scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Journal ArticleDOI

The First Wave of American “Holocaust” Films, 1945–1959

01 Feb 2010-The American Historical Review (Oxford University Press)-Vol. 115, Iss: 1, pp 90-114
About: This article is published in The American Historical Review.The article was published on 2010-02-01. It has received 14 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: The Holocaust.
Citations
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The history of Hollywood's on-screen relationship with the State of Israel is often thought to have begun with Otto Preminger's Exodus, an epic account of Jewish bravery in late-1940s Palestine rel...
Abstract: The history of Hollywood’s on-screen relationship with the State of Israel is often thought to have begun with Otto Preminger’s Exodus, an epic account of Jewish bravery in late-1940s Palestine rel...

6 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Zone of Interest as mentioned in this paper is dedicated to the writer and Holocaust survivor Primo Levi, whose voice can be heard throughout the text, and it is one of the main voices of the novel.
Abstract: Amis has always found the question of the Holocaust’s exceptionalism fascinating and returns to the subject in “The Zone of Interest”. After analysing how the enormity of the Holocaust conditions literary representation and Amis’s own approach to it, this article focuses on one of the main voices of the novel, Szmul, the leader of the Sonderkommando, whose members were Jewish prisoners forced to clean the gas chambers and dispose of the bodies. Through him we confront directly the horrors of the Holocaust. One of Amis’ greatest achievements is precisely that he humanizes and rehabilitates the figure of the Sonder by transforming Szmul into a comic hero who, in spite of the atrocities he witnesses, reaffirms the unconditional value of life and fights to give meaning to his terrible predicament. The novel is dedicated to the writer and Holocaust survivor Primo Levi, whose voice can be heard throughout the text.

6 citations

01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: The authors argue that Inglourious Basterds's self-conscious Americanization of the Holocaust functions as a critique of American popular culture's tendency to adopt the Holocaust as a screen memory.
Abstract: This essay argues that Inglourious Basterds's self-conscious Americanization of the Holocaust functions as a critique of American popular culture's tendency to adopt the Holocaust as a screen memory. Rather than participating in this phenomenon, though, the film uses postmodern parody and what I term "historiographic meta- cinema" to lay bare the ways in which Hollywood representations of the Holocaust have shaped, and in some cases have distorted, public memory of the event. In its revision of history, I suggest, the film calls attention to the appropriation of Holocaust memory by American popular culture and consequently draws attention to America's reluctance to confront its own legacy of racial prejudice.

5 citations


Cites background from "The First Wave of American “Holocau..."

  • ...As Lawrence Baron’s study of American cinema from 1945 to 1959 shows, many films treated all Nazi victims equally, and thus did not make an eff ort to create stories that identified Jews as the target of Nazi aggression.(14) In fact, most films dealing with Jewish victims of the Nazis typically focused on the aft ermath rather than on the Holocaust itself....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Oct 2013
TL;DR: One of the most prominent films made by producer-director Stanley Kramer, from an original screenplay by Abby Mann, Judgment at Nuremberg (1961) is a fictional film based on factual events, and depicts the trial of four judges for their crimes during the Nazi regime.
Abstract: One of the most prominent films made by producer-director Stanley Kramer, from an original screenplay by Abby Mann, Judgment at Nuremberg (1961) is a fictional film based on factual events, and depicts the trial of four judges for their crimes during the Nazi regime. Set in 1948, the film nonetheless related closely to events in 1961, chiefly the trial of Adolf Eichmann and the building of the Berlin Wall—pivotal moments in Holocaust remembrance and the intensification of Cold War hostilities. As Jewish filmmakers, Kramer and Mann shared a commitment to remembrance that contradicts a longstanding—although recently challenged—historiographical contention that Jewish Americans paid little public attention to what came to be called the “Holocaust” until the Eichmann trial or after. Although Kramer was a Hollywood filmmaker who made films for commercial release and popular consumption, he and Mann also felt a responsibility to history. Utilizing the techniques of historical film analysis, this essay examines the filmmakers’ practice of historical filmmaking; their film’s representation and interpretation of the past to include surviving witnesses and Nazi perpetrators, and what has come to be called “particularism” and “universalism”; and the film’s reception by a range of contemporary audiences. Reconsidering Judgment at Nuremberg demonstrates it cannot be categorized as an example of the “Americanization” or “Hollywoodization” of the Holocaust.

3 citations

References
More filters
Book
01 Sep 2004
TL;DR: A Tree Grows in Brooklyn as mentioned in this paper is a classic story about a working-class family in the early 1930s, and it was adapted for TV by Lillian Smith and Lola Hansberry.
Abstract: Acknowledgments Part 1. Ordinary Families, Popular Culture, and Popular Democracy, 1935-1945 Radio's Formula Drama Popular Theater and Popular Democracy Popular Democracy on the Radio Popular Democracy in Wartime: Multiethnic and Multiracial? Representing the Soldier The New World of the Home Front Soldiers as Veterans: Imagining the Postwar World Looking Back Stories Part 2. Making the Working-Class Family Ordinary: A Tree Grows in Brooklyn From Working-Class Daughter to Working-Class Writer Revising 1930s Radical Visions Remembering a Working-Class Past Instructing the Middle Class The Ethnic and Racial Boundaries of the Ordinary Making Womanhood Ordinary Hollywood Revises A Tree Grows in Brooklyn The Declining Appeal of Tree's Social Terrain Part 3. Home Front Harmony and Remembering Mama "Mama's Bank Account" and Other Ethnic Working-Class Fictions Remembering Mama on the Stage The Mother Next Door on Film, 1947-1948 Mama on CBS, 1949-1956 The Appeal of TV Mama's Ordinary Family "Trading Places" Stories Part 4. Loving Across Prewar Racial and Sexual Boundaries Lillian Smith and Strange Fruit Quality Reinstates the Color Line Strange Fruit as Failed Social Drama The Returning Negro Soldier, Interracial Romance, and Deep Are the Roots Interracial Male Homosociability in Home of the Brave Part 5. "Seeing Through" Jewishness Perception and Racial Boundaries in Focus Policing Racial and Gender Boundaries in The Brick Foxhole Recasting the Victim in Crossfire Deracializing Jewishness in Gentleman's Agreement Part 6. Hollywood Makes Race (In)Visible "A Great Step Forward": The Film Home of the Brave Lost Boundaries: Racial Indeterminacy as Whiteness Pinky: Racial Indeterminacy as Blackness Trading Places or No Way Out? Everyman Stories Part 7. Competing Postwar Representations of Universalism The "Truly Universal People": Richard Durham's Destination Freedom The Evolution of Arthur Miller's Ordinary Family Miller's Search for "the People," 1947-1948 The Creation of an Ordinary American Tragedy: Death of a Salesman The Rising Tide of Anticommunism Part 8. Marital Realism and Everyman Love Stories Marital Realism Before and After the Blacklist The Promise of Live Television Drama Paddy Chayefsky's Everyman Ethnicity Conservative and Corporate Constraints on Representing the Ordinary Filming Television's "Ordinary": Marty's Everyman Romance Part 9. Reracializing the Ordinary American Family: Raisin in the Sun Lorraine Hansberry's South Side Childhood Leaving Home, Stepping "Deliberately Against the Beat" The Freedom Family and the Black Left "I Am a Writer": Hansberry in Greenwich Village Raisin in the Sun: Hansberry's Conception, Audience Reception Frozen in the Frame: The Film of Raisin Visions of Belonging Notes Index

18 citations