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Journal ArticleDOI

The incentive effects of different government subsidy policies on green buildings

01 Jan 2021-Renewable & Sustainable Energy Reviews (Pergamon)-Vol. 135, pp 110123
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examined the incentive effects of government subsidy policies to promote the development of green buildings and found that the incentive effect of subsidies on consumers was superior to that of subsidy on developers, revealing the increasingly important role of consumer behavior.
Abstract: This study aimed to examine the incentive effects of government subsidy policies to promote the development of green buildings. In particular, four different designs of subsidy policy were investigated: a) subsidies paid to developers alone, b) subsidies paid to consumers alone, c) subsidies paid to both, and d) no subsidy. Two-stage models involving developers, consumers, and the government were constructed to examine the effects of the different subsidy policies. In the models, developers supply and sell buildings with different green effort levels; consumers purchase the buildings according to their green preferences. The results of the numerical analysis indicated that the subsidies were a positive incentive for the development of green buildings. Simultaneously subsidizing both developers and consumers resulted in the greatest profits for developers and the highest social welfare. The incentive effect of subsidies on consumers was superior to that of subsidies on developers, revealing the increasingly important role of consumer behavior in the green building market. Furthermore, the incentive effects of the four subsidy policies were significantly enhanced with the improvement of consumers' green preferences and the unit potential benefit for developers.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , an in-depth qualitative analysis is performed to force out the challenges that Europe faces in decarbonizing the heating sector from the aspects, such as using clean energy resources, effective heat energy conversion and management approaches.
Abstract: Europe anchored aspiring targets in achieving climate neutrality and this motivates the research communities to analyze, investigate and frame strategies to achieve the goals in the stipulated timeframe. This study reviews the effective decarbonization strategies in the context of Europe's climate neutral vision. Initially, the study analyzes the reasons for ever-increasing emissions and investigates the perception of decarbonization in line with various influencing factors such as population size, economic growth, energy intensity, emission intensity, innovation, affordability and time. Subsequently, an in-depth qualitative analysis is performed to force out the challenges that Europe faces in decarbonizing the heating sector from the aspects, such as using clean energy resources, effective heat energy conversion and management approaches. Sustainable approaches and practices are proposed to mitigate carbonization and to promote carbon sink in line with the major problems associated with various sectors such as building, energy, industry and transportation sector. Furthermore, the roles of digitalization in decarbonization are explored and the inherent challenges are also discussed. This study also reviews various decarbonization policies that can direct the governments' action to effectively make a transition towards a climate-neutral society. The key findings highlight that solar energy utilization in small-scale is relatively not preferable for heat energy conversion in Europe due to climatic conditions, while district heating network with bio- and geothermal energy resource highly favors clean heat transformation scenario. In addition, 3D printing has a prodigious role to reduce building lifecycle emissions and hybrid policies as well as reward-based policies yields better outcomes. Promoting hydrogen utilization and carbon capture storage and utilization technologies can pivot climate neutrality in the sectors that are difficult to decarbonize. On the other hand, it can be observed that more focus is provided to reduce emissions and significantly less attention is focused on carbon sink.

61 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Wang et al. as mentioned in this paper studied the dynamic government's reward and penalty evolution during the construction process, and found that the dynamic reward and static penalty is the best strategy to promote green building construction, while the probability of active supervision by government is inversely proportional to subsidy and positively proportional to penalty.
Abstract: Green building incentives are widely adopted in the world to promote green building construction. However, the incentives from the government are usually predetermined, which cannot obtain a stable effect in green construction practice. To better promote green building construction, this paper studies dynamic government’s reward and penalty evolution during the construction process. Based on the prospect theory, the decision of government reward and penalty is formulated as evolutionary game model under four different scenarios: static reward and static penalty, dynamic reward and static penalty, static reward and dynamic penalty, and dynamic reward and dynamic penalty. Through theoretical analysis, our results revealed that the dynamic reward and static penalty is the best strategy to promote green building construction. More specifically, if the intensity of subsidy and penalty increases, contractors tend to green construction; while the probability of active supervision by government is inversely proportional to subsidy and positively proportional to penalty. This study can provide a useful insight for the policy makers to formulate effective reward and penalty policy, thereby standardizing the behavior of contractors, and reducing the negative impact of the construction industry on the environment.

35 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a case study and simulation method are used to simulate the impact of implementation strength for environmental policies on the decision-making of stakeholders in green building alliances, and the simulation results show that the effect of different environmental policies should reach a certain threshold (over 0.5).

27 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Wang et al. as mentioned in this paper investigated the dynamic evolution of the stakeholders' decision-making behavior, and introduced public supervision and penalty mechanisms to construct a tripartite evolutionary game model including the government, supplier and developer.

23 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Feb 2022-Energy
TL;DR: In this article , the effect of financial and fiscal incentive policies on the energy performance of residential properties in 19 districts of Portugal from 2014 to 2021 was investigated through econometric modelling.

