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Journal ArticleDOI

The History of Theophylact Simocatta

01 Jan 1987-Classical World (JSTOR)-Vol. 80, Iss: 4, pp 324
About: This article is published in Classical World.The article was published on 1987-01-01. It has received 131 citations till now.
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Sep 2008

26 citations

Book ChapterDOI
08 Jan 2009

26 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2009
TL;DR: Gregory's colophon on the Gospels as mentioned in this paper, written in 1066, offers us insight into an Armenian monastery on Byzantine territory, where the copyist of the Gospel Book moved to Sebasteia after 1021, when Basil II (976-1025) granted the city to Sennacherim-John Artsruni, in exchange for his native kingdom of Vaspurakan.
Abstract: I, Gregory, the priest over the enfeebled people of the Armenians, at the time of our persecutions by the nation of the Ishmaelites who had appeared from eastern lands [wrote this colophon on the Gospels]. We came from Mount Ararat, from the village, which is called Arkuri, following our God-loving king Sennacherim, to dwell in this city of Sebasteia where the Forty Martyrs shed their blood in the battle with bitter-blowing wind and ice-cold water. And there, after five years my many talented and greatly honoured father, the priest Anania passed away, in the royal city of Constantinople … And [so] we remained [in Sebasteia], two brothers, George and Gregory …’ This colophon, written in 1066, offers us insight into an Armenian monastery on Byzantine territory. Gregory, the copyist of the Gospel Book, moved to Sebasteia after 1021, when Basil II (976–1025) granted the city to Sennacherim-John Artsruni, in exchange for his native kingdom of Vaspurakan (see above, p. 360). Gregory’s colophon is his testament, bequeathing his most valuable possession, the Gospels, to his spiritual son. The colophon was written at a difficult period for Byzantine Asia Minor. Although primarily concerned with spiritual themes, Gregory mentions ‘our persecutions by the nation of the Ishmaelites’. The question arises: who were these ‘Ishmaelites’?

26 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Dec 2005
TL;DR: The use of force in evangelisation during the early Middle Ages is the Christianisation of the Saxons, which came to be intimately related to their conquest during the reign of Charlemagne as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: By the early fifth century Western Roman Empire was theoretically Christian. There were still pagan intellectuals among the upper classes, especially among the lower classes of the countryside, but also among those who lived in the cities, including Rome itself, who continued to perform rituals which were condemned as idolatrous by the church. Nor are the Burgundians and the Franks the only peoples for whom Christianisation entailed hesitation between Arianism and Catholicism. Politics would play a major role in the ensuing Christianisation of the English, with powerful rulers putting pressure on their weaker neighbours, sponsoring them in baptism, and supporting missions to their kingdoms. The chief example of the use of force in evangelisation during the early Middle Ages is the Christianisation of the Saxons, which came to be intimately related to their conquest during the reign of Charlemagne.

26 citations

Book Chapter
01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: Anastasius, the Roman Empire in the beginning of the sixth century, inherited, and promoted, religious divisions that were to cast a long shadow over the Christian Roman or Byzantine Empire.
Abstract: Anastasius, the Roman Empire in the beginning of the sixth century, inherited, and promoted, religious divisions that were to cast a long shadow over the Christian Roman or Byzantine Empire. Accounts of the second half of Anastasius' reign indicate increasing popular unrest, ostensibly owing to the religious policy of the emperor. At the beginning of the century, the long peace with Persia, the traditional enemy of the Roman Empire, and indeed of its predecessors, came to an end. Anastasius was succeeded by Justin I, who had risen through the ranks to become Count of the Excubitors. Justinian's reign was a long one, lasting until 565, thirty-eight years in all, or forty-seven if one includes the period as the power behind Justin's throne. The 'grand design' view of Justinian's reign sees all his actions as the deliberate restoration of the ancient Roman Empire, though a Roman Empire raised to new heights of glory as a Christian Empire confessing the Orthodox faith.

25 citations