dental laboratory work has become a major factor in treatment planning and therapy, automation could enable more competitive production in high-wage areas like Western Europe and the USA. Advances in computer technology now enable cost-effective production of individual pieces. Dental restorations produced with computer assistance have become more common in recent years. Most dental companies have access to CAD/CAM procedures, either in the dental practice, the dental laboratory or in the form of production centres. The many benefits associated with CAD/CAM generated dental restorations include: the access to new, almost defect-free, industrially prefabricated and controlled materials; an increase in quality and reproducibility and also data storage commensurate with a standardised chain of production; an improvement in precision and planning, as well as an increase in efficiency. As a result of continual developments in computer hardware and software, new methods of production and new treatment concepts are to be expected, which will enable an additional reduction in costs. Dentists, who will be confronted with these techniques in the future, require certain basic knowledge if they are to benefit from these new procedures. This article gives an overview of CAD/CAM-technologies and systems available for dentistry today.

590 citations


Cites background from "The estimation of cement film thick..."

  • ...Thus, the demands of the literature concerning marginal adaptation of dental restorations can be reached with this technology...

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Based on the limited number of short-term in vivo studies, zirconia appears to be suitable for the fabrication of single crowns, and fixed partial dentures and implant abutments providing strict protocols during the manufacturing and delivery process are adhered to.
Abstract: Zirconia is unique in its polymorphic crystalline makeup, reported to be sensitive to manufacturing and handling processes, and there is debate about which processing method is least harmful to the final product. Currently, zirconia restorations are manufactured by either soft or hard-milling processes, with the manufacturer of each claiming advantages over the other. Chipping of the veneering porcelain is reported as a common problem and has been labelled as its main clinical setback. The objective of this systematic review is to report on the clinical success of zirconia-based restorations fabricated by both milling processes, in regard to framework fractures and veneering porcelain chipping. A comprehensive review of the literature was completed for in vivo trials on zirconia restorations in MEDLINE and PubMed between 1950 and 2009. A manual hand search of relevant dental journals was also completed. Seventeen clinical trials involving zirconia-based restorations were found, 13 were conducted on fixed partial dentures, two on single crowns and two on zirconia implant abutments, of which 11 were based on soft-milled zirconia and six on hard-milled zirconia. Chipping of the veneering porcelain was a common occurrence, and framework fracture was only observed in soft-milled zirconia. Based on the limited number of short-term in vivo studies, zirconia appears to be suitable for the fabrication of single crowns, and fixed partial dentures and implant abutments providing strict protocols during the manufacturing and delivery process are adhered to. Further long-term prospective studies are necessary to establish the best manufacturing process for zirconia-based restorations.

402 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: It is possible to produce complete crowns, inlays, and onlays as well as fixed prostheses from various materials through use of computer-aided design and manufacturing. This report from France stresses the clinical application of this system. After a long period of research, computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) in dentistry has become clinically applicable. This article U exclusively aimed at the clinical practice of dentistry. Setting aside scientific considerations, the practitioner will learn, through this paper, how the system is used.

371 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The dental literature was reviewed to identify the clinical methods that have been used to evaluate implant framework fit and it is suggested that clinicians use a combination of the available methods to minimize misfits.
Abstract: Statement of problem. Passive fit of implant-supported–prosthesis frameworks has been suggested as a prerequisite for successful long-term osseointegration. However, there are no scientific guidelines as to what is passive fit and how to achieve and measure it. Purpose. The purpose of this article is to discuss passive fit and to review the various clinical methods that have been suggested for evaluating implant framework fit. Methods. The dental literature was reviewed to identify the clinical methods that have been used to evaluate implant framework fit. Conclusions. The suggested levels of passive fit are empirical. Numerous techniques have been advocated to evaluate the prosthesis-implant interface, but none individually provides objective results. It is suggested that clinicians use a combination of the available methods to minimize misfits. (J Prosthet Dent 1999;81:7-13.)

308 citations


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No. of citations received by the Paper in previous years
YearCitations
20221
202171
202094
201978
201872
201785