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Journal ArticleDOI

The Holocaust is present: reenacting the Holocaust, then and now

02 Apr 2020-Holocaust Studies (Routledge)-Vol. 26, Iss: 2, pp 152-180
TL;DR: Reenactment has played a vital, albeit unacknowledged, role in what has been remembered of the Holocaust from the moment the camps were liberated, performative and participatory practices were sei...
Abstract: Reenactment has played a vital, albeit unacknowledged, role in what has been remembered of the Holocaust. From the moment the camps were liberated, performative and participatory practices were sei...
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Phelan as mentioned in this paper, The Politics of Performance, Peggy Phelan. London: Routtedge, 1993. xi + 207 pp., figures, notes, bibliography, index.
Abstract: Unmarked: The Politics of Performance, Peggy Phelan. London: Routtedge, 1993. xi + 207 pp., figures, notes, bibliography, index.

493 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: One of the most popular books now is the remembering to forget holocaust memory through the cameras eye as discussed by the authors, but it is difficult to find the book in the book store around your city.
Abstract: It's not surprisingly when entering this site to get the book. One of the popular books now is the remembering to forget holocaust memory through the cameras eye. You may be confused because you can't find the book in the book store around your city. Commonly, the popular book will be sold quickly. And when you have found the store to buy the book, it will be so hurt when you run out of it. This is why, searching for this popular book in this website will give you benefit. You will not run out of this book.

292 citations

01 Jan 1950

33 citations

References
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Book
25 Aug 1989
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors provide an account of how bodily practices are transmitted in, and as, traditions, and argue that images of the past and recollected knowledge are conveyed and sustained by ritual performances and that performative memory is bodily.
Abstract: In treating memory as a cultural rather than an individual faculty, this book provides an account of how bodily practices are transmitted in, and as, traditions. Most studies of memory as a cultural faculty focus on written, or inscribed transmissions of memories. Paul Connerton, on the other hand, concentrates on bodily (or incorporated) practices, and so questions the currently dominant idea that literary texts may be taken as a metaphor for social practices generally. The author argues that images of the past and recollected knowledge of the past are conveyed and sustained by ritual performances and that performative memory is bodily. Bodily social memory is an essential aspect of social memory, but it is an aspect which has until now been badly neglected. An innovative study, this work should be of interest to researchers into social, political and anthropological thought as well as to graduate and undergraduate students.

3,318 citations

Book
01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: The Archive and the Repertoire as discussed by the authors explores how the archive and the repertoire work together to make political claims, transmit traumatic memory, and forge a new sense of cultural identity.
Abstract: In The Archive and the Repertoire preeminent performance studies scholar Diana Taylor provides a new understanding of the vital role of performance in the Americas. From plays to official events to grassroots protests, performance, she argues, must be taken seriously as a means of storing and transmitting knowledge. Taylor reveals how the repertoire of embodied memory—conveyed in gestures, the spoken word, movement, dance, song, and other performances—offers alternative perspectives to those derived from the written archive and is particularly useful to a reconsideration of historical processes of transnational contact. The Archive and the Repertoire invites a remapping of the Americas based on traditions of embodied practice. Examining various genres of performance including demonstrations by the children of the disappeared in Argentina, the Peruvian theatre group Yuyachkani, and televised astrological readings by Univision personality Walter Mercado, Taylor explores how the archive and the repertoire work together to make political claims, transmit traumatic memory, and forge a new sense of cultural identity. Through her consideration of performances such as Coco Fusco and Guillermo Gomez-Pena’s show Two Undiscovered Amerindians Visit . . . , Taylor illuminates how scenarios of discovery and conquest haunt the Americas, trapping even those who attempt to dismantle them. Meditating on events like those of September 11, 2001 and media representations of them, she examines both the crucial role of performance in contemporary culture and her own role as witness to and participant in hemispheric dramas. The Archive and the Repertoire is a compelling demonstration of the many ways that the study of performance enables a deeper understanding of the past and present, of ourselves and others.

1,727 citations

Book
01 Jan 1946
TL;DR: In this article, R. G. Collingwood considers how the modern idea of history has grown up from the time of Herodotus to the present day, and how history is not contained in books and documents, it lives only as a present interest and pursuit, in the mind of the historian when he criticizes and interprets those documents, and by so doing relives for himself the states of mind into which he inquires'.
Abstract: In this book, published posthumously, R. G. Collingwood considers how the modern idea of history has grown up from the time of Herodotus to the present day. To Collingwood, 'history is not contained in books and documents, it lives only as a present interest and pursuit, in the mind of the historian when he criticizes and interprets those documents, and by so doing relives for himself the states of mind into which he inquires'.

1,692 citations

Book
19 Feb 1993
TL;DR: Phelan's critical analysis of this anthology of performance foregrounds issues of corporeality, racial and sexual difference, reproductive rights and AIDS as discussed by the authors, focusing on the works of Mapplethorpe, Schor, Sherman, Rainer, Livingston and Stoppard.
Abstract: Phelan's critical analysis of this anthology of performance foregrounds issues of corporeality, racial and sexual difference, reproductive rights and AIDS. Cultural practices of photography, film, theatre, political protest and performance art are discussed in relation to pshycoanalytic and feminist theories. Emphasis is placed on the works of Mapplethorpe, Schor, Sherman, Rainer, Livingston and Stoppard. Includes name and theme index. 337 bibl. ref.

1,410 citations

Book
24 Jul 2012
TL;DR: Artificial Hells as mentioned in this paper is the first historical and theoretical overview of socially engaged participatory art and examines key moments in the development of the participatory aesthetic, in both Europe and America.
Abstract: For over a decade, conceptual and performance art has been dominated by participatory art. Its champions, such as French curator Nicolas Bourriaud (who invented the term "relational aesthetics" to describe it) and American art historian Grant Kester, believe that by encouraging an audience to join in, the artist can promote new emancipatory social relations. Artificial Hells is the first historical and theoretical overview of socially engaged participatory art. The book follows the trajectory of twentieth-century art and examines key moments in the development of the participatory aesthetic, in both Europe and America. This itinerary takes in Futurism, Dada, Situationism, Czechoslovakian Happenings, and Argentinean Conceptualism, and concludes with contemporary artists such as Thomas Hirschhorn, Tania Bruguera and Jeremy Deller. Since her controversial essay in Artforum in 2006, Claire Bishop has been one of the few to expose the political and aesthetic limitations of this work. In Artificial Hells she not only scrutinizes the claims for democracy and emancipation that the artists and critics make for the work, but also questions the turn to ethical (rather than artistic) criteria invited by such participatory and collaborative art.

1,022 citations