scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Journal ArticleDOI

The First Wave of American “Holocaust” Films, 1945–1959

01 Feb 2010-The American Historical Review (Oxford University Press)-Vol. 115, Iss: 1, pp 90-114
About: This article is published in The American Historical Review.The article was published on 2010-02-01. It has received 14 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: The Holocaust.
Citations
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
28 Sep 2019
TL;DR: In this article, the authors focus on the ways in which sexualization is used specifically to portray female perpetrators in The Reader, as a fictional Holocaust film, and argue that Hanna's sexualized female body is constructed as a central part of the revelation of her perpetration.
Abstract: The publication of Bernhard Schlink’s novel The Reader (1995) sparked conversation and controversy about sexuality, female perpetrators and the complexity of guilt regarding the Holocaust. The screen adaptation of the book (Daldry 2008) amplified these discussions on an international scale. Fictional Holocaust films have a history of being met with skepticism or even reject on the one hand and great acclaim on the other hand. As this paper will outline, the focus has often been on male perpetrators and female victims. The portrayal of female perpetration reveals dichotomous stereotypes, often neglecting the complexity of the subject matter. This paper focuses on the ways in which sexualization is used specifically to portray female perpetrators in The Reader, as a fictional Holocaust film. An assessment of Hanna’s relationship to Michael and her autonomous sexuality and her later inferior, victimized portrayal as an ambiguous perpetrator is the focus of my paper. Hanna’s sexuality is structurally separated from her role as a perpetrator. Hanna’s perpetration is, through the dichotomous motif of sexuality throughout the film, characterized by a feminization. However, this feminization entails a relativization of Hanna’s culpability, revealing a pejorative of her depiction as a perpetrator. Consequently, I argue that Hanna’s sexualized female body is constructed as a central part of the revelation of her perpetration.

2 citations


Cites background from "The First Wave of American “Holocau..."

  • ...Fictional, particularly Hollywood, productions of Holocaust narratives have been criticized for simplifying, romanticizing and/or universalizing Holocaust events (Baron 2010; Doneson 1987; Langer 1995)....

    [...]

28 May 2016
TL;DR: I would like to express my appreciation and gratitude to my advisor Professor Ronnie Close for his useful guidance, support, and encouragement throughout the whole process of my thesis, and for giving me one last chance to complete it.
Abstract: I would like to express my appreciation and gratitude to my advisor Professor Ronnie Close for his useful guidance, support, and encouragement throughout the whole process of my thesis — and for giving me one last chance. I would also like to thank Dean Adham Ramadan and Professor Amani Ismail for their support, patience and encouragement in my time of need. To my friend and esteemed colleague Dalia Al Nimr, words can express my gratitude for your help and assistance during this whole year. Your never-ending faith and support was one of my motivations to stay focused and committed to completing my thesis. I thank you for all that you have done and I hope one day I can pay back this huge favor. I would also like to thank Vice President Dina Abulfotuh for your adamant conviction of my ability to complete my degree, as well as your support — emotionally and professionally — which gave me the serenity and strength to actually complete it. Beyond any doubt you have been my constant example of will and determination, which was inspiring for me and helped me pursue my degree. Furthermore, I would like to thank my thesis readers Professor Hussein Amin and Professor Sara El Khalili, as well as all my JRMC professors who have taught me well, specifically Professor Rasha Abdallah and Professor Mervat Abou Oaf. Your teachings and knowledge have benefitted me, not only for my thesis, but also throughout the years of my master’s degree. To my loving family — Dad, Mom, Iman, Mohamed, and the little princesses — Thank you! Thank your for your patience and understanding, support and prayers, love and affection. I would not have been able to do any of this without you. To my friends, My Shilla all over the world, your words of encouragement were always appreciated and helped me through my years of study: Ruby, Irene, Ranya, Amira, Reham, Ghalia, May, Khouloud, May and Munire. A special thanks to Katharyn Gadient, Regie Mauricio and Shadi Afifi for your valuable participation. To my JRMC besties, Aline Bahari, Hala Touta, and Yousra El Sayed, had it not been for our shared journey and your endless moral support and encouragement, I would not have been this excited to graduate and be with you at commencement. It is a joy and pleasure to have you by my side in such a memorial occasion. Not only did I earn my master’s degree, but I gained your lovely friendship as well. Thank you all!

1 citations


Cites background from "The First Wave of American “Holocau..."

  • ...According to Baron, the Production Code Administration censored Hollywood productions of any Jewish Holocaust suffering or from explicit graphic images of violence of the Third Reich (Baron, 2010)....

    [...]

