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Journal Article

The habitual criminal

01 Oct 1914-The Eugenics Review (Oliver and Boyd)-Vol. 6, Iss: 3, pp 204-218
TL;DR: No wonder you activities are, reading will be always needed, it is not only to fulfil the duties that you need to finish in deadline time, but also to encourage your mind and thoughts.
Abstract: No wonder you activities are, reading will be always needed. It is not only to fulfil the duties that you need to finish in deadline time. Reading will encourage your mind and thoughts. Of course, reading will greatly develop your experiences about everything. Reading habitual criminal is also a way as one of the collective books that gives many advantages. The advantages are not only for you, but for the other peoples with those meaningful benefits.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Longitudinal research involves study, over time, of a group of people, or of samples from the same population, using records, interviews, or both as discussed by the authors, which are especially useful.
Abstract: Longitudinal research involves study, over time, of a group of people, or of samples from the same population, using records, interviews, or both. Studies which extend over a long period, which are prospective, and which include interviews with the subjects are especially useful. The longitudinal method has been used to investigate criminal careers, especially the incidence and prevalence of official delinquency at different ages, the peak age for convictions, the relationship between juvenile delinquency and adult crime, and offense specialization. It has also been used to predict the onset of convictions, recidivism, and the ending of criminal careers; to study the effects of penal treatments and other events such as marriage on delinquency; and to investigate the transmission of criminality from one generation to the next. Longitudinal and cross-sectional methods each have a part to play in research into crime and delinquency and each has its advantages and disadvantages. Major methodological questions...

122 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Robert S. Albert1
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors show how the family position of gifted children can put them in alignment with selected family experiences, socialization, and motivations that help prepare them for particular careers; secondly, they show that often an unanticipated event such as the death of older siblings and/or a parent is not necessarily an impediment to this growth but can be an opportunity and a challenge to healthy ego development.
Abstract: There are two basic transformations in the achievement of eminence. The first is that of intellectual giftedness to creative giftedness (Albert, 1979); the second, even more important, is the transformation of this intelligent creativeness into a combination of talent, drive, and values that &dquo;succeed.&dquo; The transformation of early giftedness into adult eminence is one of the most enthralling and secretive processes of human development. Because its occurrence is relatively difficult to predict, it does not mean one should appeal to shopworn explanations such as &dquo;luck,&dquo; &dquo;breaks,&dquo; &dquo;knowing the right people,&dquo; &dquo;genius,&dquo; or other cliche. The attainment of eminence, although difficult to predict, is not without rational, developmental aspects (Albert, 1975). In this paper I wish to show how the family position of gifted children can put them in alignment with selected family experiences, socialization, and motivations that help prepare them for particular careers; secondly, I wish to show that often an unanticipated event such as the death of older siblings and/or a parent is not necessarily an impediment to this growth but can be an opportunity and a challenge to healthy ego development. The means and the direction in which these traumatic experiences influence

111 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A cluster of dangerous offender laws B ~L which were recently introduced into a number of English-speaking societies are discussed in this article. But the authors do not discuss the legal aspects of these laws.
Abstract: HAT IS the significance of the cluster of dangerous offender laws B ~L which were recently introduced into a number of English-speaking societies? These include the Victorian State Sentencing (Amendment) Act 1993 and the Community Protection Act 1990; the Washington State Sexual Predator Law 1989; the Canadian federal legislation of 1993 the Corrections and Conditional Release Act; and the New Zealand Criminal Justice Amendment Act 1993. The laws themselves are united around the following common themes:’ those judged to be ’dangerous’ must be (i) repeat violent/sexual offenders and (ii) be thought likely to commit such crimes again in the future as, for example, in the justification for the Canadian legislation: ’in order for the

26 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
John Pratt1
TL;DR: For much of the twentieth century the punishment of offenders in modern society came to be administered on a scientific, rational basis with policy driven largely by expert knowledge as mentioned in this paper, and the anonymity of the prison, as a place for reflection and rehabilitation, steadily replaced the pre-modern drama and spectacle of punishment to the human body.
Abstract: For much of the twentieth century the punishment of offenders in modern society came to be administered on a scientific, rational basis with policy driven largely by expert knowledge. The anonymity of the prison, as a place for reflection and rehabilitation, steadily replaced the pre-modern drama and spectacle of punishment to the human body. Recently, though, some modern societies (particularly those in the Anglophone world) have seen recourse to more expressive and severe penalties, driven more by public opinion than by expert knowledge. Other modern societies, however (particularly the Scandinavian countries) remain largely immune to these trends. This article outlines and explores these contrasting trends and developments and uses Norbert Elias's work on the civilizing process to explain them.

21 citations

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What are the benefits of reading with a cop?

The provided paper does not mention anything about reading with a cop or the benefits of such an activity. The paper discusses the benefits of reading in general.