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Journal ArticleDOI

The Indian Man: A Biography of James Mooney

23 Jan 1985-Ethnohistory-Vol. 32, Iss: 4, pp 399
TL;DR: The Indian Man examines the life of James Mooney (1861-1921), the son of poor Irish immigrants who became a champion of Native peoples and one of the most influential anthropology fieldworkers of all time as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: The Indian Man examines the life of James Mooney (1861-1921), the son of poor Irish immigrants who became a champion of Native peoples and one of the most influential anthropology fieldworkers of all time. As a staff member of the Smithsonian Institution for over three decades, Mooney conducted fieldwork and gathered invaluable information on rapidly changing Native American cultures across the continent. His fieldwork among the Eastern Cherokees, Cheyennes, and Kiowas provides priceless snapshots of their traditional ways of life, and his sophisticated and sympathetic analysis of the 1890 Ghost Dance and the consequent tragedy at Wounded Knee has not been surpassed a century later. L. G. Moses is a professor of history at Oklahoma State University. He is the author of Wild West Shows and the Images of American Indians, 1833-1933.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: On November 17, 1890, General Nelson A. Miles, acting under the authority of President Benjamin Harrison to take "such steps as may be necessary" to suppress an anticipated "outbreak" of Lakota Ghost Dancers, ordered troops to the Pine Ridge and Rosebud reservations in South Dakota.
Abstract: On November 17, 1890, General Nelson A. Miles, acting under the authority of President Benjamin Harrison to take "such steps as may be necessary" to suppress an anticipated "outbreak" of Lakota Ghost Dancers, ordered troops to the Pine Ridge and Rosebud reservations in South Dakota. Over the next two weeks, soldiers from as far away as California were summoned, as the largest concentration of U.S. troops since the Civil War surrounded these and two other Lakota reservations-

20 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This participant observation research developed a grounded theory of supportive factors found in the Native American Church (NAC) and a model of social work collaboration with the traditional process of the NAC is offered.
Abstract: Native American Church (NAC) members often find themselves victims of discrimination in alcohol/drug treatment because of sacramental use of peyote in their church services, despite anthropology and religious scholars having long provided anecdotal observations of alcoholism recoveries through the NAC. This participant observation research developed a grounded theory of supportive factors found in the NAC. Departing from a Western medical model that focuses on peyote, these NAC members emphasize a spiritual process and the vast and supportive network of their church as the primary supportive agent. A model of social work collaboration with the traditional process of the NAC is offered.

20 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
28 Feb 1997
TL;DR: Merrill as mentioned in this paper provides an overview of the extensive anthropological collections associated with the Kiowa Indians of Oklahoma housed in the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. The guide, produced between 1985 and 1994, is divided into five major sections.
Abstract: Merrill, William L., Marian Kaulaity Hansson, Candace S. Greene, and Frederick J. Reuss. A Guide to the Kiowa Collections at the Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Contributions to Anthropology, number 40, 443 pages, 129 figures, frontispiece, 1997.—This guide provides an overview of the extensive anthropological collections associated with the Kiowa Indians of Oklahoma housed in the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. The vast majority of these collections are found in the Smithsonian's Department of Anthropology, located in the National Museum of Natural History. In the 1990s, the Kiowa Tribe of Oklahoma included over 10,000 enrolled members, more than half of whom resided in western Oklahoma. Before settling on a reservation in the second half of the nineteenth century, the Kiowas were nomadic bison hunters on the southern Plains who raided deep into Mexico. The Kiowa materials at the Smithsonian were collected for the most part after the creation of the Kiowa reservation, but the information they contain spans a period from before European contact to the late twentieth century. The guide, produced between 1985 and 1994, is divided into five major sections. Each of the first four sections focuses on a major component of the Smithsonian's Kiowa collection— material culture, manuscripts, artwork, and photographs—and includes background information on the collections as well as inventories and descriptions of them. The fifth section is a list of individuals whose names appear in association with the collections. This "List of Persons" indicates the specific materials in the collections with which each of these individuals is associated. The guide concludes with a summary of Smithsonian Kiowa collections located outside the Department of Anthropology and a bibliography of selected references on the Kiowa. OFFICIAL PUBLICATION DATE is handstamped in a limited number of initial copies and is recorded in the Institution's annual report, Annals of the Smithsonian Institution. SERIES COVER DESIGN: Rendering of a portion of the design painted on the interior of a woman's cow-hide robe (USNM 165267). See Figure 6 for the complete design. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data A guide to the Kiowa collections at the Smithsonian Institution / William L. Merrill ... [et al.]. p. cm. — (Smithsonian contributions to anthropology ; no. 40) Includes bibliographic references. 1. Kiowalndians—Material culture. 2. Kiowa Indians—Antiquities. 3. Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Office of Anthropology—Ethnological collections. I. Merrill, William L. II. Smithsonian Institution III Series GNl.S54no.40 [E99.K5] 301 s-dc20 [976.6'004974] 95-34258 ® The paper used in this publication meets the minimum requirements of the American National Standard for Permanence of Paper for Printed Library Materials Z39.48 1984.