19 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors investigate the demographic, psychological and behavioral profiles of consumers who are willing to pay more for environmentally friendly products and find that this segment of consumers were more likely to be females, married and with at least one child living at home.
Abstract: Concerns related to the environment are evident in the increasingly ecologically conscious marketplace. Using various statistical analyses, investigats the demographic, psychological and behavioral profiles of consumers who are willing to pay more for environmentally friendly products. Finds that this segment of consumers were more likely to be females, married and with at least one child living at home. They reported that today’s ecological problems are severe, that corporations do not act responsibly toward the environment and that behaving in an ecologically favorable fashion is important and not inconvenient. They place a high importance on security and warm relationships with others, and they often consider ecological issues when making a purchase. Managerial implications for green marketers and suggestions for future research are discussed.

2,130 citations

01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: In this article, the authors investigate the demographic, psychological and behavioral profiles of consumers who are willing to pay more for environmentally friendly products and find that this segment of consumers were more likely to be females, married and with at least one child living at home.
Abstract: Concerns related to the environment are evident in the increasingly ecologically conscious marketplace. Using various statistical analyses, investigats the demographic, psychological and behavioral profiles of consumers who are willing to pay more for environmentally friendly products. Finds that this segment of consumers were more likely to be females, married and with at least one child living at home. They reported that today's ecological problems are severe, that corporations do not act responsibly toward the environment and that behaving in an ecologically favorable fashion is important and not inconvenient. They place a high importance on security and warm relationships with others, and they often consider ecological issues when making a purchase. Managerial implications for green marketers and suggestions for future research are discussed. Concerns related to the environment are evident in the increasingly environmentally conscious marketplace. Over the years, a majority of consumers have realized that their purchasing behavior had a direct impact on many ecological problems. Customers adapted to this new threatening situation by considering environmental issues when shopping (e.g. checking if the product is wrapped in recycled material) and by purchasing only ecologically compatible products (e.g. biodegradable paint, CFC-free hairspray or unbleached coffee filters). Perhaps the most convincing evidence supporting the growth of ecologically favorable consumer behavior is the increasing number of individuals who are willing to pay more for environmentally friendly products.

2,049 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: In this article, it was shown that in the presence of sufficient spillovers of the R&D benefits, duopolists, cooperating in R&DM but not in the output, spend more on R&DI than non-cooperating firms at both stages, and also produce more output, closest to the socially optimal level.
Abstract: In our article published in this Review (volume 78, no. 5, December 1988, pp. 1133–37), we have shown that in the presence of sufficient spillovers of the R&D benefits, duopolists, cooperating in R&D but not in the output, spend more on R&D than noncooperating firms at both stages, and also produce more output, closest to the socially optimal level. A second symmetric result is that for small spillovers, duopolists cooperating neither in R&D nor in output spend more on R&D and produce more output than cooperative firms. However, this result has been obscured by an obvious inequality inversion and other typos implying a modification in the conclusions. Indeed in fn. 13 on p. 1135 one should have that x > x∗ iff

1,907 citations

Book
01 Jan 1990
TL;DR: This article developed a text in microeconomics that succeeds in being bothchallenging and user-friendly, designed for final-year undergraduate and graduate students of microeconomic theory, with numerous problem sets and exercises.
Abstract: David kreps has developed a text in microeconomics that succeeds in being bothchallenging and user-friendly. The book is designed for final-year undergraduateand graduate students of microeconomics theory, with numerous problem sets andexercises. The author uses a wide variety of markets for examples with aconcentration in industrial economics. He provides a very broad coverage oftraditional and modern approaches to microeconomic theory, with a carefulprogression from the traditional approach to modern developments.

1,897 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: In this paper, two types of agreement are observed: precompetitive and extended collusion between partners, creating common policies at the product level, and the usual justifications of this extension are the difficulties of protecting intellectual property, in order to recuperate jointly their R&D investments.
Abstract: Contrary to the usual assumption made in most oligopoly models, relations among firms are seldom of a wholly cooperative or noncooperative type: in many situations, they compete in some fields, while they cooperate in others. An important example is the case of cooperative research efforts bringing fierce competitors together. Two types of agreement are observed. First R&D cooperation can take place at the so-called “precompetitive stage”: companies share basic information and efforts in the R&D stage but remain rivals in the market-place.1 A second type of agreement involves an extended collusion between partners, creating common policies at the product level. The usual justifications of this extension are the difficulties of protecting intellectual property. The idea is then to allow partners who have achieved inventions together, to also control together the processes and products which embody the results of their collaboration, in order to recuperate jointly their R&D investments.2 What could be expected from these types of agreement is a reduction in R&D expenditures, because of less wasteful duplication, and a reduction of total production, because of more ∗Reprinted from The American Economic Review, 78(5), 1133-1137, 1988. †Center for Operations Research & Econometrics, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium. We are grateful to Jean

1,849 citations

Trending Questions (3)
How Government Policies Intervene in Green Buildings?

Government subsidy policies play a crucial role in incentivizing green building development. Subsidies to developers, consumers, or both enhance green efforts, with dual subsidies yielding optimal profits and social welfare.

What are the impact of Government incentives in green project management?

The paper discusses the incentive effects of government subsidy policies on green buildings, but it does not specifically mention the impact of government incentives on green project management.

How do incentives and tax credits for green building work?

The study found that government subsidies were a positive incentive for the development of green buildings, with simultaneous subsidies for both developers and consumers resulting in the greatest profits and highest social welfare.