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Journal ArticleDOI

The History of Theophylact Simocatta

01 Jan 1987-Classical World (JSTOR)-Vol. 80, Iss: 4, pp 324
About: This article is published in Classical World.The article was published on 1987-01-01. It has received 131 citations till now.
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: The situation of Italy during the period now often called “late antiquity’ was not always a happy one as mentioned in this paper, the economy was in transition: the number of occupied rural sites began to fall in the third or even the second century, agri deserti were becoming a common feature of the landscape, and towns were losing population.
Abstract: The situation of Italy during the period now often called “late antiquity’ was not always a happy one. The economy was in transition: The number of occupied rural sites began to fall in the third or even the second century, agri deserti were becoming a common feature of the landscape, and towns were losing population. The construction of urban public buildings, one of the distinguishing characteristics of classical civilisation, dried up, and in the early sixth century it was recognised that the population of Rome was much smaller than it had been. As Cassiodorus, a man with long experience in the civil service, wrote: “The vast numbers of the people of the city of Rome in old times are evidenced by the extensive provinces from which their food supply was drawn, as well as by the wide circuit of their walls, the massive structure of their amphitheatre, the marvellous bigness of their public baths, and the enormous multitude of mills, which could only have been made for use, not for ornament.’ The role Italy played in the economic life of the Roman Empire diminished, imported African pottery having come to dominate the Italian market as early as the second century, and its political fortunes were similar. While Rome remained for centuries the capital of a mighty empire, there were very few Italian emperors after the first century, and the advent of Constantinople as the “second Rome’ from the time of Constantine early in the fourth century saw the eastern and wealthier portion of the Empire become independent.

65 citations

Book
28 Jun 2012
TL;DR: Crone's book as discussed by the authors describes a complex of religious ideas that, however varied in space and unstable over time, has demonstrated a remarkable persistence in Iran across a period of two millennia.
Abstract: Patricia Crone's book is about the Iranian response to the Muslim penetration of the Iranian countryside, the revolts subsequently triggered there and the religious communities that these revolts revealed. The book also describes a complex of religious ideas that, however varied in space and unstable over time, has demonstrated a remarkable persistence in Iran across a period of two millennia. The central thesis is that this complex of ideas has been endemic to the mountain population of Iran and occasionally become epidemic with major consequences for the country, most strikingly in the revolts examined here and in the rise of the Safavids who imposed Shi'ism on Iran. This learned and engaging book by one of the most influential scholars of early Islamic history casts entirely new light on the nature of religion in pre-Islamic Iran and on the persistence of Iranian religious beliefs both outside and inside Islam after the Arab conquest.

64 citations

Book ChapterDOI
11 Sep 2008

64 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Dec 2005
TL;DR: The era of Leovigild marks the apogee of the Visigothic kingdom of Toledo in its Arian phase as discussed by the authors, where the Sueve kingdom was driven back to its original limits and reduced in its autonomy by the interference of the Romano-imperial authorities, who after this established new and powerful interests in Hispania.
Abstract: At the beginning of the fifth century the Sueves had remained within the western limits of the province of Gallaecia, but after the departure of the Vandals they initiated a process of expansion to increase their territory. In short, ten years after their initiation, the Sueve wars had resulted in the Sueve kingdom being driven back to its original limits and reduced in its autonomy by the interference, not of the Romano-imperial authorities, but of the Visigoths, who after this established new and powerful interests in Hispania. The advent of Euric, the new Visigothic monarch of Toulouse, was to mark a change in Visigoth-Sueve relations. The era of Leovigild marks the apogee of the Visigothic kingdom of Toledo in its Arian phase. In the first years of his reign Leovigild focussed his attention on the south of the peninsula, those regions where Visigothic dominion had been endangered as a consequence of the civil war and the Byzantine occupation.

60 citations

01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: The Holy Chapel of the palace of Bukoleon as mentioned in this paper was one of the most beautiful and noble chapels in the world, and it contained two pieces of the True Cross as large as the leg of a man and the iron lance with which Our Lord had his side pierced, and two of the nails which were driven through his hands and feet; and one found there in a crystal phial quite a little of his blood and the tunic which he wore [...] when they led him to Mount Calvary.
Abstract: “When the city was captured [...] and the palaces were taken over, [...] they found in them riches more than a great deal. [...] And the palace of Bukoleon was very rich [...] and in it there were fully thirty chapels, great and small, and there was one of them which was called the Holy Chapel, which was so rich and noble that there was not a hinge nor a band nor any other part [...] that was not all of silver, and there was no column that was not of jasper or porphyry or some other rich precious stone. [And] within this chapel were found many rich relics: [...] two pieces of the True Cross as large as the leg of a man [...], and the iron of the lance with which Our Lord had his side pierced, and two of the nails which were driven through his hands and feet; and one found there in a crystal phial quite a little of his blood and [...] the tunic which he wore [...] when they led him to Mount Calvary. And one found there also the blessed crown with which he was crowned [...] and the robe of Our Lady and so many other rich relics that I could not recount them to you [...].”1

57 citations