scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Book

The Holocaust as Active Memory: The Past in the Present

23 May 2013-
TL;DR: In this article, the authors highlight the contexts in which such questions are asked, and highlight the catalysts that trigger a change from silence to discussion of the Holocaust and what happens when we talk its invisibility away.
Abstract: The ways in which memories of the Holocaust have been communicated, represented and used have changed dramatically over the years. From such memories being neglected and silenced in most of Europe until the 1970s, each country has subsequently gone through a process of cultural, political and pedagogical awareness-rising. This culminated in the ’Stockholm conference on Holocaust commemoration’ in 2000, which resulted in the constitution of a task force dedicated to transmitting and teaching knowledge and awareness about the Holocaust on a global scale. The silence surrounding private memories of the Holocaust has also been challenged in many families. What are the catalysts that trigger a change from silence to discussion of the Holocaust? What happens when we talk its invisibility away? How are memories of the Holocaust reflected in different social environments? Who asks questions about memories of the Holocaust, and which answers do they find, at which point in time and from which past and present positions related to their societies and to the phenomenon in question? This book highlights the contexts in which such questions are asked. By introducing the concept of ’active memory’, this book contributes to recent developments in memory studies, where memory is increasingly viewed not in isolation but as a dynamic and relational part of human lives. Contents: Introduction: the Holocaust as active memory; Linking religion and family memories of children hidden in Belgian convents during the Holocaust, Suzanne Vromen; Collective trajectory and generational work in families of Jewish displaced persons: epistemological processes in the research situation, Lena Inowlocki; In a double voice: representations of the Holocaust in Polish literature, 1980-2011, Dorota Glowacka; Winners once a year? How Russian-speaking Jews in Germany make sense of WWII and the Holocaust as part of transnational biographic experience, Julia Bernstein; Women’s peace activism and the Holocaust: reversing the hegemonic Holocaust discourse in Israel, Tova Benski and Ruth Katz; ’The history, the papers, let me see it!’ Compensation processes: the second generation between archive truth and family speculations, Nicole L. Immler; From rescue to escape in 1943: on a path to de-victimizing the Danish Jews. Sofie Lene Bak; Finland, the Vernichtungskrieg and the Holocaust, Oula Silvennoinen; Swedish rescue operations during the Second World War: accomplishments and aftermath, Ulf Zander; The social phenomenon of silence, Irene Levin; Index.
Citations
More filters
Book
12 Nov 2015
TL;DR: Memory and Migration in the Shadow of War as mentioned in this paper explores the concept of remembrance within the larger context of migration to show how intergenerational experience of war and trauma transcend both place and nation.
Abstract: In an engaging and original contribution to the field of memory studies, Joy Damousi considers the enduring impact of war on family memory in the Greek diaspora. Focusing on Australia's Greek immigrants in the aftermath of the Second World War and the Greek Civil War, the book explores the concept of remembrance within the larger context of migration to show how intergenerational experience of war and trauma transcend both place and nation. Drawing from the most recent research in memory, trauma and transnationalism, Memory and Migration in the Shadow of War deals with the continuities and discontinuities of war stories, assimilation in modern Australia, politics and activism, child migration and memories of mothers and children in war. Damousi sheds new light on aspects of forgotten memory and silence within families and communities, and in particular the ways in which past experience of violence and tragedy is both negotiated and processed.

16 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that the primacy of the resistance/collaboration paradigm has led not only to simplistic understandings of social behavior in Hitler's Europe, but also made the historiography vulnerable to instrumentalization.
Abstract: This article argues that Europe’s seeming inability to escape from the divisive legacy of World War II is connected to the way in which the war is conceptualized almost everywhere and by almost everyone—not just by the public and politicians, but by professional historians as well. The underlying problem we identify is the dominance of a gendered resistance/collaboration paradigm in the historiography, which has both shaped and been shaped by public understandings of the war. The primacy of the resistance/collaboration paradigm has led not only to simplistic understandings of social behavior in Hitler’s Europe, it has also made the historiography vulnerable to instrumentalization. We do not argue that the concepts of “resistance” and “collaboration” should be discarded, but that they should be incorporated into a modified framework for understanding how people responded daily to Nazi rule. This framework, which we have termed the “social history of politics” model, is based upon three key principles. First, it emphasizes the interconnectedness of the political, the social, the economic and the military spheres in Nazi-controlled Europe. Second, it recognizes that, at a time of total war waged by a regime with totalitarian aspirations, all behavior had the potential to be of political significance. Third, it incorporates gender as a category of analysis in the study of all political, social, military and economic processes in Hitler’s empire.

15 citations

01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: This article examined the ways in which third-generation Holocaust writers, or the grandchildren of Holocaust survivors, approach the subject of their own traumatic history and the intergenerational transmission of trauma.
Abstract: This research examines the ways in which third generation Holocaust writers, or the grandchildren of Holocaust survivors, approach the subject of their own traumatic history and the intergenerational transmission of trauma. Despite the generational divide that separates the third generation from the preceding two generations of Holocaust writers, the trans-generational transmission of trauma continues to preoccupy contemporary narratives. This research discusses the innovative ways that third-generation writers, such as Nicole Krauss, Margot Singer, and Jonathan Safran Foer, use imaginative leaps throughout their writing and how such narrative techniques distinguish them from survivor and second-generation Holocaust representation. The third generation’s narratives of return and recovery stem from their desire to uncover the truth behind their traumatic familial history as well as their fragmented knowledge about this traumatic familial history. This paper refers to the grandchildren of Holocaust survivors’ fragmented knowledge about the horrors of the Holocaust as “lost worlds,” a motif that continues to arise in third-generation Holocaust narratives. Innovative imaginative leaps therefore serve as an attempt to bridge the gap between the third generation’s personal history and their families’ histories. Additionally, the unconventional use of such narrative patterns reflects the third generation’s endeavors to articulate their complicated familial history, a history they themselves may not entirely understand.

4 citations