  • ...…concentration camps and death camps in newspapers, newsreels, and magazines in 1944 and 1945 exposed the American public to far more gruesome images” (Baron, 2010, p. 93) was Hollywood gradually 13 able to produce films of this genre and to address the anti-Semitism war like Orson Welles’s The…...

    [...]

  • ...post-World War II (between 1945 and 1959) focused on postwar consequences and the status of the European Jewry, instead of focusing on their losses and the trauma they endured during the war (Baron, 2010)....

    [...]

  • ...14 In alignment with the Israeli propagandist image, Hollywood films produced post-World War II (between 1945 and 1959) focused on postwar consequences and the status of the European Jewry, instead of focusing on their losses and the trauma they endured during the war (Baron, 2010)....

    [...]

  • ...Such special pleading might draw attention to their immigrant origins and alleged unpatriotic priorities” (Baron, 2010, p. 91)....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, Howard Jacobson is a great comic novelist who fuses comedy and tragedy in his novels because he firmly believes that the more tragic the themes the more obliged he is to exploit the comedy in them.
Abstract: Jewish people have used humor as a talisman to survive in a world hedged with the threat of every horror and every ignominy. Howard Jacobson is a great comic novelist who fuses comedy and tragedy in his novels because he firmly believes that the more tragic the themes the more obliged he is to exploit the comedy in them. In fact, in Kalooki Nights Jacobson shows not only that it is possible to laugh about the Holocaust without minimizing the horrifying reality being explored, but that comedy is a mode of survival that offers us a renewed sense of life in the midst of so much pain.
References
More filters
Book
01 Sep 2004
TL;DR: A Tree Grows in Brooklyn as mentioned in this paper is a classic story about a working-class family in the early 1930s, and it was adapted for TV by Lillian Smith and Lola Hansberry.
Abstract: Acknowledgments Part 1. Ordinary Families, Popular Culture, and Popular Democracy, 1935-1945 Radio's Formula Drama Popular Theater and Popular Democracy Popular Democracy on the Radio Popular Democracy in Wartime: Multiethnic and Multiracial? Representing the Soldier The New World of the Home Front Soldiers as Veterans: Imagining the Postwar World Looking Back Stories Part 2. Making the Working-Class Family Ordinary: A Tree Grows in Brooklyn From Working-Class Daughter to Working-Class Writer Revising 1930s Radical Visions Remembering a Working-Class Past Instructing the Middle Class The Ethnic and Racial Boundaries of the Ordinary Making Womanhood Ordinary Hollywood Revises A Tree Grows in Brooklyn The Declining Appeal of Tree's Social Terrain Part 3. Home Front Harmony and Remembering Mama "Mama's Bank Account" and Other Ethnic Working-Class Fictions Remembering Mama on the Stage The Mother Next Door on Film, 1947-1948 Mama on CBS, 1949-1956 The Appeal of TV Mama's Ordinary Family "Trading Places" Stories Part 4. Loving Across Prewar Racial and Sexual Boundaries Lillian Smith and Strange Fruit Quality Reinstates the Color Line Strange Fruit as Failed Social Drama The Returning Negro Soldier, Interracial Romance, and Deep Are the Roots Interracial Male Homosociability in Home of the Brave Part 5. "Seeing Through" Jewishness Perception and Racial Boundaries in Focus Policing Racial and Gender Boundaries in The Brick Foxhole Recasting the Victim in Crossfire Deracializing Jewishness in Gentleman's Agreement Part 6. Hollywood Makes Race (In)Visible "A Great Step Forward": The Film Home of the Brave Lost Boundaries: Racial Indeterminacy as Whiteness Pinky: Racial Indeterminacy as Blackness Trading Places or No Way Out? Everyman Stories Part 7. Competing Postwar Representations of Universalism The "Truly Universal People": Richard Durham's Destination Freedom The Evolution of Arthur Miller's Ordinary Family Miller's Search for "the People," 1947-1948 The Creation of an Ordinary American Tragedy: Death of a Salesman The Rising Tide of Anticommunism Part 8. Marital Realism and Everyman Love Stories Marital Realism Before and After the Blacklist The Promise of Live Television Drama Paddy Chayefsky's Everyman Ethnicity Conservative and Corporate Constraints on Representing the Ordinary Filming Television's "Ordinary": Marty's Everyman Romance Part 9. Reracializing the Ordinary American Family: Raisin in the Sun Lorraine Hansberry's South Side Childhood Leaving Home, Stepping "Deliberately Against the Beat" The Freedom Family and the Black Left "I Am a Writer": Hansberry in Greenwich Village Raisin in the Sun: Hansberry's Conception, Audience Reception Frozen in the Frame: The Film of Raisin Visions of Belonging Notes Index

18 citations