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MonographDOI

The Great Rebellion of 1857 in India : Exploring Transgressions, Contests and Diversities

25 Feb 2010-pp 161-178
TL;DR: In this article, Biswamoy Pati and Shashank S. Sinha discuss the role of women in the 1857 rebellion of Adivasis of Chotanagpur.
Abstract: 1. Introduction: The Great Rebellion, Biswamoy Pati 2. 1857 and the Adivasis of Chotanagpur, Shashank S. Sinha 3. Remembering Gonoo: The Profile of an Adivasi Rebel of 1857, Sanjukta Dasgupta 4. Beyond Colonial Mapping: Common People, Fuzzy Boundaries and the Rebellion of 1857, Biswamoy Pati 5. Forests on Fire: The 1857 Rebellion in Tribal Andhra, B. Rama Chandra Reddy 6. Contested sites: The Prison, Penal Laws and the 1857 Revolt, Madhurima Sen 7. Courtesans and the 1857 Revolt: The Role of Azeezun in Kanpur, Lata Singh 8. Discourses of 'Gendered Loyalty': Constructing Indian Women in 'Mutiny' Fiction of the Nineteenth century, Indrani Sen 9. The 'Disposable' Brethren: European Marginals in Eastern India during the Great Rebellion, Sarmsitha De 10. Sanitizing Indigenous Memory: 1857 and Mughal Exile, Amar Farooqui 11. Ideas, Memories and Meanings: Adi Dravida Interpretations of the Impact of the 1857 Rebellion, Raj Shekhar Basu
Citations
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DissertationDOI
01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: In this article, a reassessment of the Historiography of Iron and Salt in Colonial India is presented, with a focus on the history of iron and salt production in India.
Abstract: 5 Chapter 1 Rethinking Iron and Salt Manufacture in India, 1765-1858 9 Introduction Reassessment of the Historiography of Iron and Salt in Colonial India – Subject Matter of the Thesis – Chapter

16 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: Vibert et al. as mentioned in this paper examined the development of these roles in the missionary and secular philanthropic communities and how these women used periodicals as a space to implicitly demonstrate their competence and explicitly argue for their status as educators and medical workers.
Abstract: Supervisory Committee Dr. Elizabeth Vibert, (Department of History) Supervisor Dr. Lynne Marks, (Department of History) Departmental Member This paper discusses the means by which some British women created professional roles for themselves out of their philanthropic work in India between 1880 and 1900. I examine the development of these roles in the missionary and secular philanthropic communities and how these women used periodicals as a space to implicitly demonstrate their competence and explicitly argue for their status as educators and medical workers. Colonial India provided a particular context of imperial ideals and gendered realities: Indian women were believed to be particularly deprived of learning, medical care and ―civilisation‖ by custom and culture, and Englishwomen could call on the rhetoric of imperial duty to legitimise their care of these disadvantaged women. I argue that India provided the means for British women to demonstrate their capabilities and to involve themselves in the ongoing nineteenth-century project to incorporate women into previously masculine professional societies.

16 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Jabbari as discussed by the authors argues for a shared discourse of modernity shared between early twentieth-century Iranian and Indian intellectuals, and examines how these intellectuals made use of premodern materials for their modernizing projects, and how nationalism shaped this process.
Abstract: This article makes an argument for literary modernity as a shared discourse produced through scholarly exchange between Iranians and Indians reworking their shared Persianate literary heritage, considering literary history as an important and perhaps overlooked site for the production of literary modernity. Arguing for a verbal as well as textual discourse of modernity shared between early twentieth-century Iranian and Indian intellectuals, Jabbari examines how these intellectuals made use of premodern materials for their modernizing projects, and how nationalism shaped this process. Four aspects of modern literary history writing receive particular focus here: engagement with the tazkirah tradition, inclusion of extraliterary national figures alongside poets, use of a shared set of references and sources, and new sexual aesthetics that break with the homoerotic Persianate past.

14 citations

Book
12 Nov 2020
TL;DR: McQuade as mentioned in this paper traces the emerging and novel legal category of "the terrorist" in early twentieth-century colonial law, and examines the first international law to target global terrorism in the 1930s, concluding that the idea of terrorism emerged as a deliberate strategy by officials seeking to depoliticize the actions of anti-colonial revolutionaries.
Abstract: Using India as a case study, Joseph McQuade demonstrates how the modern concept of terrorism was shaped by colonial emergency laws dating back into the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Beginning with the 'thugs', 'pirates', and 'fanatics' of the nineteenth century, McQuade traces the emerging and novel legal category of 'the terrorist' in early twentieth-century colonial law, ending with an examination of the first international law to target global terrorism in the 1930s. Drawing on a wide range of archival research and a detailed empirical study of evolving emergency laws in British India, he argues that the idea of terrorism emerged as a deliberate strategy by officials seeking to depoliticize the actions of anti-colonial revolutionaries, and that many of the ideas embedded in this colonial legislation continue to shape contemporary understandings of terrorism today.

14 citations