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The Four Fundamental Concepts of Psychoanalysis

01 Jan 1973-
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe a year's seminar in which Dr. Lacan addressed a larger, less specialized audience than ever before, among whom he could not assume familiarity with his work.
Abstract: This volume is based on a year's seminar in which Dr. Lacan addressed a larger, less specialized audience than ever before, among whom he could not assume familiarity with his work. For his listeners then, and for his readers now, he wanted to "introduce a certain coherence into the major concepts on which psycho-analysis is based," namely, the unconscious, repetition, the transference, and the drive. Along the way he argues for a structural affinity between psychoanalysis and language, discusses the relation of psychoanalysis to religion, and reveals his particular stance on topics ranging from sexuality and death to alienation and repression. This book constitutes the essence of Dr. Lacan's sensibility.
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MonographDOI
TL;DR: This book discusses the development of models for the memory, the arts of memory, and the ethics of reading in the context of a youth-services agency.
Abstract: Introduction 1. Models for the memory 2. Descriptions of the neuropsychology of memory 3. Elementary memory design 4. The arts of memory 5. Memory and the ethics of reading 6. Memory and authority 7. Memory and the book Afterword Appendixes List of abbreviations Bibliography.

786 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a theoretical exploration of the student's experience of higher education by reframing how we view this, from a focus on surface/strategic/deep approaches to learning to a focused on alienated or engaged experiences of learning is presented.
Abstract: This article offers a theoretical exploration of the student's experience of higher education by reframing how we view this, from a focus on surface/strategic/deep approaches to learning to a focus on alienated or engaged experiences of learning. The article focuses on alienation and offers seven different perspectives on how we might understand this experience of higher education. Implications are then drawn for how, as teachers, we might respond.

646 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: There is a scene in the cultural writings of English colonialism which repeats so insistently after the early nineteenth century-and, through that repetition, so triumphantly inaugurates a literature of empire-that I am bound to repeat it once more as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: There is a scene in the cultural writings of English colonialism which repeats so insistently after the early nineteenth century-and, through that repetition, so triumphantly inaugurates a literature of empire-that I am bound to repeat it once more. It is the scenario, played out in the wild and wordless wastes of colonial India, Africa, the Caribbean, of the sudden, fortuitous discovery of the English book. It is, like all myths of origin, memorable for its balance between epiphany and enunciation. The discovery of the book is, at once, a moment of originality and authority, as well as a process of displacement that, paradoxically, makes the presence of the book wondrous to the extent to which it is repeated, translated, misread, displaced. It is with the emblem of the English book-"signs taken for wonders"-as an insignia of colonial authority and a signifier of colonial desire and discipline, that I want to begin this essay.

629 citations

Book
01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: The relationship between language and sexual desire is explored in this article, with a broad definition of "sexuality" and a discussion of the discursive construction of sexuality and the verbal expression of erotic desire.
Abstract: This lively and accessible textbook looks at how we talk about sex and why we talk about it the way we do. Drawing on a wide range of examples, from personal ads to phone sex, from sado-masochistic scenes to sexual assault trials, the book provides a clear introduction to the relationship between language and sexuality. Using a broad definition of 'sexuality', the book encompasses not only issues surrounding sexual orientation and identity but also questions about the discursive construction of sexuality and the verbal expression of erotic desire. Cameron and Kulick contextualize their findings within current research in linguistics, anthropology and psychology, and bring together relevant theoretical debates on sexuality, gender, identity, desire, meaning and power. Topical and entertaining, this much-needed textbook will be welcomed by students and researchers in sociolinguistics, linguistic anthropology and gender/sexuality studies, as well as anyone interested in the relationship between language and sex.

604 citations

Reference BookDOI
01 Jan 2003

558 citations