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The Experiences of Women During the Holocaust

About: The article was published on 2004-01-01 and is currently open access. It has received None citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: The Holocaust.
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TL;DR: Between dignity and despair: jewish life in nazi germany between despair and despair as mentioned in this paper between depression and hope: a view "from below" between the two extremes.
Abstract: between dignity and despair jewish life in nazi germany jewish life in nazi germany—a view “from below” between dignity and despair jewish life in nazi germany between dignity and despair jewish life in nazi germany between dignity and despair: jewish life in nazi germany between dignity and despair jewish life in nazi germany download between dignity and despair: jewish life in nazi between dignity and despair: jewish life in nazi germany marion a. kaplan, between dignity and despair between dignity and despair: jewish life in nazi germany a nazi childhood: hitler’s germany, 1939-1945 between dignity and despair jewish life in nazi germany between dignity and despair jewish life in nazi germany the holocaust in 20 usc shoah foundation the history of germany ii syllabus rutgers ncas life in nazi germany dilemmas and responses cofp his 362g introduction to the holocaust fall 2016 his 362g introduction to the holocaust spring 2011 c&i 515 holocaust history, memory, and education the history of germany ii rutgers ncas history 323 the holocaust in 20 th century europe jewish history ii: jews in the modern world women’s experiences during the holocaust – new books in print pols 3101/hist 3100: nazi germany fall 2010 his 362g introduction to the holocaust spring 2014 memories of history: women and the holocaust in holocaust and catholic conscience, the the university of north carolina at greensboro his 376 c&i 515 holocaust history, memory, and education stephen f. austin state university modern germany professor koshar prelims: spring 2011 5en in w the holocaust welcome to the united nations jews, nazi germany, and canadian public opinion select ebook for download amazon s3 his 376: germany & the world in the 20th century a digital books and videos on the holocaust at the georgia tech library women’s experiences during the holocaust – new books in print history alumni news queens college, city university of 6 x 10.5 long title cambridge university press life in nazi germany dilemmas and responses jlip 2011 history 261 rutgers university abstract title of document: “an uncertain life in another

152 citations

Book
30 Mar 2020
TL;DR: Different Voices as discussed by the authors is a collection of women's experiences of the Holocaust, focusing on the double jeopardy of Jewish women in the Holocaust; it gathers together the latest insights of scholars, powerful testimonies of survivors, and eloquent reflections of writers, theologians, and philosophers.
Abstract: Until now there has never been a systematic assessment of the "double jeopardy" of Jewish women in the Holocaust, because most of the chroniclers of this cruelest tragedy of modern history have been men. Yet for women, as scholar Myrna Goldenberg observes, "The hell was the same, but the horrors were different." Different Voices is the most thoroughgoing examination of women's experiences of the Holocaust ever compiled. It gathers together - for the first time in a single volume - the latest insights of scholars, the powerful testimonies of survivors, and the eloquent reflections of writers, theologians, and philosophers. Twenty-eight women in all speak of Hitler's "Final Solution, " from the rising storm in prewar Germany to the terrors and privations of the camps, and of the everyday heroism that kept hope alive. Part One, "Voices of Experience, " recounts the painful and poignant stories of survivors. We hear Olga Lengyel's anguish at discovering that she had unwittingly sent her mother and son to the gas chamber; on recalling the brutality of Irma Griese, a stunningly beautiful SS officer; on witnessing the unspeakable "medical experiments" the Nazis conducted on women. We share Livia F. Britton's memory of hunger and terrible vulnerability as a naked thirteen-year-old at Auschwitz. We learn of the horrific price that Dr. Gisela Perl was forced to pay to save women's lives. Part Two, "Voices of Interpretation, " offers the new insights of women scholars of the Holocaust, including evidence that the Nazis specifically preyed on women as the propagators of the Jewish race. Marion A. Kaplan describes the lives of a generation of Jewish women who thought that they were assimilated intoGerman society. Gisela Bok examines the Nazi's eugenics theories and sterilization programs, and Gitta Sereny questions Theresa Stangl, wife of the Kommandant of Sobibor and Treblinka, about her perceptions of the atrocities and of her moral responsibility. In Part Three, "Voices of

72 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In recent years several scientists who have sought to use the Nazi research have attracted and stirred widespread soul-searching about the social responsibility and potential abuses of science.
Abstract: Since the Nuremberg trials, our society has had to confront the reality that the Nazi doctors were guilty of premeditated murder masqueraded as research. Professional modern medicine has had little difficulty condemning the Nazi doctors as evil men. But what is being said of the continued use of the Nazi doctors' medical research? Many scholars are now discovering in reputable medical literature multiple references to Nazi experiments, or republished works of former SS doctors. These studies and references frequently bear no disclaimer as to how the data was obtained. In recent years several scientists who have sought to use the Nazi research have attracted and stirred widespread soul-searching about the social responsibility and potential abuses of science.

32 citations