scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Journal ArticleDOI

The History of Love, the Contemporary Reader, and the Transmission of Holocaust Memory

01 Dec 2009-Journal of Modern Literature (Indiana University Press)-Vol. 33, Iss: 1, pp 43-56
TL;DR: Nicole Krauss's The History of Love (2005) as discussed by the authors represents, without the privilege of direct memory, a Holocaust past and a postmodern present, serving as witness to the end of a generation of Holocaust memoirs and to a future of Holocaust literature where imagination and history are interpolated.
Abstract: Nicole Krauss’s The History of Love (2005) represents, without the privilege of direct memory, a Holocaust past and a postmodern present. Indeed, the representation of the Holocaust in this novel serves as witness to the end of a generation of Holocaust memoirs and to a future of Holocaust literature where imagination and history are interpolated. This article reviews the range and periodicity of American Holocaust fiction, examines the presence of the Holocaust in The History of Love, and considers strategies unique to Krauss’s voice as a third generation Holocaust writer. Such an examination explores the novel’s ambivalent position, one that is built on a fraught triumvirate: history, a wary critical community, and a contemporary audience longing for an imaginative connection between themselves and the historical event.
Citations
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI

19 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2018
TL;DR: The authors examines contemporary US-American novels which juxtapose several collective traumatic memories and discusses which position the novels take up in the discourses on the incomparability or hierarchization of traumas.
Abstract: The thesis examines contemporary US-American novels which juxtapose several collective traumatic memories. Close readings of the novels "What You Owe Me" by Bebe Moore Campbell (2001), "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close" by Jonathan Safran Foer (2006), "Let the Great World Spin" by Colum McCann (2009), and "Great House" by Nicole Krauss (2010) carve out how different collective historical traumas such as 9/11, the Vietnam War, the Holocaust, and slavery are depicted within the same novel and to what effect the juxtaposition is undertaken, i.e. if commonalities or differences are suggested or if the outcome is left open. The thesis also discusses which position the novels take up in the discourses on the incomparability or hierarchization of traumas. As analytical tools, the thesis applies not only classic trauma studies approaches, as they were established by Cathy Caruth, but also concepts which hitherto have not been applied to study trauma fiction, i.e. network theory and psychogeography, thereby pointing out benefits and limits of the classic trauma discourse.

16 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

10 citations

References
More filters
Book
01 Jan 2000
TL;DR: This reading book is your chosen book to accompany you when in your free time, in your lonely, and can help you to heal the lonely and get or add the inspirations to be more inoperative.
Abstract: The traumatic realism the demands of holocaust representation that we provide for you will be ultimate to give preference. This reading book is your chosen book to accompany you when in your free time, in your lonely. This kind of book can help you to heal the lonely and get or add the inspirations to be more inoperative. Yeah, book as the widow of the world can be very inspiring manners. As here, this book is also created by an inspiring author that can make influences of you to do more.

269 citations

Book
01 Jan 1975
TL;DR: The interviews, essays and articles collected in this book span a quarter of a century of Philip Roth's distinguished career and reveal a preoccupation with the relationship between the written and the unwritten world.
Abstract: The interviews, essays and articles collected in this book span a quarter of a century of Philip Roth's distinguished career and 'reveal a preoccupation with the relationship between the written and the unwritten world.' Here is Roth on himself and his work and the controversies it's engendered. Here too are Roth's writings on the Eastern European writers he has always championed; and on baseball, American fiction, and American Jews. The essential collection of nonfiction by a true master, Reading Myself and Others features his long interview with the Paris Review.

