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Journal ArticleDOI

The History of Theophylact Simocatta

01 Jan 1987-Classical World (JSTOR)-Vol. 80, Iss: 4, pp 324
About: This article is published in Classical World.The article was published on 1987-01-01. It has received 131 citations till now.
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Dec 2005
TL;DR: In the later third century, when it began to be widely persecuted, the Christian community of believers had already created within the Roman Empire the basic forms of church organisation as discussed by the authors. But the big councils, which were used as arenas for opinions and as a stage for the development of the church, were all held in the Greek East and only superficially concerned themselves with the modest Christianity of the West.
Abstract: By the later third century, when it began to be widely persecuted, the Christian community of believers had already created within the Roman Empire the basic forms of church organisation. The big councils, which were used as arenas for opinions and as a stage for the development of the church, were all held in the Greek East and only superficially concerned themselves with the modest Christianity of the West. The liturgy had its first flowering in the period 500-700 and it grew out of the variety of prayer and church services which had evolved under Byzantine influence. The Acacian and Henotikon schisms were a legacy of the fifth century, in which the papacy was embroiled up to the end of the century. The synod in Rome had a special position because it brought together all the bishops in suburbicarian Italy. The churches in the West were self-assured in their Christian belief and respected Rome as the city of the apostle.

29 citations

Book ChapterDOI
11 Sep 2008

29 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Dec 2005
TL;DR: This paper reviewed some of the principal issues which currently engage the attention of historians working on the barbarians and their place in the processes known cumulatively as the fall of Rome and showed that Britain cannot be viewed separately from the continent, as something of an aberration or special case: the Anglo-Saxons were no more different from the Franks than the Franks were from the Ostrogoths or the Vandals, and maybe less so.
Abstract: This chapter reviews some of the principal issues which currently engage the attention of historians working on the barbarians and their place in the processes known cumulatively as the 'Fall of Rome'. It shows that, contrary to commonly held views, Britain cannot be viewed separately from the continent, as something of an aberration or special case: the Anglo-Saxons were no more different from the Franks than the Franks were from the Ostrogoths or the Vandals, and maybe less so. By 500 AD all the Roman provinces of the West had become barbarian kingdoms: the Franks and Burundians in Gaul, the Ostrogoths in Italy, the Sueves and the Visigoths in Spain, the Vandals in North Africa, the Anglo-Saxons and the Britons in Britain. Romans paid taxes, so becoming a barbarian could bring with it tax exemption. In the post-Roman legal codes the barbarian element of the population was often given legal privilege, one reason to adopt a barbarian ethnic identity.

29 citations

Book ChapterDOI
11 Sep 2008

28 citations