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Journal ArticleDOI

The History of Theophylact Simocatta

01 Jan 1987-Classical World (JSTOR)-Vol. 80, Iss: 4, pp 324
About: This article is published in Classical World.The article was published on 1987-01-01. It has received 131 citations till now.
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe the life of the Byzantine church in the seventh century emerging from the 102 canons of the Quinisext Synod, called by the emperor Justinian II in 692.
Abstract: At the beginning of the seventh century, the Byzantine Empire was part of a political configuration focussed on the Mediterranean world, which had been familiar for centuries and was characterised by two factors, one external and the other internal. The administration of the Byzantine Empire, both civil and military, was essentially what had emerged from the reforms of Diocletian and Constantine in the late third and early fourth centuries. The authors describe the life of the Byzantine church in the seventh century emerging from the 102 canons of the Quinisext Synod, called by the emperor Justinian II in 692.The end of the seventh century saw the Byzantine Empire still in a process of transition and redefinition: the Arab threat to Constantinople was to continue well into the eighth century, and Iconoclasm, which is seen as a further stage in the Byzantine Empire's search for its identity and ways of expressing this in the aftermath of crisis of the seventh century.

21 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: In the fifth century, the borders of the Roman Empire in the West, by then distinct from the empire in the East which was governed from Constantinople, stood reasonably firm as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Throughout the political history of western Europe, there have been few periods of such dramatic change as the fifth century. In 400 the borders of the Roman Empire in the West, by then distinct from the Empire in the East which was governed from Constantinople, stood reasonably firm. They encompassed all of Europe south of the Antonine Wall in Britain and the Rhine and the Danube rivers on the continent, extending eastwards of the confluence of the latter river with the Drava, as well as a band of territory along the African coast which extended two thirds of the way from the Straits of Gibraltar to the Nile. But within a hundred years this mighty entity had ceased to east. North Africa had been occupied by groups known as Vandals and Alans, Spain by Visigoths and Sueves, and Gaul by Visigoths, Franks and Burgundians. The Romans had withdrawn from Britain early in the century, leaving it exposed to attacks from the Irish, Picts and Anglo-Saxons, while in Italy the last emperor, Romulus Augustulus, was deposed in 476 by a military commander, Odovacer. The supplanter of Romulus was himself deposed and murdered in 493 by Theoderic the Ostrogoth, who established a powerful kingdom based on Italy. While the Empire had weathered the storms of the fifth century largely unscathed in the East, in the West it had simply ceased to exist. Western Europe, one might be excused for thinking, had moved decisively into a post-Roman period, and the Middle Ages had begun.

21 citations

Book ChapterDOI
08 Dec 2005

19 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors used the existence of extensive issues of silver drachms struck by Hormizd IV, Khusrau II and Varhran VI during the period 590-1 and 627-8, alongside a re-examination of the sources, enables the date to be corrected to soon after 27 June (New Year) 590.
Abstract: It is most unusual for a detailed literary account of political events to have survived which enables modern scholars to study the course of Sasanian history almost day by day. Interpretation of the History of Theophylact Simocatta has led to the mis-dating of Khusrau II's accession to the throne to 15 February 590. The existence of extensive issues of silver drachms struck by Hormizd IV, Khusrau II and Varhran VI during the period 590–1 and of Khusrau II in 627–8, alongside a re-examination of the sources, enables the date to be corrected to soon after 27 June (New Year) 590.

19 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Dec 2005
TL;DR: The end of Rome's political control certainly did not mark the end of the Roman era: Roman roots had burrowed too deeply in almost every other facet of European life, economic, social, intellectual, legal, religious, linguistic and artistic.
Abstract: The end of Rome's political control certainly did not mark the end of the Roman era: Roman roots had burrowed too deeply. In almost every other facet of European life, economic, social, intellectual, legal, religious, linguistic and artistic, much of the Roman imprint held firm, sometimes for centuries after the political bonds were loosed. The reign of the emperor Commodus is taken as the signpost towards the end of Rome's Golden Age. There had always been a strong religious element in Roman rule, and it deepened as the Empire aged. The Roman world would deliver to the European Middle Ages not only Christianity's holy book, its Bible, but also a huge body of systematic theology. The advent of the barbarians could actually enhance the status of the Roman aristocracy. Late Roman ideas of law and the ways that it regulates the ownership of property were also passed directly into the early Middle Ages in the West.

18 citations