scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Book

The Hebrew and Aramaic Lexicon of the Old Testament

TL;DR: The first volume of the English version of this classic reference tool for Bible scholars was published in 1994, and the subsequent publication of the other volumes has made it the standard modern English dictionary for Biblical Hebrew as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: The first volume of the English version of this classic reference tool for Bible scholars was published in 1994, and the subsequent publication of the other volumes has made it the standard modern English dictionary for Biblical Hebrew. It is based on the third edition of the Lexicon of Ludwig Koehler and Walter Baumgartner, which has been widely acclaimed as the most up-to-date complete dictionary for the Old Testament and related literature. This complete and unabridged translation has been prepared by Richardson with the co-operation of an international team of Hebrew and Old Testament scholars. Some slight modifications have been introduced to make it more useful to readers in the English speaking world. The appearance of this fifth and final volume means that the complete vocabulary of the Hebrew Bible, including those parts of books which are written in Aramaic, is now available. By extension it also includes those variants from the different textual traditions (Oriental, Samaritan, Septuagint, Ben Sira, Qumran, etc.), as well as parallel expressions in other ancient non-Biblical documents. It combines scholarly thoroughness with easy accessibility, and so the dictionary meets the needs of a wide range of users. The enormous advances that have taken place in the field of Semitic linguistics since the days of the older dictionaries of Classical Hebrew are here well documented and assessed, as well as the often detailed discussions in modern Bible commentaries of words where the meaning is particularly difficult. But the alphabetical ordering of entries rather than the traditional arrangement of words according to their roots maintains a user friendly face, which is particularly helpful to the beginning student, and will also save the advanced user much time. Included in this last volume is an extensive bibliography to cover all the secondary sources to which the original authors made reference. It is hoped that this will be particulary useful, especially when used in combination with the CD-rom version of the Dictionary.
Citations
More filters
01 Feb 2019
TL;DR: In this paper, a literary study of the female-male pair in the non-P creation narrative (Gen 2:4a-3:24) is presented, which develops the notion that the human partnership of the Eden narrative foreshadows the cooperative work of diverse humanity in the task of serving and keeping the earth.
Abstract: This thesis is a literary study of the female-male pair in the non-P creation narrative (Gen 2:4a–3:24). It develops the notion that the human partnership of the Eden narrative foreshadows the cooperative work of diverse humanity in the task of serving and keeping the earth.

65 citations

01 Jan 2011
TL;DR: In this article, the authors report the results of a linguistic and theological investigation of the "one-flesh" marriage union concept introduced in Genesis 2:24, and the history of its reception throughout the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament Scriptures, with special focus on its New Testament echoes in Mat. 19, Mar. 10, 1Co. 6 and Eph. 5.
Abstract: This thesis reports the results of a linguistic and theological investigation of the “one flesh” marriage union concept introduced in Genesis 2:24, and the history of its reception throughout the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament Scriptures, with special focus on its New Testament echoes in Mat. 19, Mar. 10, 1Co. 6 and Eph. 5. The aim was to discover whether this concept provides a fundamental, harmonious foundation for a biblical theology of marriage, and whether the “one flesh” union is, at least subliminally, present in the major marriage (and divorce) passages of the Scriptures. Methods employed include, initially, detailed exegesis of Gen. 2:24, giving attention to linguistic and literary features of the passage in context. Reception history was then used to identify the primary passages in both the Hebrew Bible and New Testament impacted by the Gen. 2:24 “one flesh” marriage concept. These in turn were also subjected to detailed exegesis. The combined data emerging from the study of these passages was then examined from the perspective of biblical theology to determine whether a somewhat unified and harmonious biblical theology of the “one flesh” union can be reasonably constructed. The thesis found that the “one flesh” union concept serves as the foundation for the biblical pattern of an ideal marriage. In addition, the “one flesh” union concept serves as a major foundation for several Hebrew Bible and New Testament passages outlining the ideal relationship between Yahweh and his people. Finally, the thesis concludes by presenting a new biblical framework for marriage, divorce and remarriage which deals in a fresh way with theological implications of concubinage, and issues of possible “biblical” grounds for permissible divorce and remarriage.

65 citations

Eric W. Baker1
01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: The ESCHATOLOGICAL ROLE OF the JERUSALEM TEMPLE: An EXAMINATION of JEWISH WRITINGS DATING from 586 BCE to 70 CE.
Abstract: THE ESCHATOLOGICAL ROLE OF THE JERUSALEM TEMPLE: AN EXAMINATION OF JEWISH WRITINGS DATING FROM 586 BCE TO 70 CE

58 citations

Book
Saul M. Olyan1
01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: In this article, the case of Qumran is considered and the Utopian vision of disability in the prophet's Utopians is discussed, with a focus on the relationship between the two concepts of "beauty and ugliness".
Abstract: Introduction 1. Constructions of beauty and ugliness 2. Physical disabilities classified as 'defects' 3. Physical disabilities not classified as 'defects' 4. Mental disability 5. Disability in the prophetic Utopian vision 6. Non-somatic parallels to bodily wholeness and 'defect' 7. Exegetical perpetuations, elaborations and transformations: the case of Qumran 8. Conclusion.

55 citations