20 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The impact of Boas on the political and ethical tone of the field, the prevalence of women in it, and the importance of his scientific background are discussed in this article. But the focus of this article is on the work of the anthropologists.
Abstract: Franz Boas organized and shaped American anthropology. No academic discipline of similar scope owed so much to just one person. Within three decades of coming to the United States from Germany he had trained the anthropologists who established its place within the universities and redirected its tone and ethos as well as its theories. The biographies under review help us understand the background, aims, and drive of the man. We shall consider, in particular, the impact he had on the political and ethical tone of the field, the prevalence of women in it, and the importance of his scientific background.

16 citations

01 Jan 2013
TL;DR: Grua and Kerstetter as discussed by the authors investigated the politics of memory in the Wounded Knee massacre, focusing on key English words and concepts: the massacre was a "massacre" rather than a "battle", Big Foot's band had been "friendly/peaceful" and not "hostile" in 1890, and, because the killings violated the 1868 Treaty of Fort Laramie, the United States had incurred a "liability" that needed to be "liquidated.
Abstract: LIABILITIES OF CONQUEST: WOUNDED KNEE AND THE POLITICS OF MEMORY by David William Grua, Ph.D., 2013 Department of History and Geography Texas Christian University Dissertation Advisor: Todd M. Kerstetter, Associate Professor of History On December 29, 1890, the US Seventh Cavalry held Minneconjou Lakota Chief Big Foot and his followers in custody at Wounded Knee Creek, South Dakota. As the soldiers disarmed the warriors, a single shot caused the cavalrymen to fire at the largely unarmed Indians, resulting in the deaths of hundreds of Lakota men, women, and children, as well as three dozen troopers. The event immediately entered the realm of memory, as defenders and detractors of the cavalrymen sought to determine exactly what had occurred at the creek. A court of inquiry declared that Wounded Knee was a heroic victory over “fanatical,” “hostile,” and “treacherous” Ghost Dancers. To commemorate the Seventh Cavalry’s gallantry, army officials awarded the soldiers twenty Medals of Honor and erected an obelisk at Fort Riley, Kansas, to honor the men slain in the “last battle” of the Indian Wars. In the years that followed, the Lakota survivors—scattered, impoverished, and marginalized—engaged in the politics of memory in compensation petitions, translated accounts dictated to sympathetic whites, and even on a monument at the mass grave. In response to their compensation claims, government bureaucrats in the early twentieth century responded that, because army officials had classified Big Foot’s band as “hostile” in 1890, the survivors were ineligible for reparations. The Lakotas countered by “reinventing the enemy’s language,” focusing on key English words and concepts: Wounded Knee was a “massacre” rather than a “battle,” Big Foot’s band had been “friendly/peaceful” and not “hostile” in 1890, and, because the killings violated the 1868 Treaty of Fort Laramie, the United States had incurred a “liability” that needed to be “liquidated.” For assistance, the survivors sought out “good white people,” sympathetic individuals who would use their political influence to support the Lakotas’ claims. In 1940, nearly fifty years after Wounded Knee, a congressional committee recommended that the United States compensate the survivors for the killings, although the onset of World War II precluded passage of the bill. The survivors’ engagement in the politics of memory, however, left legacies that continue to confront the nation’s liabilities of conquest.

15 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Collaborative ethnography as discussed by the authors is a powerful way to engage the public with anthropology, and it can be seen as a way to serve humankind more directly and more immediately.
Abstract: Collaborative ethnographythe collaboration of researchers and subjects in the production of ethnographic textsoffers us a powerful way to engage the public with anthropology. As one of many academic/applied approaches, contemporary collaborative ethnography stems from a wellestablished historical tradition of collaboratively produced texts that are often overlooked. Feminist and postmodernist efforts to recenter ethnography along dialogical lines further contextualize this historically situated collaborative practice. The goals of collaborative ethnography (both historical and contemporary) are now powerfully converging with those of a public anthropology that pulls together academic and applied anthropology in an effort to serve humankind more directly and more immediately.