171 citations

Book
01 Jan 1971
TL;DR: In Bluebeard's Castle as mentioned in this paper, Steiner's discussion of the break with the traditional literary past (Jewish, Christian, Greek, and Latin) is illuminating and attractively undogmatic.
Abstract: "Four impressive lectures about the culture of recent times (from the French Revolution) and the conceivable culture of times to come. Mr. Steiner's discussion of the break with the traditional literary past (Jewish, Christian, Greek, and Latin) is illuminating and attractively undogmatic. He writes as a man sharing ideas, and his original notions, though scarcely cheerful, have the bracing effect that first-rate thinking always has." -New Yorker "In Bluebeard's Castle is a brief and brilliant book. An intellectual tour de force, it is also a book that should generate a profound excitement and promote a profound unease...like the great culturalists of the past. Steiner uses a dense and plural learning to assess his topic: his book has the outstanding quality of being not simply a reflection on culture, but an embodiment of certain contemporary resources within it. The result is one of the most important books I have read for a very long time."-New Society

166 citations

Book
01 Jan 1975
TL;DR: The Holocaust and the literary imagination as mentioned in this paper is a pioneering work of criticism for it impels us, readers and writers alike, to inquire after the basic paradox: how can literature delight and transfix or warn and modify a humanity from whom nothing is hidden, nothing prohibited, for which nothing is shocking or unreal.
Abstract: "The immense service that Langer's careful, thoughtful, immensely intelligent and restrained study renders is that the esthetics of atrocity cease to be an exclusive domain of the victims. Many of his writers are not Jewish and several were not imprisoned or interned, and yet all of them have been riven by the death-camp universe. The atrocity of that time and the atrocities that have succeeded Auschwitz represent a continuity that may almost be called a new tradition, one in which the phantasmagoric and horrific is real and the gentle and generous a prodigy to be remarked with amazement. "The Holocaust and the literary Imagination is a pioneering work of criticism for it impels us, readers and writers alike, to inquire after the basic paradox: how can literature delight and transfix or warn and modify a humanity from whom nothing is hidden, nothing prohibited, for whom nothing is shocking or unreal." --Arthur A. Cohen, New York Times Book Review.

162 citations

Book ChapterDOI
TL;DR: Boltanski and Attie as discussed by the authors examined the discourses of postmemory in the work of several artists who have attempted to find the aesthetic shapes that convey the mixture of ambivalence and desire, mourning and recollection, presence and absence that characterize postmemory.
Abstract: For Holocaust survivors who have been separated and exiled from a ravaged world, memory is necessarily an act not only of recall but also of mourning, mourning often inflected by anger, rage, and despair. Children of survivors live at a further temporal and spatial remove from the decimated world of their parents. Still, the power of mourning and memory, and the depth of the rift dividing their parents' lives, impart to them something that is akin to memory. I have chosen to call this secondary, or second-generation, memory "postmemory." Postmemory is a powerful form of memory precisely because its connection to its object or source is mediated not through recollection but through an imaginative investment and creation. Postmemory characterizes the experience of those who grow up dominated by narratives that preceded their birth, whose own belated stories are evacuated by the stories of the previous generation, shaped by traumatic events that can be neither fully understood nor re-created. Much of contemporary European and American philosophy, literature, and art is influenced by Holocaust postmemory. This article examines the discourses of postmemory in the work of several artists who have attempted to find the aesthetic shapes that convey the mixture of ambivalence and desire, mourning and recollection, presence and absence that characterize postmemory. Because photographs are Poetics Today 17:4 (Winter 1996) Copyright ? 1996 by the Porter Institute for Poetics and Semiotics. This content downloaded from 157.55.39.206 on Sat, 17 Dec 2016 05:26:15 UTC All use subject to http://about.jstor.org/terms 660 Poetics Today 17:4 often read as traces, material connections to a lost past, and because many photographic images have survived even though their subjects did not, photography provides a particularly powerful medium of postmemory. The "Tower of Faces" in the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum is such a postmemorial form created for future generations who, through the ordinary domestic photograph and the affiliative gazes it constructs, are included among the children and grandchildren of the people depicted in the images. The artists Christian Boltanski (French) and Shimon Attie (American) both use archival photographs -of Jewish schoolchildren and of the Jewish quarter in Berlin, respectively--as the basis for a new composite memorial aesthetic. All three texts represent the perspective of children of survivors: they need both to rebuild and to mourn the lost world

155 citations