319 citations

BookDOI
01 Jan 2002
TL;DR: In this paper, Deloria et al. presented a survey of the history of American Indians in the United States, Canada, and Mexico, focusing on the first contact, kinship, family kindreds, and community.
Abstract: List of Contributors.Introduction.1 Historiography.Philip J. Deloria (University of Colorado).2 First Contacts.John Kicza (Washington State University).3 Health, Disease, Demography.Russell Thornton (University of California, Los Angeles).4 Wag the Imperial Dog: Indians and Overseas Empires in North America, 1650-1776.Gregory E. Dowd (University of Notre Dame).5 Native Americans and the United States, Canada, and Mexico.R. David Edmunds (Indiana University).6 Languages: Linguistic Change and the Study of Indian Languages from Colonial Times to the Present.Regna Darnell (University of Western Ontario).7 Native American Systems of Knowledge.Clara Sue Kidwell (University of Oklahoma).8 Native American Spirituality: History, Theory, and Reformulation.Lee Irwin (College of Charleston).9 Indians and Christianity.Willard Rollins (University of Nevada, Las Vegas).10 Kinship, Family Kindreds, and Community.Jay Miller (Simon Fraser University).11 The Nature of Conquest: Indians, Americans, and Environmental History.Louis Warren (University of California, Davis).12 Labor and Exchange in American Indian History.Patricia Albers (University of Minnesota).13 American Indian Warfare: The Cycles of Conflict and the Militarization of Native North America.Tom Holm (University of Arizona).14 Indian Law, Sovereignty, and State Law: Native People and the Law.Sidney L. Harring (City University of New York Law School).15 Federal and State Policies and American Indians.Donald Fixico (Western Michigan University).16 Gender in Native America.Betty Bell (University of Michigan).17 Metis, Mestizo, and Mixed-Blood.Jennifer Brown (University of Winnipeg) and Theresa Schenck (Washington State University).18 Transforming Outsiders: Captivity, Adoption, and Slavery Considered.Pauline Turner Strong (University of Texas at Austin).19 Translation and Cultural Brokerage.Eric Hinderaker (University of Utah).20 Native American Literatures.P. Jane Hafen (University of Nevada, Las Vegas).21 Indigenous Art: Creating Value and Sharing Beauty.Nancy Parezo (University of Arizona).22 Performative Traditions in American Indian History.George Moses (Oklahoma State University).23 American Indian Education: by Indians vs. for Indians.K. Tsianina Lomawaima (University of Arizona).24 Wanted: More Histories of Indian Identity.Alexandra Harmon (University of Washington).25 Sovereignty.Gerald Taiaike Alfred (University of Victoria).Bibliography.Index

265 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In more than a hundred years of Anglo-American ethnography, observation has been combined with a wide variety of theoretical outlooks from structured-functionalist to critical writings.
Abstract: Ethnography is never mere description, rather it is a theory of describing that has always been controversial as to the what and how thus inspiring a dynamic intellectual process. The process has been methodologically eclectic and innovative, governed by both consensual and outdated rules. Throughout more than hundred years of Anglo-American ethnography, observation has been combined with a wide variety of theoretical outlooks from structured-functionalist to critical writings.

114 citations

MonographDOI
Kiara M. Vigil1
01 Jul 2015
TL;DR: Vigil as discussed by the authors examines the literary output of four influential American Indian intellectuals who challenged long-held conceptions of Indian identity at the turn of the twentieth century and traces how the narrative discourses created by these figures spurred wider discussions about citizenship, race, and modernity in the United States.
Abstract: In the United States of America today, debates among, between, and within Indian nations continue to focus on how to determine and define the boundaries of Indian ethnic identity and tribal citizenship. From the 1880s and into the 1930s, many Native people participated in similar debates as they confronted white cultural expectations regarding what it meant to be an Indian in modern American society. Using close readings of texts, images, and public performances, this book examines the literary output of four influential American Indian intellectuals who challenged long-held conceptions of Indian identity at the turn of the twentieth century. Kiara M. Vigil traces how the narrative discourses created by these figures spurred wider discussions about citizenship, race, and modernity in the United States. Vigil demonstrates how these figures deployed aspects of Native American cultural practice to authenticate their status both as indigenous peoples and as citizens of the United States.

65 citations

DOI
01 Jan 1990
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore the emergence of the Metis Indians in the Pacific Northwest by tracing the growing up experiences of fur trade youngsters from infancy to old age, focusing on the children at Fort Vancouver, the Hudson's Bay Company headguarters for the region.
Abstract: If the p s y c h i a t r i s t ' s b e l i e f that childhood determines adult behaviour i s true, then h i s t o r i a n s should be able to ascertain much about the f a b r i c of past cultures by examining the way i n which children were raised. Indeed, i t may be argued that the roots of new cultures are to be found i n the growing up experiences of the f i r s t generation. Such i s the premise adopted i n t h i s thesis, which explores the emergence of the Metis i n the P a c i f i c Northwest by tr a c i n g the l i v e s of fur trade youngsters from c h i l d b i r t h to old age. S p e c i f i c a l l y , the study focuses on the children at Fort Vancouver, the Hudson's Bay Company headguarters for the region, during the f i r s t h a l f of the nineteenth century — a period of rapid s o c i a l change. While breaking new ground i n childhood h i s t o r y , the the s i s also provides a s o c i a l history of fur trade society west of the Rocky Mountains. Central to the study i s the conviction that the fur trade constituted a v i a b l e culture. While the parents i n t h i s culture came from a wide v a r i e t y of ethnic backgrounds, t h e i r mixed-blood youngsters were ra i s e d i n the wilderness' of Oregon i n a fusion of f ur trade capitalism, Euro-American ideology and native values — a mil i e u which forged and shaped t h e i r i d e n t i t i e s . This thesis advances the int e r p r e t a t i o n that, despite much v a r i a t i o n i n the children's growing up experience, most

29 citations